News From The Field

KSOC-TV on Jan. 26: Intersecting Identities Improving Health Outcomes for LGBTQI2-S Youth of Color

January 25, 2017 | Emily Taylor

On January 26 at 2 p.m. ET, KSOC-TV will release the interactive webisode, “Intersecting Identities Improving Health Outcomes for LGBTQI2-S Youth of Color.” This webisode will focus on issues affecting LGBTQI2-S youth of color and share ways to help providers, after-school program facilitators, families, and youth understand the intersection of identities and the associated challenges of trauma, suicide, and resilience. Participants will learn strategies to address behavioral health challenges and facilitate healing among children, youth, and families. State and local community leaders, health care providers, child- and youth-serving agencies, schools, LGBTQI2-S supporting organizations, and caregivers are encouraged to watch and participate in the webisode.

Watch the live webcast on January 26 at 2 p.m. ET»

Access previous KSOC-TV webisodes»

Podcast: Home-visit program in child maltreatment cases strengthens parent-child interaction

January 24, 2017 | Emily Taylor

NIH funded a study of a home-visit program for parents previously investigated for child abuse. The study found that the program led to dramatic reduction in the percentage of young children who were removed from their homes and placed in foster care. During the home visits, trained specialists videotaped parents playing with their children and then provided feedback for the parents to help them be more sensitive to their child’s emotional and social cues.

Listen to the podcast recording about this research study»

Research on Awareness of Impact of Diet on Children’s Mental Development

January 23, 2017 | Emily Taylor

Recent research published in The British Journal of Nutrition measured awareness of the impact of diet on children’s mental health among teachers and parents in four European countries. While the study showed high understanding of the impact of diet on physical health, they found lower levels of awareness about the importance of diet on brain development and cognition, especially among parents. The researchers concluded there is need for greater education of parents.

Read about the study measuring parent’s awareness of the importance of diet for children’s mental health»

Parenting Factsheets for Families Now Available in Spanish

January 12, 2017 | Emily Taylor

The Child Welfare Information Gateway now has Spanish versions available of three publications from their Factsheets for Families series on parenting abused children:

  • Parenting a Child Who Has Been Sexually Abused: A Guide for Foster and Adoptive Parents (La Crianza de un Niño que ha Sido Víctima de Abuso Sexual: Una Guía Para Padres de Crianza y Adoptivos)
  • Parenting a Child Who Has Experienced Trauma (La Crianza de un Niño que ha Experimentado Trauma)
  • Parenting a Child Who Has Experienced Abuse or Neglect (La Crianza de un Niño que ha Experimentado Abuso o Negligencia)

These sheets along with additional resources in Spanish translation are available on the Information Gateway site.

Access the Spanish language resources on the Child Welfare Information Gateway»

Study shows how comorbid mental health conditions can impact child’s care in hospital

January 9, 2017 | Emily Taylor

Recent research published in Pediatrics in November 2016 is the first study to show how comorbid mental health conditions, such as anxiety, ADHD and depression, can impact a child’s care in the hospital. Based on their analysis of hospital data, researchers found that children hospitalized for medical or surgical procedures who have an existing mental health condition stay in the hospital longer.

Read the article about research on hospital stays for children with existing mental health conditions»

Community Schools Can Make a Difference for LGBTQ Youth

January 5, 2017 | Emily Taylor

This recent post from the Center for American Progress highlights the many benefits of community schools that “leverage partnerships between government agencies and community-based service providers to improve the educational achievement of students by caring for the overall well-being of students and their families”. The authors argue that community schools can also improve outcomes for LGBTQ youth by providing access to services and supports.

Read about community school programs that support LGBTQ youth»

New American Academy of Pediatrics Policy Statement

January 5, 2017 | Emily Taylor

“Addressing Early Childhood Emotional and Behavioral Problems” is a new American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement that outlines effective evidence-based interventions in child care. It covers some of the problems frequently seen in young children including reactive attachment disorder; disruptive behavior disorders; attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); and anxiety and mood disorders. Lead author, Dr. Mary Margaret Gleason, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral science at Tulane University School of Medicine, points to evidence supporting therapy for young children, over treatment with psychotropic medications.

Read about the new American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement»

Teaching school children about mental health

January 4, 2017 | Emily Taylor

A recent BBC story profiles CuesEd, a program being used in some London schools to help children learn how to recognize, talk about and manage their emotions. The program aims to provide children with knowledge and skills before they reach adolescence.

Read the article about mental health education in English elementary school»

Viewpoint in Favor of Universal Home Visits

January 3, 2017 | Emily Taylor

In this viewpoint piece, Martha Davis, MSS, a senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, shares her experiences as a home visitor and outlines the benefits of such programs in supporting families.

Read about universal home visits»

New Hampshire Program Finds Doctor Visits Help Keep Teens off Drugs and Alcohol

December 22, 2016 | Emily Taylor

A program in New Hampshire is finding that regular conversations with their doctor can be valuable in preventing drug and alcohol use by teens. The state has implemented an evidence-based “screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment” (SBIRT) protocol in 23 medical facilities across the state, thanks in part to grant funding.

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Watch a video to learn more about New Hampshire’s SBIRT program aimed at preventing teen alcohol and drug use»