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Integrating wraparound into a schoolwide system of positive behavior supports
Author: Eber, L., Hyde, K., & Suter, J. C.
We describe the structure for implementation of the wraparound process within a multi-tiered system of school wide positive behavior support (SWPBS) to address the needs of the 1-5% of students with complex emotional/behavioral challenges. The installation of prerequisite system features that, based on a 3 year demonstration process, we consider critical to full operation of the Tier 3 wraparound intervention within a system of SWPBS is also described. We include examples of system implementation benchmarks that occur concurrently with student outcome data and are logically linked to full operation and sustainability of wraparound implementation. Challenges surrounding implementation and proposed advancements are also discussed. (Contains 2 figures.)
Keywords: research, study, abstract, test

"During Meetings, I Can't Stand It When..." A Guide for Facilitators and Team Members
Author: Pathways RTC
This brief addresses a number of things that commonly happen in team-based planning meetings that can be frustrating for young people. It includes suggestions and strategies that meeting facilitators and team members can use to address these issues and promote more positive youth participation.
Keywords: family, youth, guide

A Best Practice Model for a Community Mobilization Team
Author: Andrew Debicki
This best practice model defines wraparound community mobilization teams known as CMT. It covers community development and mobilization efforts across Ontario, describes purposes of the CMT, expectations, structure and best ways to develop CMTs.
Keywords: principle, theory

A case study of the effects of a school-based wraparound approach on students with behavioral difficulties
Author: James, J. M.
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of wraparound services on students' classroom behavior, social behavior, emotional functioning, and academic skills. As a philosophy and a process, wraparound services support the student, family, and teachers by organizing and blending natural supports, interagency services, and behavioral and academic interventions in the schools. Through the Illinois Positive Behavior Interventions in the Schools (IL-PBIS) Network, the schools selected for this study have been supported in implementing school-wide preventions and interventions, targeted interventions with small groups of students not responding to school wide supports, and intensive interventions with students with the most severe emotional and behavioral needs. This dissertation used multiple case study methodology to examine the effects of wraparound services as a part of a three tiered behavioral support system on the emotional and behavioral functioning of two students. Using surveys completed over time by the students' wraparound teams and stored in an online data management system, the researcher analyzed the effects of wraparound services on the emotional, behavioral, social, and academic functioning of the students. Additionally, the researcher sought to identify how the integrity of wraparound implementation affected student success. Results of this study highlight the truly individualized nature of wraparound, as the students received very different interventions, had different needs, and varying levels of success. This study also sheds light on the levels of success for a student receiving wraparound as a part of special education supports versus a student receiving wraparound as a part of general education supports. Through receiving wraparound supports, both students showed overall improvements both behaviorally and academically, reflecting many studies documenting the connection between academic and behavioral functioning. There was also found to be a high level of integrity of intervention implementation for both students, as rated by their teams.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

A community response to tragedy: Individualized services for families
Author: Ray, J., Stromwell, L. K., Neumiller, S., & Roloff, M.
The murder of a 13-year-old young woman mobilized one community to initiate a “wraparound” service model for their most hard-to-reach families. These families struggled with parental substance abuse, youth at high risk, and associated complex needs cutting across existing categorical programs. The strength and empowerment based program, in which interventions were designed specific to each family, presented challenges in evaluating outcomes with traditional standardized instruments. This paper describes the project, its outcomes for families and youth, and the evaluation design that evolved to measure outcomes in a strength-based program with no uniform intervention.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

A comparative evaluation of wrap-around services and partial hospitalization for preschool children exhibiting severe behavior problems (1998)
Author: Deaner, A. L.
The central question addressed by this study was, did psychiatrically diagnosed preschool children living below the poverty line, who received wrap-around services both at home and in the partial hospitalization program they attended, experience a decrease in behavioral symptomatology, as compared to children enrolled in the same partial hospitalization program who did not receive those services? A secondary question examined the relationship between specific demographic variables and behavioral outcomes. Twenty-eight, 3- to 5-year-old emotionally disturbed children living below the poverty line were evaluated and randomly assigned to treatment or comparison groups. All subjects attended a preschool partial hospitalization program for a minimum of 6 months. Additionally, 12 subjects received a variety of wrap-around services including, but not limited to behavior management consultation and case management. Individualized services were delivered to all aspects of the treatment subject's lives. Multiple outcome measures indicated that in spite of long term, intensive interventions, subjects who both attended the partial hospitalization program and received wrap-around services did not evidence significant changes in behavioral symptomatology as compared to those subjects who only attended the partial hospitalization program. Furthermore, there was evidence for the enduring nature of problem behaviors. Both parent and counselor reports of child problems were almost identical at pretreatment and at follow-up. While all of the subjects exhibited gains in direct observations of impulse control, improvements were attributed to maturation and practice effect. Results also indicated that family instability, low parent involvement, and living apart from the biological family were all related to attrition and continued behavior problems. Results were discussed in terms of both the entrenched nature of family difficulties associated with poverty and limitations inherent in the current service delivery system. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Keywords: research, study, abstract
A comparison of school-based and community-based adherence to wraparound during family planning meetings
Author: Nordness, P. D.
Recently a number of studies have begun to examine how the wraparound approach is adhered to during family planning meetings in community-based settings. However, no studies have compared wraparound family planning meetings across community-based and school-based settings. The purpose of this study was to examine adherence to the wraparound approach during family planning meetings across school-based and community-based settings to determine if there is a difference in the participants, domains discussed, and key characteristics of wraparound. Over the course of 9 months, observations were conducted on community-based (N = 85) and school-based (N = 109) wraparound family planning meetings. Results indicate a number of similarities and a few differences between the settings. Implications, limitations, and suggestions for future research are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

A comparison of school-based and community-based wraparound approaches for children with emotional disturbance
Author: Nordness, P. D.
Research and evaluation of the wraparound approach has typically focused on outcomes, service providers, and costs. While many of these studies describe a process that is consistent with the wraparound approach, few studies have reported attempts to monitor or measure the treatment fidelity of the wraparound approach. The purpose of this dissertation was to: (a) assess the implementation of wraparound in school-based settings and (b) compare the implementation of wraparound in school-based and community-based settings to determine if there is a statistically significant difference in the implementation of wraparound across settings. In order to address these research purposes the results from 109 observations of school-based wraparound family planning meetings indicated that for the most part care coordinators adhered to the essential elements of the wraparound approach. Families were treated as active partners in the process and services were individualized to meet the needs of the child and family. However, some areas that needed improvement included the use of community resources and consistent measurement of outcomes. The results of observations made at 109 school-based and 85 community-based family planning meetings indicated that there are a number of similarities between the two settings, such as incorporating a family driven approach and providing unconditional care. However, the school-based approach was significantly more likely to adhere to the Interagency/Collaboration characteristic and Care Coordination characteristic than the community-based approach. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

A Comparison of Six Practice Models
Author: Frank Rider Submitted By: Frank Rider
Crosswalk of several team planning models, including wraparound
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, orient, orientation, family, youth, wraparound

A comparison of the Children's Functional Assessment Rating Scale and the Child Behavior Checklist used in a wraparound program
Author: Mihalcin, D.
The criterion related validity of the Children's Functional Assessment Rating Scale (CFARS) was examined by comparing the assessment's selected scores to the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) selected scores taken from child psychological evaluations in a Pennsylvania wraparound program. There is no clear evidence that a study has attempted to determine the CFARS criterion related validity using a correlation between the CFARS and norm-referenced measure (e.g., the CBCL) for validation purposes. Therefore, scores from the relatively new CFARS and the norm-referenced CBCL were collected and analyzed at two different time points in order to determine if there was a significant correlation. This quantitative study used archived scores from 91 child and adolescent participant evaluations. There are seven domains from each assessment that are similar and CBCL t-scores and CFARS severity scores for the domains were compared using a Pearson correlation analysis. The results indicated that all seven domains of the CFARS showed significant correlation to all seven domains of the CBCL at both time points. Therefore, the results of the data analysis from the seven select domains help further understand the criterion related validity of the CFARS through validation against the norm-referenced CBCL. Conclusions of this study were discussed and there are recommendations for future research. Based on the results, this study should help introduce more psychologists and clinicians to the CFARS assessment tool, which is already being used in several states with success.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

A Comprehensive Review of Published Wraparound Literature, 1988-2012
Author: Wraparound Evaluation and Research Team (WERT), University of Washington Submitted By: National Wraparound Initiative
This is a review of 198 pieces of literature published about Wraparound since 1988, including journal articles, books, book chapters and dissertations. Trends pointed to an accelerating growth rate in the publication of literature about Wraparound. However, results of the analysis also indicated a need for additional rigorous studies to be included in Wraparound's growing literature base.
Keywords: research, review

A descriptive study of treatment integrity in community-based wraparound
Author: Kumar, N.
The youth and family mental health literatures suggest that wraparound service delivery, guided by a core set of elements, is a "promising practice" to support youth with serious emotional and behavioral risk factors and their families. However, the degree of adherence to the 11 essential elements of wraparound service is rarely studied. The purpose of this descriptive quantitative telephone survey was to explore and describe the percentage of treatment integrity in community-based wraparound service delivery. The Wraparound Fidelity Index (WFI) 3.0 survey was administered via telephone to three categories of participants: youth = 12, caregivers = 16, and resource facilitators = 0, to collect data on the percentage of treatment integrity in the community-based wraparound program sample. The treatment integrity data from the community-based wraparound program sample was compared to treatment integrity data from a large representative sample of 16 wraparound program sites nationwide. Results indicate that fidelity in the community-based wraparound sample is in the borderline to adequate standards range, while the large representative sample is in the adequate to high fidelity standards range. The findings indicate that the community-based services, voice and choice, cultural competence, and youth and family team are strengths for the community-based wraparound program. Limitations of the community-based wraparound program are similar to that of many wraparound program sites. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Keywords: research, study, abstract
A Dozen Mistakes in Using Family Partners in Wraparound
Author: Patricia Miles
12 mistakes to avoid in using family partners in wraparound; Making Family Support a Specialty Service, Creating an Assistant Class, Failing to Hire Family Members in this Role, Confusing Agreement and Understanding, Family Partners as Parent Correctors, Family Partner as Ultimate Role Model,Turning family partners into youth workers,Family Partners as the Values Police, Family Partner as Decoration, Confusing Personalities and Skills, Confusing Peer-to-Peer Support and the Wraparound Process and Stopping at One.
Keywords: human resource, training, coaching, coach, supervision, supervise, family partner

A Fiscal Analysis of Wraparound in Oregon
Author: Oregon Health Authority, Addictions and Mental Health Division
The Oregon Health Authority, Addictions and Mental Health Division, conducted a comparative analysis of costs in regions served by the ten Oregon Health Plan (OHP) Mental Health Organizations (MHOs) according to participation in the Statewide Children’s Wraparound Initiative (SCWI) demonstration project. This study shows the initial findings of that analysis, demonstrating generally lower costs for children's mental health services in the wraparound demonstration sites.
Keywords: research, evaluation, program, evaluation, report, costs, finance, finances, cost, analysis, expenditure, expenditures, study, research

A Governor's Guide to Children's Cabinets
Author: Ann Segal, Lisa Grossman, & Anna Lovejoy
This Guide is designed to serve as a road map for governors and their staffs interested in designing their own successful Governor’s Children’s Cabinets.
Keywords: vision, mission, strategy, plan, MOU, information, share, legislation, law, policy, laws, policies

A letter from Australia—The potential of a 'Wraparound' approach to reducing juvenile offending in New South Wales
Author: Nisbet, I., Graham, A., & Newell, S.
This article reports on the Family Inclusion Project, which trialled a ‘Wraparound’ casework approach to working with young offenders in a regional town in New South Wales, Australia. The project focused on reducing re-offending by improving engagement with family and community support services and improving interagency collaboration. Although the project was a small scale, short-term pilot, it provided rich insight into the complex lives of Juvenile Justice clients and their families. This article highlights important issues in implementing a Wraparound casework model in a regional community.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

A Narrative Review of Wraparound Outcome Studies
Author: Jesse Suter & Eric Bruns
A review of wraparound outcomes and publications aiming towards cataloging outcomes and results from controlled studies.
Keywords: research, evaluation, review

A New Zealander Visits Wraparound Programs in the Northwest
Author: Roy Bergquist Submitted By: Roy Bergquist
In this informal letter, a wraparound provider from New Zealand reflects on his experiences visiting wraparound programs in the Pacific Northwest.
Keywords: international, evaluation, study

A New Zealander Visits Wraparound Programs in the Northwest
Author: Roy Bergquist
In this informal letter, a wraparound provider from New Zealand reflects on his experiences visiting wraparound programs in the Pacific Northwest.
Keywords: international

A Proposal to Unite Two Different Worlds of Children's Mental Health
Author: Weisz, J. R., Sandler, I. N., Durlak, J. A., & Anton, B. S.
Responds to comments made by Holden and Blau (see record 2006-11202-017) on the current authors' original article (see record 2005-11115-005). The current authors suggest combining the complementary strengths of the community-based approaches identified by Holden and Blau (2006) and the evidence-based approaches discussed in their original article, rather than argue about the comparative limitations of each approach. Given that the contents of both systems of care and wraparound are free to vary with available services in the community, they suggest ensuring that those specific services are, in fact, interventions that have been tested and shown to work.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

A Randomized Trial of Wraparound Facilitation Versus Usual Child Protection Services (2014)
Author: Browne, D., Puente-Duran, S., Shlonsky, A., Thabane, L., & Verticchio, D.
Objective: To evaluate whether the addition of a wraparound facilitator to regular child protection services improved child and family functioning over 20 months. Method: A single blind randomized controlled trial with concealment and stratification across three sites (N = 135 eligible families with substantiated maltreatment). Results: Based on 2 × 2 mixed analysis of variance and intention to treat, both groups improved in child impairments, d = −.60 [−.81, −.39], caregiver psychological distress, d = −.33 [−.52, −.13], and family resources, d = .44 [.27, .62]. No measurable benefit was associated with the intervention (e.g., child impairments, d = .14 [−.12, .52]). However, treatment fidelity analysis revealed that many components of wraparound were either missing or present in both groups. Conclusions: The presence of a facilitator alone did not appear to improve child or family functioning if the various components of wraparound were not adequately implemented.
Keywords: research, study, full text

A Roadmap for Building on Youth Strengths
Author: Kathy Cox
A core element of the wraparound process is the planning of services that build not only on family assets, but also on youth strengths and capabilities. This principle is founded in the belief that by capitalizing on the capabilities of children and adolescents, wraparound providers create a sense of hope for the future and enhance motivation for change (Saleebey, 2002). To facilitate the process of assessing the internal and external resources of youth, a variety of methods and tools have been advanced, ranging from informal “strengths chats” (VanDenBerg & Grealish, 1996) to standardized measures, such as the Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale (BERS; Epstein & Sharma, 1998). Little work has been done, however, to delineate the process of tapping the strengths identified through these and similar means. In an effort to fill this gap, this chapter provides a roadmap for wraparound practitioners, intended to guide their efforts in developing plans of care that build on the skills, interests, and capacities of the youth served.
Keywords: principle, theory

A Youth Guide to Wraparound Services: Your Life, Your Future
Author: Mary Grealish Submitted By: Mary Grealish
Brochure designed to let youth know how to understand Wraparound.
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, orient, orientation, family, youth, guide

Accountability and Quality Assurance in Wraparound
Author: Eric Bruns & April Sather
Webinar to review key issues to consider in building accountability for a wraparound project
Keywords: accountability, data, assessment, outcome, fidelity

Accountability and Quality Assurance in Wraparound: Poll
Author: [poll from webinar by Eric Bruns & April Sather]
Poll question during webinar: what type of data does your community or wraparound project most consistently collect and use?
Keywords: accountability, data, assessment, measure, outcome

Adherence to wraparound principles and association with outcomes
Author: Bruns, E. J., Suter, J. C., Force, M. M., & Burchard, J. D.
Maintaining fidelity to the principles of the Wraparound process in serving children with emotional and behavioral disorders is a high priority. However, the assumption that greater adherence to the model will yield superior outcomes has not been tested. The current study investigated associations between adherence to Wraparound principles, as assessed by the Wraparound Fidelity Index, second version (WFI), and child and family outcomes in one federally funded system-of-care site. Results demonstrated that higher fidelity was associated with better behavioral, functioning, restrictiveness of living, and satisfaction outcomes. No associations were found for several additional outcomes making interpretation difficult. Our study provides initial support for the hypothesis that maintaining fidelity to the philosophical principles of Wraparound is important to achieving outcomes. The study also provides support for the construct validity of the WFI as a service process measure.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

ADMIRE: Getting Practical About Being Strength-Based
Author: John Franz
This chapter explains why being strength based is important, what actions or behaviors characterize a strength based practice, specific metrics for determining whether services are being delivered in a strength-based way.
Keywords: principle, theory

Adolescent Risk Assessment
Author: Equipo Submitted By: Kathy Lazear
list of items for identifying risks and strengths across domains
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, strength, need, culture

All About Me
Author: Georgia Parent Support Network Submitted By: Sue Smith
tool for eliciting and recording child's view of strengths, some needs, and important life events
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, priority, culture, prioritize, outcome, goal, goals

An analysis of wraparound barker: Community based holistic treatment for juvenile sex offenders
Author: Artello, K.
Wraparound programs developed to serve children with severe mental illness to remain in their homes. Since 1990s, wraparound services have been adapted to address issues with other populations, such as sexual offending in juveniles. This study explores the voices of juvenile sex offenders in Wraparound Barker, an award-winning program in the midwest, to understand the effect of the program on their lives through their own eyes. Further, this study aims to discover the wraparound process on the ground to understand how it affects the youth’s experiences, positively and negatively. Data was collected through in-depth interviews with juvenile sex offenders (n=44), case reviews and participant observation for 6 months. Juveniles responded to Wraparound Barker along a continuum from ownership, empowerment, non-absorption to alienation. Some youth embraced the wraparound process and used it for everything that they could obtain from it, such as clothing for school, therapy, mentors, and activities. These youth used their agency where they could and reframed the court-ordered services to suit their own needs to fulfill the court’s wishes, effectively translating their powerlessness into agency. Other youth disengaged entirely from the process by boycotting meetings and missing appointments, exercising their actual agency in such a manner as to harm themselves. Many youth attributed their responses, positively and negatively, to Wraparound Barker to their relationships with their care coordinators, team members, and family to differing degrees. Relationship, value and change capitals influenced a youth and family’s response to wraparound services. Through relationship capital, families and youths may find strength, support and feelings of being special and important. Many discovered ways to decrease the chaos and increase connections in their lives through relationship capital. Value capital affected the decisions-making process of individuals involved in wraparound. When any individual did not embrace the values of wraparound, his/her decisions undermined the process and had the potential to hinder the youth’s progress. Through change capital, youth, families, and communities can find ways to improve their lives by providing a catalyst for transformation. These findings have policy and practice implications, which are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

An effectiveness study of wraparound care.
Author: Csokasy, J.
In this ex post facto study, the researcher uses a quasi-experimental design with a multi-method, multi-source data collection to examine the effects of wraparound care on the restrictiveness of living and utilization of psychiatric hospitalization for fourteen Severely Emotionally Disturbed (SED) children in the Directions Program. Restrictiveness of Living Environment Scale (ROLES) scores are statistically compared one year pre- and post-intervention for the single subject/group sample involved in wraparound care. Qualitative data from ten structured interviews with the parents/caregivers of the SED children examines effectiveness with reference to the child's behavior, parents/caregivers personal goals, family functioning, and to identify perceived effectiveness components. The Wraparound Services Satisfaction Questionnaire (WASS-Q) is utilized as the dependent measure of parent/caregiver satisfaction. The results demonstrate that after twelve months involvement in wraparound care, the SED children were residing in less restrictiveness settings with a significant decrease in psychiatric hospitalization. Findings include improvement in child behavior, parent/caregiver and family functioning, and overall program satisfaction. Effective wraparound components are identified as the wraparound support system, respite care, the crisis response with emergency back up, and parent involvement. This study discusses these results in the light of previous and emerging literature on wraparound care for SED children. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Keywords: research, study, abstract
An individualized wraparound process for children in foster care with emotional/behavioral disturbances: Follow-up findings and implications from a controlled study
Author: Clark, H. B., Prange, M. E., Lee, B., Stewart, E. S., McDonald, B. B., & Boyd, L. A.
The Fostering Individualized Assistance Program (FIAP) study was designed to investigate the effects of a case-managed, individualized, collaborative intervention with children with emotional or behavioral disturbance in the child welfare system (H. B. Clark and L. A. Boyd; 1990, 1992). This chapter provides (a) a description of the recommended practices of this intervention, (b) outcome data from a randomly selected group of children in foster care who received the intervention and a comparable group of children who received practices standard to the foster care system, (c) follow-up data on permanency status at 6–12 mo following any contact with the family specialists of the wraparound intervention, and (d) implications of these findings for wraparound interventions for children with emotional or behavior disturbances in the dependency system. A total of 131 children (aged 7–15 yrs) participated in the study. Results show that the FIAP wraparound process assisted in improving the externalizing and delinquency behaviors for males, and increased the likelihood of permanent placement for older youths.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

An investigation of treatment integrity and outcomes in wraparound services
Author: Toffalo, D. A. D.
Research on wraparound services has been generally positive, but has failed to include data regarding treatment integrity. Without such data, conclusions drawn from such studies are weakened. This study followed 28 children and adolescents receiving wraparound services in rural central Pennsylvania. Treatment integrity was defined as the percentage of service hours prescribed vs. received, and behavioral outcomes were defined as Total Problem Behavior T Scores on the Child Behavior Checklist. Preliminary analyses failed to reveal significant differences in sample means between included subjects and those excluded due to missing data. Outcome behavior ratings were significantly improved over baseline ratings. Regression analyses, however, failed to find a significant effect for treatment integrity when used in an outcome prediction equation for Therapeutic Support Staff, Mobile Therapy services, or Behavioral Specialist wraparound services. These results suggest that adherence to prescribed treatment hours may not be related to behavioral outcomes in a wraparound service setting.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

An Overview of Training for Key Wraparound Roles: The California Experience
Author: Brad Norman & Geraldine Rodriguez
Tips on informing people in key leadership positions about about wraparound’s underlying philosophy
Keywords: human resource, training

Analyzing Child and Adolescent Expenditures and Service Use Across Systems
Author: Pires, Sheila (The Technical Assistance Network for Children's Behavioral Health)
Financial mapping and analysis helps identify more effective, efficient and equitable use of funds through the development of coordinated cross-agency financing strategies. This resource describes this process and how to implement it in systems of care.
Keywords: finance, sustainability, cost, analysis, expenditure, expenditures, study, research

Appendix D: Sample Crisis Safety Plan Component of the Individualized Care Plan
Author: [not available]
Sample of a crisis safety plan from the webinar: Functional Behavioral Analysis and Wraparound on August 11, 2011.
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, crisis, safety

Applying behavior analysis within the wraparound process: A multiple baseline study
Author: Myaard, M. J., Crawford, C., Jackson, M., & Alessi, G.
The wraparound process has become an important component of many public sector service delivery systems. In this study, a multiple baseline design across participants and behaviors was used to examine the effects of wraparound services on the adjustment of four adolescents with severe emotional disturbance at imminent risk of long-term residential placement. Dependent measures were collected on a daily basis for I year in the areas of compliance, appropriate peer interactions, extreme verbal abuse, alcohol/drug use, and physical aggression.The Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale was also administered prebaseline and then quarterly throughout the study. Significant sequential effects across subjects and behaviors were immediately achieved and maintained over time. lnterobserver agreement, expert ratings on the integrity of the independent variable, and follow-up data are presented.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Approaches for mental health well-being in children and adolescents
Author: Bonham, E. B.
In the last two Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nurses (ACAPN) News columns, I discussed the role of child and adolescent psychiatric nursing in healthcare reform (Bonham, 2010) and educating the workforce that will care for the youthful psychiatric population (Bonham & Delaney, 2010). In this column, I discuss several approaches to consider for delivery of care: case management, wraparound process, and systems of care. While none of these are new, perhaps it is the right time to initiate them.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Approaches to serious emotional disturbance: Involving multiple systems
Author: Hansen, M., Litzelman, A., Marsh, D. T., & Milspaw, A.
Practice with children who have serious emotional disturbance (SED) increasingly requires multiple-systems intervention. Through a sample case, this article explores these interventions within the context of current national policy. Mental health collaboration with the systems of juvenile justice, education, child welfare, primary health care, and drug and alcohol services is summarized. The specific programs of multisystemic therapy, Pennsylvania's family-based mental health services, and Wraparound Milwaukee are presented as multiple-systems approaches that are successful with this population. The authors offer suggestions for emerging roles for psychologists within this context.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Arizona: Statewide Child and Family Team Approach
Author: Bruce Kamradt
Systems of care financing model covering target group, funding approach, care management and benefit plan.
Keywords: finance, sustainability, state, model

Assessing Fidelity to a Community-Based Treatment for Youth: The Wraparound Fidelity Index
Author: Bruns, E. J., Burchard, J. D., Suter, J. C., Leverentz-Brady, K., & Force, M. M.
In this article, the authors describe the development, psychometric characteristics, and potential utility of the "Wraparound Fidelity Index" (WFI), a multi-informant measure designed to assess providers' adherence during service delivery to the essential elements of wraparound. Results from 408 families across 16 sites in nine states indicated adequate psychometrics for use of the WFI as an overall fidelity measure. The psychometrics for individual element scores were less reliable, however. The authors discuss the implications for research and practice, identifying specific items to be revised and potential uses for the WFI. They also cover policy implications, including how to overcome challenges observed in implementing the wraparound approach nationally.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Assessing Implementation of Wraparound Using Measures of The Wraparound Fidelity Assessment System
Author: Jessica Chambers, Cherrie’ Russell, Eric Bruns, & Janet Walker
2010 presentation from Georgetown Training Institutes on moving from principles to practice and measuring the quality of practice for better fidelity and better outcomes.
Keywords: accountability, data, fidelity, assessment, measure

Assessing the wraparound process during family planning meetings
Author: Epstein, M. H., Nordness, P. D., Kutash, K., Duchnowski, A., Schrepf, S., Benner, G. J., & Nelson, J. R.
Research and evaluation of the wraparound process has typically focused on outcomes, service providers, and costs. While many of these studies describe a process that is consistent with the wraparound approach, few studies have reported attempts to monitor or measure the treatment fidelity of the wraparound process. The purpose of this study was to assess the fidelity of the wraparound process in a community-based system of care using the Wraparound Observation Form-Second Version. Results from 112 family planning meetings indicated some strengths and weaknesses within the current system. Families and professionals were frequently involved in the planning and implementation of the wraparound process. However, informal supports and natural family supports were not present in a majority of the meetings. Given the significant number of youth served in wraparound programs, the benefits of using the Wraparound Observation Form-Second Version as an instrument to monitor the fidelity of the wraparound approach should not be ignored.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Background Checks and Family Partners
Author: [Various NWI Advisors]
Information sheet by the Family Partner Task Force on how agencies have dealt with the hiring of people who are well qualified and have problematic personal histories revealed during background checks.
Keywords: human resource, role, family partner

Background Checks and Family Partners: Information Submitted by NWI Advisors
Author: Eric Bruns, April Sather, Janet Walker, Sarah Peterson
The NWI conducted a brief survey of its advisors to collect feedback on what types of data might be most important to include in a web-based "monitoring and feedback system" specific to wraparound implementation. Forty seven NWI advisors provided input via the survey.
Keywords: research, evaluation, program, report

Becoming a Medicaid Provider of Family and Youth Peer Support: Considerations for Family Run Organizations
Author: Kallal, J., Walker, J., Lewis, L.C., Simons, D., Lipper, J. & Pires, Sheila.
The Affordable Care Act provides a critical opportunity for family run organizations to expand their scope, achieve sustainable funding, and become established Medicaid providers of family and youth peer support services. This resource provides guidance to family run organizations that are considering whether to become Medicaid providers, and uses examples from three states - Arizona, Maryland, and Rhode Island - to illustrate key aspects of this decision and process. From the Center for Health Care Strategies, Inc. and accessed from: http://www.chcs.org/publications3960/publications_show.htm?doc_id=1261625#.UxpixfldUQF
Keywords: local, model, finance

Behavioral Health/Wraparound and Child Welfare Values Crosswalk
Author: Frank Rider Submitted By: Frank Rider
Comparison of the values underlying wraparound-like approaches with those underlying child welfare work
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, orient, orientation, family, youth

Best Practices for Increasing Meaningful Youth Participation in Collaborative Team Planning
Author: Janet S. Walker, Rujuta Gaonkar, Laurie Powers, Barbara Friesen, Beckie Child, & Ariel Holman
This brief offers tips to increase meaningful youth participation in collaborative team planning meetings.
Keywords: youth, training, youth partner, coaching, coach, supervision, supervise

Best Practices in Wraparound: A Multidimensional View of the Evidence
Author: Walter, U. M., & Petr, C. G.
This article presents a systematic review of the effectiveness of wraparound, a value-guided, widely used service planning process and philosophy of care originally developed for children with serious emotional disturbance and their families. In contrast to conventional systematic reviews, which concentrate on the empirical literature, this article uses the multidimensional evidence-based practice approach, which adds professional knowledge and consumer perspectives to a value-critical analysis. The findings contextualize the limited empirical support for wraparound within a social work value frame, suggesting areas of improvement for the implementation of the wraparound model. A broader ecological frame for wraparound highlights the need to include more natural supports on teams, to ensure backing from higher level administrators, and to emphasize client self-determination. Youths and families should be afforded leadership roles on teams and be supported by parent advocates. To extend the empowerment idea of wraparound beyond the individual case level, a clear commitment to social justice by working toward systems changes must be added.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Bows and ribbons, tape and twine: Wrapping the wraparound process for children with multi-system needs
Author: Rosenblatt, A.
The wraparound process for children with multi-system needs is one of the most innovative and popular reform efforts in children's services. Nonetheless, the articles in this special issue are indicative of a service reform process that is still maturing and evolving. In this commentary, three key questions regarding the wraparound process are posed: (a) What is wraparound? (b) What is the current state of research regarding wraparound services? and (c) What are the implications for the future? It is argued that the future of wraparound depends at least in part on: (a) carefully defining the wraparound process, including how to best integrate the process with reforms based on the principles of a comprehensive system of care; and (b) making a strong commitment at all levels to the process of cumulative knowledge, of building and creating innovative research and program efforts over time, one upon the other. It is concluded that a failure to invest in careful definition, refinement, implementation, and research on the wraparound process consitutes a failure to invest in children and families with multi-system needs.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Bridging positive youth development and mental health services for youth with serious behavior problems
Author: Bradshaw, C. P., Brown, J. S., & Hamilton, S. F.
Youth development approaches have grown in popularity, yet the appropriateness of these strategies for adolescents with serious behavior problems has rarely been addressed. Life-course research examining the onset and developmental course of problem behaviors suggests that youth with different patterns of behavior problems may not equally benefit from youth development interventions. This paper reviews contemporary perspectives on the positive youth development approach in light of multidisciplinary life-course research regarding the development of disruptive behavior problems. The wraparound case-management model is described as a potential framework for applying this research to support youth with serious behavior problems.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Brief violence interventions with community case management services are effective for high-risk trauma patients
Author: Aboutanos, M. B., Jordan, A., Cohen, R., Foster, R. L., Goodman, K., Halfond, R. W., Poindexter, R., Charles, R., Smith, S. C.,
BACKGROUND: Currently there are few data that brief violence intervention (BVI) and community case management services (CCMS) are effective for trauma patients admitted for interpersonal violence in terms of recidivism, service utilization, or alcohol abuse. The objective of this study is to assess outcomes for a cohort of young trauma patients in a prospective, randomized trial comparing BVI with BVI + CCMS. METHODS: Intentionally injured patients, aged 10 years to 24 years, admitted to a Level I trauma center were randomized to receive a brief in-hospital psychoeducational violence intervention alone (Group I) or in combination with a 6 months wraparound CCMS (Group II) that included vocational, employment, educational, housing, mental health, and recreational assistance. Recidivism, alcohol use, and hospital and community service utilization were assessed at 6 weeks (6W) and 6 months (6M). RESULTS: Seventy-five of 376 eligible injured patients were randomized into Group I and II. The two groups had similar demographics, injuries, and clinical outcomes. After discharge, percent clinic visits maintained was 57% in both the groups. Group II showed better hospital service utilization, CMS, and risk factor reduction at 6W and 6M. One patient in each group sustained a reinjury at 6M. CONCLUSIONS: In-hospital BVI with community wraparound case management interventions can improve hospital and community service utilization both short- and long-term for high-risk injured patients. Longer follow-up is needed to show sustained reduction.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Building a Quality Family Partner Foundation: Tips for Implementers
Author: Patricia Miles
This chapter covers recruiting, hiring, training, supervising and transitions stages in building strong family partner capacity.
Keywords: human resource, role, family partner

Building Databases and MIS to Support Wraparound Implementation
Author: Aggie Hale
This chapter describes using MIS software and covers managing and evaluating data and lessons learned.
Keywords: accountability, data, data system, system

Building on practice-based evidence: Using expert perspectives to define the wraparound process
Author: Walker, J. S., & Bruns, E. J.
OBJECTIVE: In order to expand the research base on effective community-based mental health treatments, methods are needed to define and evaluate promising interventions that have not been systematically developed and tested. In this report, the authors describe the results of an effort to better define the wraparound process for children and adolescents with serious emotional and behavioral problems. METHODS: A broad review of wraparound treatment manuals and model descriptions was conducted. With the help of a small group of experts, this review was synthesized into an initial description of the phases and activities of the wraparound process. This model was then presented to a multidisciplinary advisory panel of 31 experts on the wraparound process who provided structured and semistructured feedback. RESULTS: Overall, respondents expressed a high level of agreement with the proposed set of activities. For 23 of the 31 activities presented, there was unanimous or near-unanimous agreement (that is, one dissenter) that the activity was an essential component of the wraparound process. For 20 of the 31 activities, there was unanimous agreement that the description was phrased acceptably. A final model was created on the basis of feedback from reviewers. CONCLUSIONS: Results indicate that using the experience of a wide base of stakeholders to operationalize a complex model such as wraparound is feasible and holds many potential benefits, including building consensus in the field, improving service quality, and accelerating the incorporation of evaluation results into real-world practice.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Building Resilient Families and Communities: An Interview with Karl Dennis
Author: Kendziora, K. T.
In this exclusive interview one of the pioneers of the wraparound approach to providing youth and family services shares his insights on how this system of unconditional care can help build resilient families and communities. Karl Dennis, the executive director of Kaleidoscope, Inc., in Chicago, heads the first child welfare agency in the country to provide unconditional care for children. Mr. Dennis was one of the originators of intensive In-Home Family Preservation Services and Therapeutic Foster Care. The Kaleidoscope pediatric AIDS foster-care program, one of the nation’s first, has become a model for programs across the country. Since 1975, Mr. Dennis has also helped to orchestrate state initiatives to return children from out-of-state placements, providing services to thousands of children and their families.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Building the Child and Family Team
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Pat Miles
tool for identifying wraparound team members and natural supports
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, strength, need, culture

Building the Community Nexus: A Community Centered Approach to Planning and Design
Author: Bingler, S.
Recent research indicates that the goals (of producing management efficiencies to deliver community programs and infrastructure and more graduates) can be better achieved through a holistic model that supports the whole family and child by providing better access to wrap around services. Nexus planning is a process through which these services can be planned and coordinated all at once. Included are a full spectrum of the people, programs and places that support the complex systemic structure of child support and community life.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

California's Title IV-E Child Welfare Waiver Demonstration Project Evaluation: An Analysis of Wraparound in Alameda
Author: Ferguson, C. M.
This study is an evaluation of a Wraparound program implemented as part of California's Title IV-E Child Welfare Waiver Demonstration Project. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of Wraparound, in comparison to traditional child welfare services, at producing better outcomes for children in the child welfare system living in high-level group care, or at risk of such a placement setting. Wraparound in Alameda County is provided by Project Destiny, a collaboration between the county's Department of Children and Family Services and three private community-based children's services providers. Project Destiny can best be viewed as a managed care initiative, combining programmatic reforms (i.e., Wraparound) with fiscal reforms made possible under the Demonstration Project, to augment services available to children in high level care. The goal of Project Destiny's capitated system is to increase fiscal flexibility in order to decrease service fragmentation and increase effectiveness. Project Destiny uses a team structure comprised of the child and family, service professionals, and other significant individuals in the child's life. The data collection design for the study is a posttest-only control group design. Quantitative data on the outcome variables of child safety, placement stability, and permanence are the means with which comparisons were made between the group receiving Project Destiny (n = 121) and the comparison group receiving traditional child welfare services (n = 70). Child safety and placement data were drawn from a statewide administrative-level database for children participating in the study. Logistic regression and event history analysis were used to examine the following outcomes: substantiated maltreatment, number of placement moves, types of placement moves, types of placements, and exits from care. While the overall results do not provide resounding evidence as to the efficacy of Wraparound, they do suggest that Wraparound is having some positive impact on a number of child welfare outcome variables. Notably, children receiving Wraparound had greater odds of living in a more family-like setting at the end of the study than children receiving traditional child welfare services. The findings are discussed in terms of policy and practice and suggestions are made for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Care Management Entities: A Primer
Author: Center for Health Strategies, Inc.
This fact sheet outlines the core characteristics of Care Management Entities, which offer a centralized vehicle for coordinating the full array of needs for children and adolescents with complex behavioral health issues.
Keywords: finance, sustainability, state, model

Case management wraparound expenses: Five-year study
Author: Oliver, R. D., Nims, D. R., Hughey, A. W., & Somers, J. R.
Kentucky IMPACT is a unique program featuring interagency team planning, case management services, and individualized wraparound services for children with severe emotional disabilities and their families. A study was conducted concerning wraparound expense data from the first 5 years of Kentucky IMPACT program implementation. Significant differences were found between levels of wraparound expense and the additional variables of diagnosis, regional service capacity and population, and client length-of-service. No significant relationship was revealed between levels of wraparound expense and client age. The general parameters of wraparound expense for this population are also identified.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Case Rate Scan for Care Management Entities
Author: Center for Health Care Strategies, Inc. Submitted By: John Ossowski
This technical assistance tool discusses the application of case rate scans to the financing of Care Management Entities. A case rate scan is defined as a pricing method in which a flat amount covers a designated set of services on a per-diem or per-child basis. (Accessed from: http://www.chcs.org/usr_doc/Case_Rate_Scan_for_CMEs.pdf)
Keywords: cost, analysis, expenditure, expenditures, study, research

CHANGING ORGANIZATION CULTURE: DATA DRIVEN PARTICIPATORY EVALUATION AND REVISION OF WRAPAROUND IMPLEMENTATION
Author: Bertram, R. M., Schaffer, P., & Charnin, L.
Family members and professionals in a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Children’s Mental Health Systems of Care Initiative in Houston, Texas conducted a participatory evaluation to examine wraparound implementation. Results guided systematic, theory-based program revisions. By focusing through empirically derived frameworks for implementation, the evaluation team identified and generated useful data sources to support and improve wraparound provision. Despite working with a more diverse population in which youth displayed more severe behaviors than in similar grants, after 18 months more families received service and outcomes improved as fidelity scores advanced above the national mean.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Child and adolescent psychiatry: Current trends in the community treatment of seriously emotionally disturbed youths
Author: Huffine, C.
It is a pleasure to initiate this column on child and adolescent psychiatry. Psychiatrists and other mental health care professionals who work with children and adolescents have needed a forum for discussing issues related to community practice—in particular, for bringing innovations in community programs for youths into our professional dialogue. Through federal and private grants, programs have emerged that have realized the ideals of the original initiatives of the Child and Adolescent Service System Program (CASSP) for the community treatment of youths (1). These initiatives promote CASSP values and principles—that is, that care should be family centered, child focused, culturally competent, community based, and integrated. This system-of-care reform movement has been greatly advanced by The Children's Mental Health Initiatives Grants from the Center for Mental Health Services. These grants have created laboratories for experimenting with ever more effective ways of addressing the needs of our most challenging young people. Many of these programs address the fragmentation of services in poorly conceived systems of care. I hope this column will be a forum for those who have experience in integrating mental health services for children and adolescents with social services, juvenile justice programs, schools, child and adolescent medical services, and recreational programs for youths. I also hope the column can provide a forum for discussing ways that psychiatrists and other professionals can better ally with the consumers in the system of care for youths, including parents and older youths. Supporting families who care for challenging youths requires an understanding of culture and diversity in our communities. I am particularly eager to see this column become a forum for discussing how cultural competence is achieved in serving children and adolescents. Central to a discussion of system-of-care reform in child and adolescent services is the issue of individualized care for children and adolescents. A way to address the strengths and needs of youths has been termed the wraparound process. Innovators such as Karl Dennis, John Vandenberg, Vera Pena, and others have pioneered wraparound concepts over the past three decades (2,3,4,5). They have demonstrated that they could successfully maintain most youths in their communities by first focusing on the strengths the youths displayed and then addressing their specific needs. Most of this work has been done outside of psychiatry and outside of academic centers. The grant programs have created a vast amount of data on the effectiveness of the wraparound process. Research on these programs is ongoing. More specific programs, including multisystemic therapy for adjudicated youths (6) and multidimensional family therapy for substance abusers (7), have proven efficacy. These programs adhere to the core values and principles of the CASSP and share many features with wraparound concepts. In this first column I discuss the principles of a wraparound process and illustrate them by citing a program with which I am familiar.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Child and Family Crisis Plan
Author: Henderson Mental Health Center Submitted By: Sue Thomas
blank crisis plan template
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, crisis, safety

Child and Family Individualized Wraparound Plan
Author: Henderson Mental Health Center Submitted By: Sue Thomas
blank wraparound plan template
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, action, step, need, outcome, goal, goals

Children lost within the foster care system: Can wraparound service strategies improve placement outcomes?
Author: Clark, H. B., Lee, B., Prange, M. E., & McDonald, B. A.
The proportion of children with emotional and behavioral disturbances within the foster care system in the United States is continuing to increase. Many of these children experience numerous placement changes each year, often into extremely restrictive settings. The Fostering Individualized Assistance Program (FIAP) study examined the feasibility of applying a wraparound strategy to these children and their foster, biological and/or adoptive families. This FIAP wraparound strategy paralleled the foster care system and involved the clinical case management of a broad range of individually tailored services, driven by a wraparound team of adult key players in each child's life. This was a controlled study which involved the random assignment of 132 children (ages 7–15 years) to the FIAP wraparound group or to a group that received usual foster care services. We provide a description of the FIAP wraparound intervention and findings that support the efficacy of this strategy in improving the placement outcomes for children lost in the foster care system. Discussion focuses on systemic and intervention factors that may be improved upon to strengthen future individualized wraparound processes and evaluation/research efforts.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Children's Cabinets in Other States
Author: [not available]
This document lists the 23 states that have established Children's Cabinets.
Keywords: vision, mission, strategy, plan, MOU, information, share, legislation, law, policy, laws, policies

Choosing a Consultant to Support Your Wraparound Project
Author: Patricia Miles & The National Wraparound Initiative Advisory Group
Guide to choosing a Wraparound project consultant
Keywords: human resource, training, system, development

Client-directed wraparound: The client as connector in community collaboration
Author: Sparks, J. A., & Muro, M. L.
Systems of care emphasize the need for effective collaboration between community agencies assisting families where a child or adolescent is at risk of out-of-home placement. Unfortunately, community collaborations may not privilege the voices of family members, including the young person. Research affirms the critical importance of honoring clients' views in any change endeavor. Wraparound and client-directed, outcome-informed (CDOI) projects support this imperative, with CDOI offering client-report feedback measures to formally amplify clients' perspectives. The connection between these two distinct movements provides a philosophical and operational basis to create productive and even inspiring community partnerships.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Clinical Considerations for a Strength-Based Intake Assessment
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Janet McIntyre
Life areas to cover during intake assessment.
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, strength, need, culture

Clinician Job Description
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Hathaway-Sycamores Child and Fam
Arranger Clinician job description
Keywords: human resource, job description

Clinician Self-Rating Form
Author: [not available]
Keywords: human resource, training, coaching, coach, supervision, supervise

Co-production dynamics and time dollar programs in community-based child welfare initiatives for hard-to-serve youth and families
Author: Marks, M. B., & Lawson, H. A.
Hard-to-serve youth and families residing in high-poverty communities often have multiple, interlocking needs. These needs necessitate complex service models. The complex model described in this article combines a unique approach to wraparound services with a coproduction framework and related theories. The model aims to improve outcomes for vulnerable youth and their families, simultaneously strengthening communities by employing residents and engaging participants in community service. Examples derived from current pilot projects illustrate co-production's importance for other child welfare initiatives.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Collaboration with Other Agencies: Wraparound and Systems of Care for Children and Youths with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders
Author: Eber, L., & Keenan, S.
(From the chapter) Many youths with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) traverse through special education, mental health, juvenile justice, and child welfare with historically dismal outcomes. The need for collaborative approaches that link multiple stakeholders in efficient and effective interventions are demonstrated through the repeated failures of individual systems, such as education and mental health, to unilaterally effect positive change. This chapter describes the history and development of interagency systems of care and the wraparound approach, a widely used tool for building constructive relationships and support networks among children with EBD and their families, teachers, and other caregivers. Examples of models that recognize the importance of connecting families, schools, and human service partners to collaboratively address the comprehensive needs of students with emotional and behavioral challenges are provided. Emerging interagency school and community-based models that connect effective learning and behavior change with system-of-care principles are also discussed. Evaluation data of these initiatives are presented, as are recommendations for needed research to guide system development and practices across disciplines. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved) (chapter)
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Collaborative agency training for parent employees and professionals in a new agency addressing children's mental health
Author: Werrbach, G. B., Jenson, C. E., & Bubar, K.
This American article describes an 8-week training curriculum conducted jointly with parent employees and professionals in an agency providing services for children with serious emotional disabilities. The collaborative seminar was part of one rural programmes implementation of a family strengths based system of care in children's mental health. Describes the curriculum and provides an overview of lessons learned and implications for future parent–professional joint training.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Community Connections and Team Composition Questionnaire
Author: Washington Federation of Familie Submitted By: Washington Federation of Familie
tool for eliciting and recording information about sources of formal/informal support and stress
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, implement, indicators, progress, track, goal

Community Stories About Family Partners in Wraparound
Author: Marlene Penn
Marlene Penn shares three stories about engaging family partners in wraparound efforts—and how it benefited the community.
Keywords: human resource, role, family partner, profile

Community Supports for Wraparound Inventory
Author: [not available] Submitted By: National Wraparound Initiative
An Assessment of the Implementation Context for Wraparound
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development, outcome

Community Systems of Care for Children's Mental Health
Author: Chenven, M.
Although the future of the systems of care model continues to evolve, the core values of child psychiatry are well supported and well served in this emerging arena of public children's mental health service delivery. A substantial body of evidence supports the concepts and practices of family-driven care congruent with wraparound principles and practices. Individual and system outcomes data show efficacy for programs that integrate traditional professional services with consumer-centric wraparound approaches, such as mentoring, team decision making, and community-based services and supports. Integrative interagency practice, fostering cross-agency collaboration to address the needs of at-risk populations, has been shown to be central in providing supports for families and youth.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Comparing the Wraparound Process to Positive Behavioral Support: What We Can Learn
Author: Clark, H. B. H. M.
Two contemporary approaches in the provision of services for children with behavioral and/or emotional difficulties in their homes, schools, and communities are positive behavioral support (PBS) and the wraparound process. Both approaches have been developed in response to barriers encountered in services arenas. PBS emerged as a result of concerns regarding the use of aversive procedures and overly rigid consequence-based approaches for individuals with severe developmental disabilities (Horner et al., 1990). The wraparound process evolved in response to the expert-driven, deficit-oriented, and categorical model of service delivery that had permeated the child mental health and foster-care systems (VanDenBerg, 1993). Although the values and assumptions contained within PBS and the wraparound process have been well articulated, practitioners and researchers who support these approaches continue to work to improve the fidelity, replicability, and the effectiveness of them. In this article, we compare and contrast some characteristics of these two approaches. We also provide some suggestions that proponents of the two approaches might want to consider and expand on through dialogue regarding practice.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Comparison of Individualized Planning Techniques
Author: Wraparound Milwaukee Submitted By: Mary Jo Meyers
(technique) Comparison of three techniques for use in developing initial plans: bubble planning, storyboarding, and clock planning
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, priority, safety, need, outcome, goal

Comparison of Treatment as Usual and Wraparound Service Model
Author: [not available]
Crosswalk of differences between two service approaches
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, orient, orientation, family, youth

Completing the continuum of schoolwide positive behavior support: Wraparound as a tertiary-level intervention
Author: Eber, L., Hyde, K., Rose, J., Breen, K., McDonald, D., & Lewandowski, H.
Positive behavior support (PBS) is based on the core belief that all children can learn and succeed, and that schools, in partnership with families and communities, are responsible to identify and arrange the physical, social, and educational conditions that ensure learning. However, many schools find this to be a daunting task (Brown & Michaels, 2006; Hawken & O'Neill, 2006), especially with regard to students who have complex emotional-behavioral needs. Special education, although intended to be a support system for these students, often functions as an exclusionary default, with limited social and academic success (National Center for Education Statistics, 2005; Wagner, Newman, Cameto, Levine, & Garza, 2006). Improving educational outcomes for all students requires significant changes in how schools respond to students with complex needs, including application of research-based behavioral practices, and integration of community/family supports with school-based services. As described in previous chapters, application of PBS schoolwide is expected to improve schools' capacity to effectively educate the 1 –15% of students with emotional-behavioral and related learning challenges. We propose that the family-centered wraparound process (Burns & Goldman, 1999) is an essential component of schoolwide positive behavior support (SW-PBS) if schools are to ensure success for students who require comprehensive mental health supports. The wraparound approach provides a structure for schools to establish proactive partnership with families and community supports, a necessary component for arranging successful environments around students with complex emotional-behavioral needs. Families (including the student) are positioned as key informants and decision makers in prioritizing desired outcomes and strength-based strategies. Embracing such person-/family-centered values and techniques, the wraparound process results in uniquely tailored interventions that are carefully implemented with families and teachers in lead roles, ensuring contextual fit (Albin, Lucyshyn, Horner, & Flannery, 1996; Crone & Horner, 2003) and therefore increasing likelihood of effectiveness across home, school, and community.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Comprehensive community-based interventions for youth with severe emotional disorders: Multisystemic therapy and the wraparound process
Author: Burns, B. J., Schoenwald, S. K., Burchard, J. D., Faw, L., & Santos, A. B.
Two comprehensive community-based interventions for youth with severe emotional disorders are contrasted and compared. The interventions are multisystemic therapy (MST)—a brief but intensive, clinician-provided, and home-based treatment; and wraparound—a long-term approach to planning and coordinating the provision of both formal and informal services in the community. Both approaches are spreading rapidly across the country. As this occurs, it is important for families, clinicians, and policymakers to have sufficient information to understand the requirements and the research base for each. This paper provides a description of both MST and wraparound across multiple dimensions (i.e., origin, theory, target population, principles, role of family, cultural competence, staffing, training, quality monitoring, costs, and the evidence base). The respective similarities and differences are discussed and options for utilizing both for selected youth and families who require intensive and long-term care are explored briefly.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Connecting the Dots: Stages of Implementation, Wraparound Fidelity and Youth Outcomes
Author: Vicki Sprague Effland, Betty Walton, & Janet McIntyre
Several necessary system and organizational support conditions for wraparound have been identified (Walker et al. 2003). Yet, the relationship between these necessary system level conditions and wraparound fidelity has only recently begun to be examined. Similarly, few studies have included a measure of wraparound fidelity when examining the relationship between wraparound implementation and youth outcomes. The statewide implementation of a wraparound demonstration grant offers the opportunity to explore these relationships and to identify factors that predict improvement in functioning for youth receiving wraparound. Findings suggest that significant relationships exist between (1) the stage of development of necessary support conditions for wraparound and wraparound fidelity and (2) wraparound fidelity and improvement in youth outcomes.
Keywords: accountability, data, fidelity, assessment, measure

Connecting the dots: Stages of implementation, wraparound fidelity and youth outcomes
Author: Effland, V. S., Walton, B. A., & McIntyre, J. S.
Several necessary system and organizational support conditions for wraparound have been identified (Walker et al. 2003). Yet, the relationship between these necessary system level conditions and wraparound fidelity has only recently begun to be examined. Similarly, few studies have included a measure of wraparound fidelity when examining the relationship between wraparound implementation and youth outcomes. The statewide implementation of a wraparound demonstration grant offers the opportunity to explore these relationships and to identify factors that predict improvement in functioning for youth receiving wraparound. Findings suggest that significant relationships exist between (1) the stage of development of necessary support conditions for wraparound and wraparound fidelity and (2) wraparound fidelity and improvement in youth outcomes. Specific elements of wraparound (i.e., outcomes based and community based) and baseline needs and strengths (e.g., high levels of anxiety and conduct issues, poor functioning at home and in school, judgment, and risks) were found to predict a reduction in youth needs. Other unexpected relationships between youth outcomes and the cultural competence element of wraparound and being multi-racial were also discovered. These findings reinforce the importance of supporting high fidelity wraparound for youth and their families in a recovery focused behavioral health system.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

CONNECTING THE DOTS: STAGES OF IMPLEMENTATION, WRAPAROUND FIDELITY AND YOUTH OUTCOMES
Author: Vicki Sprague Effland, Betty A. Walton, & Janet S. McIntyre.
Several necessary system and organizational support conditions for wraparound have been identified (Walker et al. 2003). Yet, the relationship between these necessary system level conditions and wraparound fidelity has only recently begun to be examined. Similarly, few studies have included a measure of wraparound fidelity when examining the relationship between wraparound implementation and youth outcomes. The statewide implementation of a wraparound demonstration grant offers the opportunity to explore these relationships and to identify factors that predict improvement in functioning for youth receiving wraparound. Findings suggest that significant relationships exist between (1) the stage of development of necessary support conditions for wraparound and wraparound fidelity and (2) wraparound fidelity and improvement in youth outcomes. Specific elements of wraparound (i.e., outcomes based and community based) and baseline needs and strengths (e.g., high levels of anxiety and conduct issues, poor functioning at home and in school, judgment, and risks) were found to predict a reduction in youth needs. Other unexpected relationships between youth outcomes and the cultural competence element of wraparound and being multi-racial were also discovered. These findings reinforce the importance of supporting high fidelity wraparound for youth and their families in a recovery focused behavioral health system.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Connections Discharge Summary
Author: Connections Submitted By: Mollie Janssen
Form for summarizing a family's wraparound and post-wrap needs
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition

Connections Sample Ground Rules
Author: Connections Submitted By: Mollie Janssen
Sample ground rules
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, rule, ground rules

Connections Strengths Summary
Author: Connections Submitted By: Mollie Janssen
questions and blank form for eliciting strengths by life domain
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, strength, need, culture, youth

Consent Form to Release Information (Spanish)
Author: Wraparound Oregon
Keywords: language, interpretation, Spanish, translation, translate

Coverage of Behavioral Health Services for Children, Youth, and Young Adults with Significant Mental Health Conditions
Author: Cindy Mann & Pamela S. Hyde
This bulletin from SAMHSA and CMS highlights wraparound as an effective method to meet the needs of children, youth, and young adults with mental health conditions. The bulletin provides guidance to states on creating a benefit package to cover this population.
Keywords: research, review, state, model, finance, cost, analysis, expenditure, expenditures, study, service, support, array, access

Creating Community-Driven Wraparound
Author: Bob Jones
The King County Blended Funding Project (the Project) was created as part of a Robert Wood Johnson grant designed to meet the needs of children who had experienced years of failure in the mental health, child welfare, education and juvenile justice systems.
Keywords: principle, theory, guide, profile

Creativity Springboard
Author: Family Partnership Institute Submitted By: Brad Norman
examples of creative plan strategies using informal/natural supports
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan

Crisis Plan Worksheet
Author: Indiana Behavioral Health Choice Submitted By: Janet McIntyre
tools for developing strategies for crisis plans
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, crisis, safety

Crisis Plans
Author: Dawn Proj.- IN Behavioral Health Submitted By: Janet McIntyre
tips and example strategies for crisis planning
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, crisis, safety

Crisis Plans-- Setting the Expectation for Unconditional Care
Author: Patricia Miles Submitted By: Mary Jo Meyers
technique/tips, tool, and blank form for crisis planning
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, crisis, safety

Curbing violence in juvenile offenders with serious emotional and mental health needs: The effective utilization of wraparound approaches in an American urban setting
Author: Kamradt, B., & Meyers, M. J.
Discusses the use of the Wraparound process with juvenile offenders with emotional, behavioral, and mental health needs. The elements of the process are outlined. The history and outcomes of the Wraparound Milwaukee Project are discussed. Case examples from this project are given. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Current Information on Dropout Prevention: Ideas from the Practitioners and the Literature
Author: Martin, E. J., Tobin, T. J., & Sugai, G. M.
Findings from a review of recent research on dropout prevention were sent to school administrators and other practitioners, who were invited to describe prevention programs they were using to increase the number of at-risk students who graduate from high school or receive an equivalent credential. Interventions described in the literature and recommended by practitioners included offering alternative types of service delivery, enhancing preparation for postschool employment, improving interpersonal relationships between school and family members and among individuals at school, increasing respect and consideration shown by school staff members to students, and individualizing positive and function-based support for students with behavior or attendance problems. Suggestions for developing action plans based on the information gathered are given.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Customized Resource Bank
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Brad Norman
tool for putting together strengths, needs and supports
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, strength, need, culture

Customizing Health Homes for Children with Behavioral Health Challenges
Author: Sheila Pires
This report offers practical and financial approaches to health home customization based on intensive care coordination models using high fidelity wraparound that have emerged from systems of care in children’s behavioral health care.
Keywords: finance, sustainability, state, model

Debating "Persistence" an "Unconditional Care": Results of a Survey of Advisors of the National Wraparound Initiative
Author: Eric Bruns, Janet Walker, & The National Wraparound Initiative Advisory Group
Keywords: principle, theory

Deciphering the tower of babel: Examining the theory and paradigm base for wraparound, an emerging collaborative model
Author: Malysiak, R.
I present the results of a study that examined a theoretical and paradigmatic basis to better define fidelity in a wraparound approach to service delivery. I first examined the literature to clarify terms and to suggest a paradigmatic and theoretical base for the easily misinterpreted, value-laden philosophy of wraparound. Two deceptively simple constructs were identified and examined through a multi-case, multi-method design. Results suggested that wraparound is an emerging collaborative model based in critical and constructivist thought and in ecological systems theory. My study provides a preliminary but essential step in clarifying the process of implementation and evaluation of the wraparound approach.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Defining practice: Flexibility, legitimacy, and the nature of systems of care and wraparound
Author: Bruns, E. J., & Walker, J. S.
In human services, clear definition of key concepts and strategies is critical to facilitating training, implementation, and research. This article reflects on methods undertaken to specify the wraparound process for children and families, and considers lessons that may be relevant to defining the system of care concept.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Demographic, Clinical, and Geographic Predictors of Placement Disruption Among Foster Care Youth Receiving Wraparound Services
Author: Dana Weiner, Scott Leon, & Michael Stiehl
This study seeks to determine the impact of proximity to resources on the effectiveness of a wraparound program for stabilizing foster care placements among a sample of youth. The authors present a methodology for deriving proximity scores for individual clients using Geographic Information Systems technology, and incorporate this score into a model for predicting placement disruption among youth in foster care receiving services within a wraparound model aimed at preventing placement disruptions.
Keywords: setting, child welfare, study

Demographic, clinical, and geographic predictors of placement disruption among foster care youth receiving wraparound services
Author: Weiner, D. A., Leon, S. C., & Stiehl, M. J.
The effective delivery of wraparound depends upon the availability of a wide range of community-based services. This study seeks to determine the impact of proximity to resources on the effectiveness of a wraparound program for stabilizing foster care placements among a sample of youth. We present a methodology for deriving proximity scores for individual clients using Geographic Information Systems technology, and incorporate this score into a model for predicting placement disruption among youth in foster care receiving services within a wraparound model aimed at preventing placement disruptions. Cox Regression is used to predict length of time until placement disruption using clinical, demographic, and service proximity measures. Risk of placement disruption is predicted by trauma experiences, risk behaviors, and age, and is reduced by the presence of child strengths and proximity to resources. The impact of proximity to resources on placement disruption varies by land use type, suggesting that proximity exerts a greater impact on youth in rural and suburban areas than in urban areas where wraparound service delivery models may be able to overcome distance and other barriers. Implications for the implementation of wraparound programs as well as service system planning are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

DEMOGRAPHIC, CLINICAL, AND GEOGRAPHIC PREDICTORS OF PLACEMENT DISRUPTION AMONG FOSTER CARE YOUTH RECEIVING WRAPAROUND SERVICES
Author: Dana A. Weiner, Scott C. Leon, & Michael J. Stiehl.
The effective delivery of wraparound depends upon the availability of a wide range of community-based services. This study seeks to determine the impact of proximity to resources on the effectiveness of a wraparound program for stabilizing foster care placements among a sample of youth. We present a methodology for deriving proximity scores for individual clients using Geographic Information Systems technology, and incorporate this score into a model for predicting placement disruption among youth in foster care receiving services within a wraparound model aimed at preventing placement disruptions. Cox Regression is used to predict length of time until placement disruption using clinical, demographic, and service proximity measures. Risk of placement disruption is predicted by trauma experiences, risk behaviors, and age, and is reduced by the presence of child strengths and proximity to resources. The impact of proximity to resources on placement disruption varies by land use type, suggesting that proximity exerts a greater impact on youth in rural and suburban areas than in urban areas where wraparound service delivery models may be able to overcome distance and other barriers. Implications for the implementation of wraparound programs as well as service system planning are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Designing Care Management Entities for Youth with Complex Behavioral Health Needs – Implementation Guide Number 2
Author: Anglin, G., Swinburn, A., Foster, L., Brach, C., & Bergofsky, L.
This guide was produced by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to provide information about developing Care Management Entities (CMEs). Drawing on the experiences of CHIPRA quality demonstration states, the resource provides an introduction to CMEs, guidelines for assessing a state's implementation readiness and an overview of different CME design strategies. Also available on-line at: http://www.ahrq.gov/policymakers/chipra/demoeval/what-we-learned/implementation-guides/implementation-guide2/index.html
Keywords: implementation, standards

Developing a Monitoring and Feedback System for Wraparound Implementation: A Survey of NWI Advisors
Author: Eric Bruns, April Sather, Janet Walker, & Sarah Peterson
Keywords: research, evaluation, program, report

Developing a new system to measure outcomes in a service coordination program for youth with severe emotional disturbance
Author: Shannon, L. M., Walker, R., & Blevins, M.
This paper presents information on re-developing an outcome evaluation for a state-funded program providing service coordination utilizing wraparound to youth with severe emotional disturbance (SED) and their families. Originally funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Kentucky IMPACT program has existed statewide since 1990. Changing data needs and limitations of the original evaluation required revamping the program's data collection system. The new evaluation uses the extant knowledge base to improve: (1) design, (2) measures, and (3) utility. A pre-post design with multiple follow-ups provides the framework for data collection. An ecological framework provides a conceptual structure for selecting measures focusing on both the service recipients and their environment. Data collection via a personal digital assistant (PDA) ensures utility of the data for both consumers and researchers. Issues ranging from conceptualization to implementation of the project as well as lessons learned are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Developing Effective Reactive Crisis Plans
Author: Indiana Behavioral Health Choice Submitted By: Janet McIntyre
Tips/techniques, blank form, and sample crisis plan
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, crisis, safety

Developing Health Homes for Children with Serious Emotional Disturbance: Considerations and Opportunities
Author: Moses, K., Klebonis, J., & Simons, D., Center for Health Care Strategies Submitted By: John Ossowski
Children with SED are different from adults with mental health issues. This brief describes those differences and how they can be incorporated in the development of Medicaid health homes for this group. (Accessed from: http://www.chcs.org/usr_doc/Developing_Health_Homes_for_SED_02_24_14.pdf)
Keywords: system, development, service, support, array, access

DEVELOPING QUALITY INDICATORS FOR FAMILY SUPPORT SERVICES IN COMMUNITY TEAM-BASED MENTAL HEALTH CARE
Author: Serene Olin, S., Kutash, K., Pollock, M., Burns, B. J., Kuppinger, A., Craig, N., Purdy, F., Armusewicz, K., Wisdom J., & Hoagwo
Quality indicators for programs integrating parent-delivered family support services for children’s mental health have not been systematically developed. Increasing emphasis on accountability under the Affordable Care Act highlights the importance of quality-benchmarking efforts. Using a modified Delphi approach, quality indicators were developed for both program level and family support specialist level practices. These indicators were pilot tested with 21 community-based mental health programs. Psychometric properties of these indicators are reported; variations in program and family support specialist performance suggest the utility of these indicators as tools to guide policies and practices in organizations that integrate parent-delivered family support service components.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Developing Relationships That Build Resiliency: Including Peers in the Wraparound Process
Author: Gipson, V., Ortiz-Self, L., & Cobb-Roberts, D.
Recounts the story of one young man's wraparound team, composed of and organized by his friends, to illustrate the positive influence that peers can have when they are involved in the wraparound process. Provides practical suggestions for recruiting peers and for roles they can play on the team.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Developing Strategies
Author: Wraparound Milwaukee Submitted By: Mary Jo Meyers
tips/technique for stimulating creative thinking during strategy development
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, crisis, safety

Developing Support Systems for Youth with and without Disabilities
Author: Price, L., & Edgar, E.
Support services to prevent dropping out of at-risk students include family wraparound services, individual counseling and psychiatry, intensive in-patient treatment, and residential placements. An essential ingredient, interagency collaboration requires common understanding of purposes and goals, communication, and group process skills.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Developing the Mental Health Workforce: Review and Application of Training Approaches from Multiple Disciplines
Author: Lyon, A. R., Stirman, S. W., Kerns, S. E. U., & Bruns, E. J.
Strategies specifically designed to facilitate the training of mental health practitioners in evidence-based practices (EBPs) have lagged behind the development of the interventions themselves. The current paper draws from an interdisciplinary literature (including medical training, adult education, and teacher training) to identify useful training and support approaches as well as important conceptual frameworks that may be applied to training in mental health. Theory and research findings are reviewed, which highlight the importance of continued consultation/support following training workshops, congruence between the training content and practitioner experience, and focus on motivational issues. In addition, six individual approaches are presented with careful attention to their empirical foundations and potential applications. Common techniques are highlighted and applications and future directions for mental health workforce training and research are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Developing, Financing and Sustaining County-Driven Wraparound in Butler County, Ohio
Author: Neil Brown
Keywords: finance, sustainability, local, model

Developing, Financing, and Sustaining Wraparound: Models for Implementation
Author: Patricia Miles
Keywords: finance, sustainability

DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A WRAPAROUND PARENT PARTNER FIDELITY TOOL
Author: Polinsky, M. L., Levine, M. H., Pion-Berlin, L., Torres, A., & Garibay, J.
Parent partners are parents or caregivers such as foster parents who have had success in dealing with a difficult child in a child welfare, mental health, or probation system and who become key players on Wraparound teams for families with youths with emotional or behavioral disabilities who are in out-of-home care. Although many studies have been conducted on the Wraparound model, none of them have described the parent partner’s role and fidelity to the model. The Parent Partner Fidelity Tool (PPFT) was developed to address this gap in Wraparound research; it is the first tool designed to measure parent partner adherence to the Wraparound model and identify parent partner training and support needs. The 28-item PPFT captures parent partner activities related to the four Wraparound phases designated by the National Wraparound Initiative: engagement, planning, implementation, and transition. Similar PPFT versions are completed by Wraparound facilitators, parent partners, and parents/caregivers to provide multiple perspectives on the parent partner’s work. The PPFT pilot testing project was conducted with 14 California Wraparound programs. Analyses of the 585 responses showed good reliability and validity for the PPFT, indicating that it is a psychometrically sound tool.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Development of an outcome measurement tool for a teen parent wraparound program
Author: Fries, D., Carney, K. J., Blackman-Urteaga, L., & Savas, S. A.
This article chronicles the search for and development of an outcome measurement tool for teen parents receiving community-based wraparound services. The criteria for selecting functional assessment tools available in the literature is presented along with the barriers experienced in using two of these well-cited tools. The rationale for in-house tool design with a population crossing adolescent and adult development, the domains, sample items, pilot test results, and beginning evidence of inter-rater reliability (0.87) are presented. (Contains 1 table and 5 figures.)
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Differences between Formal and Informal Supports for Families
Author: Indiana Behavioral Health Choice Submitted By: Janet McIntyre
tips/techniques for identifying natural/informal supports
Keywords: tool, orient, planning, plan, orientation, family, youth

Direct Support Services in Wraparound
Author: Tim Penrod
Direct Support services are the flexible, creative, community-based services that help put an effective wraparound plan into action.
Keywords: human resource, role, youth partner

Diverting multi-problem youth from juvenile justice: Investigating the importance of community influence on placement and recidivism
Author: Hamilton, Z. K., Sullivan, C. J., Veysey, B. M., & Grillo, M.
In the U.S., diversion has increasingly become one of the most utilized alternatives to detention of delinquent youth. Programs providing diversion can vary greatly. Variations in program design make it difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of program outcomes. Utilizing hierarchical linear modeling, this study examines variations in outcome for ten program sites of the New York State MH/JJ Diversion Project. Program and youth predictors were evaluated on two outcomes: out-of- community placement and recidivism. At the individual level, significant mental health and substance abuse problems, age, prior placements, and use of wraparound funds were predictive of youth placements, while significant substance abuse problems were predictive of recidivism. Program variations were found to have a significant impact on youth outcomes. Specifically, sites providing direct (or "in house") care had significantly reduced rates of placement. Study results and implications for future research are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Does Team Based Planning Work for Older Adolescents?
Author: Janet Walker & Celeste Moser
An article in the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal reviews studies of the effectiveness of wraparound on adolescents.
Keywords: research, full text

DOES TEAM-BASED PLANNING “WORK” FOR ADOLESCENTS? FINDINGS FROM STUDIES OF WRAPAROUND
Author: Janet S. Walker, Michael D. Pullmann, Celeste L. Moser, & Eric J. Bruns.
Human service and educational agencies often convene interdisciplinary teams to work collaboratively with adolescents and their parents or caregivers. However, research on adolescent development suggests that it may be difficult to successfully engage adolescents this kind of team-based planning. This article focuses on wraparound as an example of a team planning process, and uses data from several sources to reflect on questions about whether—and under what conditions—collaborative teams are successful in engaging young people—and their caregivers—in planning.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Does Wraparound Work for Older Adolescents?
Author: Janet Walker & Celeste Moser
This article focuses on wraparound as an example of a team planning process, and uses data from several sources to reflect on questions about whether—and under what conditions—collaborative teams are successful in engaging young people—and their caregivers—in planning.
Keywords: principle, theory, study

Early-Stage Wraparound Readiness: Initial Community and Stakeholder Commitment and Awareness
Author: National Wraparound Initiative
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development

Eco-Map
Author: North Carolina System of Care Submitted By: Jan Marckiewicz
Visual for eliciting and describing social support and relationships
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, implement, indicators, culture, youth

Eco-Map
Author: Equipo Submitted By: Kathy Lazear
tool for recording and visualizing social connections
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, implement, indicators, culture, youth

Economic grand rounds: the cost of collaboration: predictors of hours spent in collateral contacts
Author: Gordon, M., Antshel, K. M., & Lewandowski, L.
Collateral contacts, while at the heart of wraparound care, are time consuming and often nonreimbursable. This column presents data from a study of 1,639 child patients. It examined whether the amount of time that clinicians spent in collateral activities could be predicted by demographic variables, child diagnosis, parental psychopathology or family history of mental disorders, or staff variables. For every 60 minutes of direct patient contact, approximately 20 minutes of collateral activities were performed by the clinician. The best predictors of spending time in collateral activities were having parents who were not married, a mother with depression or anxiety, a child patient with a history of substance misuse or abuse, and a child patient with a history of maltreatment.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Effective Crisis Planning
Author: Indiana Behavioral Health Choice Submitted By: Janet McIntyre
Tips/techniques for crisis planning
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, crisis, safety

Effectively addressing mental health issues in permanency-focused child welfare practice
Author: Ornelas, L. A., Silverstein, D. N., & Tan, S.
The purpose of this paper is two-fold: to highlight to the professional community the ongoing and shifting mental health needs of children exiting the child welfare system into permanent plans, dismissed from public caseloads yet still much in need of services, and, to present a model of one agency's integrated, outpatient intervention with promising preliminary data. The model offers a specialized; effective approach to the field to address the needs of families built by adoption and relative caregiving. The increasing number of adoptions, and relative and near-kin placements, mandate that competent, lifelong services to children and their permanent families correspondingly increase. This practice model poses one example of translating this responsibility into action, so that these children are discharged not just to one permanent family, but also with a plan for permanent competent support.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Effectiveness of the wraparound process for children with emotional and behavioral disorders: A meta-analysis
Author: Suter, J. C., & Bruns, E. J.
Wraparound is a team-based service planning and coordination process intended to improve outcomes for children and youth with serious emotional and behavioral disorders and support them in their homes, schools, and communities. Given the substantial resources devoted to implementing wraparound, a meta-analysis of outcome studies was conducted to better understand current empirical support for this process. A literature search identified seven studies between 1986 and 2008 that documented the effects of youth receiving wraparound compared to control groups. Mean treatment effects across outcome domains ranged from medium for youth living situation (0.44) to small for mental health outcomes (0.31), overall youth functioning (0.25), school functioning (0.27), and juvenile justice-related outcomes (0.21). The overall mean effect size across studies was 0.33. Interpretation of results was complicated by the lack of consistent documentation of implementation fidelity across studies and conditions, variations in target population and intended outcomes, and methodological concerns. The authors conclude that, though the published wraparound research base is expanding and findings are largely positive, it continues to be in a preliminary state of development. However, there are insufficient data to support calls for wraparound's acceptance or dismissal based on the strength of existing studies.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

EFFECTIVENESS OF WRAPAROUND VERSUS CASE MANAGEMENT FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS: RESULTS OF A RANDOMIZED STUDY
Author: Bruns, E., Pullman, M., Sather, A., Brinson, R., & Ramey, M.
In this study, we compared service experiences and outcomes for youths with serious emotional disorder (SED) randomly assigned to care coordination via a defined wraparound process (n = 47) versus more traditional intensive case management (ICM; n = 46) The wraparound group received more mean hours of care management and services; however, there ultimately were no group differences in restrictiveness of residential placement, emotional and behavioral symptoms, or functioning. Wraparound implementation fidelity was found to be poor. Organizational culture and climate, and worker morale, were poorer for the wraparound providers than the ICM group. Results suggest that, for less-impaired youths with SED, less intensive options such as ICM may be equally effective to poor-quality wraparound delivered in the absence of wraparound implementation supports and favorable system conditions.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Efficacy of wraparound services for in-home and foster children
Author: Patton, R. A.
Early studies in the treatment for children diagnosed with SED concluded that there were gaps in service delivery (Lewit, 1995). In 1984, wraparound programs were initiated to bridge the gaps between services among providers and included the family as an integral part of treatment. Previous research on wraparound programs focused on service providers and costs. The purpose of this study was to compare children living at home with children living in foster care while receiving services through the Erie County Wraparound Program to determine if the stress of being removed from a home would influence outcomes. This study presented analysis of a longitudinal, archival data of 2,134 children between the ages of 3 and 21 who received wraparound services in the Erie County Wraparound Initiative between June 1998 and October 2003. Of this data set, 86 children were matched on age, sex, and diagnosis. Length of time and positive outcomes (e.g. legal incidents, type of discharge, out of home placements, and hospitalizations) were examined when comparing the two groups. There was no statistical significance for length of time in the program. There were no differences for hospitalizations, discharge, or legal incidents. Foster care children were more likely to have experienced an out of home placement than children living at home. This study also examined if younger children (ages 2-11) would have a more positive outcome than older children (ages 12-18). There were no differences in the matched group. When examining the larger data set, younger children were more likely to have a positive outcome than the older children. These findings suggest that children living in foster care have similar outcomes as those children living at home. This may be attributed to resiliency in children which was not measured. Children living at home may have different stressors that affected outcome (e.g., ongoing abuse or neglect or chaos in the home). Also, these results may be explained by the quality of the community foster care system.
Keywords: http://gradworks.umi.com/33/05/3305693.html
EMQ Children & Family Services: Transformation from Residential Services to Wraparound
Author: F. Jerome Doyle, Eleanor Castillo, Laura Champion, & Darrell Evora
EMQ Children & Family Services (aka Eastfield Ming Quong) is a private, not-for-profit community-based organization that provides a wide range of services, from addiction prevention to wraparound and Rate Classification Level (RCL) 14 group home care (aka residential treatment services), in four major counties throughout California: (a) Santa Clara, (b) Sacramento, (c) San Bernardino, and (d) Los Angeles. It also provides foster care services in 20 other counties. The agency is over a century old, founded in 1867 with roots as an orphanage (Home of Benevolence, later known as Eastfield’s Children Center) and a rescue mission for Chinese girls (the Presbyterian Mission Home later known as Ming Quong) founded in 1874. In 1970, Jerry Doyle became Executive Director of Eastfield Children’s Center. At that time, the agency had an annual budget of approximately $300,000 to provide residential treatment. In 1987, Eastfield and Ming Quong merged to become Eastfield Ming Quong. Prior to becoming the first wraparound provider in California in 1994, EMQ operated 130 RCL 14 residential treatment beds, at a cost of $95,000 per year per child. The most common primary diagnosis was related to disruptive behaviors (47%), with some type of depressive disorder as the second most common. The outcomes for these youth, after an average of 18 months of service, reflected the general “treatment as usual” outcomes. Today, residential treatment revenue represents 5% of a $55 million annual revenue stream, as compared to 72% of a $12 million annual revenue stream prior to the implementation of wraparound. The purpose of this article is twofold: 1) to present a case study of how a child-serving organization transformed itself from residential to innovative, community-based services; and 2) to share issues revealed in the process of implementing wraparound. The article contains three major sections including Introduction, Current Operations, and Tips to Implement Wraparound, as well as a final section that includes Lesson Learned. Throughout this article, we will reflect on the significant systems change required to implement wraparound.
Keywords: finance, sustainability

Enabling and empowering practices of Kentucky's school-based family resource centers: a multiple case study
Author: Kalafat, J.
This paper describes a component of a multimethod evaluation of a statewide school-based Family Resource Center (FRC) program in Kentucky. The FRC program is a multisite statewide initiative consisting of school-based centers that were intended to establish linkages among schools, communities and families; and, to provide or broker wraparound services for families that would enhance children's readiness to learn. The evaluation is a utilization-focused (Utilization-focused evaluation: The new century text 1997) study that employed a multiple case study design to identify and understand family support interventions that enabled and empowered families to access resources on their own behalf and participate in the educational process. Results from the case studies provided a description of coordinators' enabling and empowering interventions and their impact on families. The results also contributed to a Coordinator Training Institute and a Survival Manual for new coordinators.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Engaging and Involving Youth in Wraparound
Author: Tammy Cherry & Janet Walker
The YES Program is a collaboration between Placer County Adult System of Care, Children’s System of Care, and Whole Person Learning.
Keywords: principle, theory

Engaging and Involving Youth in Wraparound: Poll
Author: [poll from webinar by Tammy Cherry & Janet Walker]
Poll from webinar about engaging and involving youth in Wraparound.
Keywords: principle, theory

Erie County Wraparound Collaborative Family Service Plan
Author: Erie County Wraparound
Sample comprehensive plan
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, action, step, need, outcome, goal

Ethical Guidlines for Wraparound Facilitators
Author: Wraparound Milwaukee (http://county.milwaukee.gov/WraparoundMilwaukee.htm)
This document was produced by Wraparound Milwaukee (http://county.milwaukee.gov/WraparoundMilwaukee.htm) as an ethical guideline for staff working in wraparound.
Keywords: implementation, standards, training, coaching, coach, supervision, supervise, supervisor

Ethical issues in the provision of wraparound services
Author: Bowden, J. A.
Although ethical dilemmas abound in all clinical settings to one degree or another, a particular ethical challenge is created when mental health services are provided in clients' homes or in the community setting. Wraparound services in Pennsylvania target children and adolescents with mental health needs and are provided in clients' homes or schools. Despite the fact that these types of services are replete with ethical traps for the clinicians who provide them, little research addressing the possibilities of inherent ethical problems exists. Consequently, this study aimed to explore such issues and fill this gap in the professional literature. One hundred eight (108) wraparound workers were surveyed, using a three part questionnaire, to determine the extent to which academic training received in ethics, academic discipline, major area of study and years of experience working in wraparound services predicted the ability to make decisions congruent with current professional Ethical Codes of Conduct. A factor analysis was also conducted on Part II of a questionnaire, based on one used by Borys and Pope (1989) to establish the presence of their three factors and a theorized fourth factor termed confidentiality. Results from the multiple regression analysis indicated that none of the independent variables significantly predicted ethical decision making. Additionally, while the factors derived in the factor analysis included a confidentiality factor as theorized, none of the loadings were consistent with the Borys and Pope (1989) findings. The four factors derived from this study seemed to indicate that this sample attended more to the scale of the ethical violation described rather than to a categorical judgment of ethical violation as defined in the Borys and Pope (1989) study. These results may indicate that the majority of wraparound workers have a greater awareness of ethical decision making than was believed and, as a group, these providers report the confidence, as well as training, awareness and knowledge of professional ethics to guide their practice. Results are discussed in terms of sampling limitations and differences between this study and the Borys and Pope (1989) study and the possibility of a social desirability bias influencing subject responding. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Evaluating the effectiveness of wraparound services in meeting the predetermined goals of youth with emotional and behavioral disorders
Author: Renzaglia-Weir, M. J.
This study was designed to identify demographic characteristics and risk factors of youth served in a two-county wraparound program and to determine what service delivery patterns could predict successful completion of the youths' predetermined goals. A review of the wraparound plans for one year was conducted for 80 youth who attended an alternative school program. This review included documentation of family and mental health risk factors and a collection of demographic data. Wraparound services were recorded as to the type, frequency, duration, and intensity of services provided over the year. Results indicated the most common services provided were school-based incentives (e.g., computer time), educational supports (e.g., tutoring), and domestic safety and health (e.g., fire alarms). No significant demographics or risk factors were identified to predict successful completion of wraparound goals. In addition, results indicated that there were no significant differences in service delivery patterns between the goals met and goals unmet groups. This study further defined the characteristics and risk factors that are associated with youth served by systems of care. In addition, service delivery patterns associated with systems of care were identified. Future research should focus on extending the results of the current study by using a more diverse population, examining fidelity of implementation of systems of care, and more fully defining effective service delivery patterns. Although, no significant results were found, this study provided a first attempt at identifying effective wraparound services. On a practical level, this study indicated a need to evaluate services given by this wraparound programs to make them more individualized and diverse. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Evaluating the Vermont system of care: Outcomes associated with community-based wraparound services
Author: Bruns, E. J., Burchard, J. D., & Yoe, J. T.
Evaluation of innovative community-based interventions is becoming a high priority for child and adolescent mental health service system research. The present study examined outcomes for a sample of Vermont children (N=27) experiencing emotional and behavioral problems and receiving individualized, wraparound services. One year after initiation of wraparound care, incidence of negative behaviors rated as placing a child at risk of removal from the community had decreased significantly, compliance behavior had increased, and a significant decline in Total Problem Behavior scores on the Child Behavior Checklist was observed. In addition, though 70% of the participants had previously required inpatient or residential treatment, 89% were maintained in the community after one year of services, and the total cost of services was less than that of out-of-state residential care. Although further comparative research is needed, this study suggests that for many of these children, wraparound services may be a more efficient intervention than long-term psychiatric hospitalization or residential treatment.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Evaluating wraparound services for seriously emotionally disturbed youth: Pilot study outcomes in Georgia
Author: Copp, H. L., Bordnick, P. S., Traylor, A. C., & Thyer, B. A.
Since the early 1990s, intervention strategies designed to preserve the family system while serving children diagnosed with severe emotional disturbances (SED) have been on the rise. Many of these strategies sought to provide families with comprehensive approaches that link various agencies and services, thus providing a complete system of care. The term wraparound services was coined to describe these approaches. However, evaluation studies of the outcomes of these programs remains limited. In order to assess the impact of wraparound services, outcome evaluation programs need to be implemented and their feasibility assessed. This paper focuses on the feasibility and implementation of a computer-based field assessment system and the ability to provide empirically based feedback to the programs. In addition, an assessment of 15 participating children and families, comparing selected aspects of clinical functioning at intake and 6-month follow-up, is presented and discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Evaluation of a Congressionally Mandated Wraparound Demonstration
Author: Bickman, L., Smith, C. M., Lambert, E. W., & Andrade, A. R.
In order to determine whether expenditures for mental health could be reduced and quality improved, Congress mandated that the Department of Defense conduct a demonstration project utilizing a wraparound mental health service system for child and adolescent military dependents. A longitudinal quasiexperimental design was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the demonstration. The results showed that children in the Wraparound Group received more wraparound services than those in the treatment as usual (TAU) Comparison Group. These services included case management, in-home treatment, and other nontraditional services. The Demonstration also provided better continuity of care. Multiple methods were used to investigate the impact of wraparound. Both groups showed some improvement on some measures but there were no differences between the groups in functioning, symptoms, life satisfaction, positive functioning, or sentinel events. Regardless of which statistical model was used to estimate costs, the Demonstration was also more expensive. The higher level of expenditures for the Wraparound group was a result of some expensive traditional care and the addition of nontraditional services. Several possible explanations of these results are provided.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Evaluation of a wraparound process for children exposed to family violence
Author: Crusto, C. A., Lowell, D. I., Paulicin, B., Reynolds, J., Feinn, R., Friedman, S. R., & Kaufman, J. S.
Numerous programs have been established to help children who have experienced or are experiencing family violence, but few of these programs have been systematically evaluated. To contribute to the field's understanding of interventions for young children exposed to family violence and their families, we evaluated an intervention that offers comprehensive assessment, targeted caregiver-child intervention, individualized service planning, and care coordination. Baseline-to-discharge results revealed (1) a significant decrease over time in the number of potentially traumatic events that children experienced, including family and nonfamily violence events, (2) significant decreases over time in children's post-traumatic stress-intrusive thoughts and post-traumatic stress-avoidance behaviors, (3) significant decreases in self-reported stress associated with the parenting role among caregivers, (4) favorable ratings of services by caregivers, and (5) high levels of service receipt.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Evaluation of the Care Management Oversight Project
Author: Strech, G., Harris, B., & Vetter, J.
Evaluation from Oklahoma shows better functioning and reduced costs for youth receiving case management/wraparound versus controls.
Keywords: program, evaluation, report

Evaluation of the Care Management Oversight Project
Author: Geneva Strech, Betty Harris, & John Vetter
This evaluation from Oklahoma shows better functioning and reduced costs for youth receiving case management/wraparound versus controls.
Keywords: program, evaluation, report, finance, sustainability, state, model

Evaluation of wraparound services for severely emotionally disturbed youths
Author: Mears, S. L., Yaffe, J., & Harris, N. J.
Objectives: Services to children and adolescents with a severe emotional disturbance (SED) have long been inadequate. The wraparound approach has emerged as a promising practice that could address the needs of children with SED and their families through a strength-based, individualized, family-focused team process that emphasizes flexible service planning. This study compares the outcomes of youth receiving the wraparound approach with youth receiving traditional child welfare case management. Method: Child behavior and community integration outcomes were measured at intake and at 6 months in services. Results: Results indicated that youth receiving the wraparound approach showed significant improvement on the Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS) when compared with youth receiving traditional child welfare services. Results also showed that youth receiving traditional child welfare services experienced significantly fewer placements. However, neither group showed significant differences on other clinical or functional outcomes. Conclusions: Results are discussed, as well as applications to social work practice, study limitations, and recommendations for additional research on wraparound.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Evidence-based treatments for trauma among culturally diverse foster care youth: Treatment retention and outcomes
Author: Weiner, D. A., Schneider, A., & Lyons, J. S.
This study describes the implementation of three evidence-based treatments addressing traumatic stress symptoms within a wraparound foster care program in Illinois. Child–Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), and Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress (SPARCS) were implemented with a racially diverse sample of youth ages 3–18 at six agencies. Culturally sensitive adaptations were made to treatment approaches to improve client retention and outcomes. Data analyses revealed no racial differences in retention in the program and no differences in outcomes between minority youth exposed to the intervention and other participants. All three evidence-based treatments were effective in reducing symptoms and improving functioning among minority youth. Implementation issues, including challenges and culturally competent accommodations, are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Evolution of Wraparound Services at The Menninger Clinic.
Author: Adkins, S. L., Safier, E. J., & Parker, N. N.
The authors focus on the development of a wraparound program at The Menninger Clinic. This program explores alternatives to long-term hospitalization and residential treatment and provides comprehensive community-based services. After describing the history and evolution of this program, the authors highlight its current components (i.e., diagnostic understanding; assessment of the client's and family's strengths; identification of helpful functions of hospital or residential placement; crisis planning; family-centered community team; flexible funding; criteria for evaluating the plan's success). Each of these components contributes to a process that provides a high level of individualized treatment outside a hospital or residential setting. This process has provided a format for collaborating with families, community providers, schools, and managed care companies. It also integrates an understanding of developmental psychopathology with solution-focused, pragmatic approaches to behavior change.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Examining the Role of Social Network Intervention as an Integral Component of Community-Based, Family-Focused Practice
Author: Cox, K. F.
Social network intervention aimed at bolstering the informal supports of high risk families is recognized as a common element of community-based, family-focused practice models, such as intensive family preservation services (IFPS), multisystemic therapy (MST), and the wraparound process. The empirical research basis for these practice models is examined, with an eye toward discerning the extent to which network intervention is identified as a critical component of comprehensive service. Results reveal that few studies make clear the degree to which treatment adhered to a focus on natural network enhancement or the development of informal resources. Those that did, suggest that relatively few families received this form of ecologically-oriented intervention. Consequently, this body of practice research offers insufficient evidence of the benefits or limitations associated with network facilitation with multi-need families. Explanations for these findings are explored and directions for future research are recommended.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Example RFP for Title IV-E Demonstration Project
Author: State of Tennessee, Department of Children's Services
This RFP for Title IV-E Demonstration Project is from the State of Tennessee. It illustrates a schedule of events, proposal requirements, and general contracting information and requirements.
Keywords: research, evaluation

Examples of Individualized Planning Techniques-- Bubble Planning
Author: Wraparound Milwaukee Submitted By: Mary Jo Meyers
tool and technique for developing an initial plan
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, action, step, need, outcome, goal

Examples of Individualized Planning Techniques-- Clock Planning
Author: Wraparound Milwaukee Submitted By: Mary Jo Meyers
tool and technique for describing needs and developing strategies
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, priority, safety, need, outcome, goal

Examples of Individualized Planning Techniques-- Story Boarding
Author: Wraparound Milwaukee Submitted By: Mary Jo Meyers
technique for building initial plan that matches needs, strengths, and strategies
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, priority, prioritize, need, outcome, goal

Exercises in a Resilient System of Care, Cultural Competency, and the Wraparound Process
Author: Pina, V. O., & VanDenBerg, J.
Explores a socially resilient system of care and two key elements of the wraparound process: cultural competence and discovering family strengths, preferences, voice, and choice. Demonstrates the basic elements of an organized, resilient system of care and community strengths and includes exercises in social resilience, cultural competence, and the wraparound process.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Exploratory study of a model for evaluating wrap-around services: Characteristics of children and youth exhibiting various degrees of success
Author: Bartley, J. A.
The rational for developing a model to evaluate programs providing wrap-around services to children and youth with behavioral disorders was addressed in this study. A review of recent literature indicated that despite the number of programs providing services, concise models for evaluating the efficacy of services provided and the benefit of these services was lacking. A model for evaluating programs based on the principles of wrap-around was developed and applied to an existing program that had been providing services for 2 years. With the model, existing information was available to address 4 of the 7 principles. The study involved 25 subjects of school age with two commonly referred diagnoses, ADHD and ODD/CD/D. Progress was analyzed by using Child Behavior Checklists (SCICA, PRF, and TRF), The Parenting Stress Index, treatment plan goal achievement and cost of services. All of the subjects were able to demonstrate some progress while receiving wrap-around services. Younger children and children with ADHD were not referred for more restrictive placement. Of the most at-risk group, the 12–15 year olds, 3 were referred for residential placement, 1 was referred for partial day treatment and 1 dropped out of school. Children with ADHD were judged to be making more progress in the areas measured except in adaptive behaviors in the school setting and the Parent and Child Domains on the PSI. The treatment for children with ADHD cost about half of that for children with ODD/CD/D. Several points in a complete evaluation plan could not be addressed with existing data. In the future sources of data for these points need to be found. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Exploring juvenile diversion in Ohio: With implications for policy & practice supporting evidence-based practice and comprehensive strategy---multi-systemic therapy (mst) and wraparound
Author: Sheppard, V. C.
Public policy guiding practices in the U.S. juvenile justice system has at its core two paramount objectives – to protect the public from young criminals and to find ways to manage young offenders so they discontinue antisocial or criminal behavior (Bonta, 1996). One pressing need is identifying specific types of juvenile services that work best for first-time and non-violent offenders (Carney & Buttell, 2003). Use of community-based, juvenile diversion services is one way of not only managing juveniles who get in trouble, it may be used to turn young lives headed for destruction into vessels of potential. Diversion occurs when the courts use some alternative to formally processing or committing youth to the juvenile justice system (Bynum & Thompson, 2007). The constant struggle in research is identifying what type of diversionary programming works for each individual. This study continues the exploration of the effectiveness of comprehensive diversion strategies aimed at first-time and non-violent youthful offenders by surveying juvenile diversion programs in counties across the state of Ohio. The purpose of this study is twofold: first, to determine whether counties that receive funding from the state of Ohio are designing and implementing juvenile diversion programs that are evidence-based; and second to determine what demographic variations predict the absence or existence of evidence-based components in practice. Data will be obtained via using an Internet survey, telephone interviews and/or paper surveys, as necessary. Quantitative analysis will be employed. In addition to the survey questionnaire, demographic information will be gathered on all Ohio counties. Information regarding diversion funding, population demographics, high school graduation rates, and crime rates will be examined to see if socio-demographic variations predict the absence or existence of evidence-based practice in juvenile diversion programming in the state of Ohio. The ultimate purpose is to determine whether scientifically authenticated program design is being used for juvenile diversion programs serving first-time offenders in Ohio counties.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Exploring the Theory and Paradigm Base for Wraparound
Author: Malysiak, R.
Until recently, family-centered policy and practice used expert models which defined families of children with serious emotional disturbance as dysfunctional A collaborative model, called wraparound, is emerging which engages these families as decision making participants, using naturally occurring strengths to wrap individualized supports around the child and family. However, because wraparound has been defined only through value-based principles, the fidelity of the model is threatened by a developmental paradox. Those who have received training and whose careers have been shaped in more traditional expert models of deficit remediation can interpret these value-based principles as an emergent form of case management methodology. Critical and constructivist paradigms, and ecological systems theory, form a basis for negotiating this paradox to maintain fidelity of wraparound process. Anchored in this base, and derived from wraparound's value-based principles, a single construct with an operative focus is suggested to ensure the integrity of this collaborative model.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Families' Experiences in Wraparound: A Qualitative Study Conceived and Conducted by Families Through a Professional-Family Collaboration
Author: Painter, K., Allen, J. S., & Perry, B.
The purpose of this study, the Family Experience Study, was to record experiences of families not captured by standard quantitative measures utilizing open-ended questions that allowed families to tell their stories in their own words. This qualitative study was conceived and carried out by family members who received wraparound services and participated in a Community Evaluation Team with the guidance and support of professional evaluators. Trained family members conducted structured interviews with 40 caregivers of children who completed wraparound through a collaborative community initiative aimed at creating a sustainable system of care for families with children affected by serious emotional disturbance. Interviews were recorded on audiotape, transcribed, and subjected to qualitative analysis. Key factors important to families emerged from these interviews that parallel and support the underlying principles of system of care such as collaborative, strengths based, youth and family driven, community based, individualized, and culturally competent.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Family Action Plan
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Beth Larson-Steckler
sample complete plan of care
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, implement, indicators, progress, track, goal

Family Advisory Council Meeting Flyer from Wraparound Oregon (Spanish)
Author: Wraparound Oregon
Keywords: language, interpretation, Spanish, translation, translate

Family and Youth Peer Support Literature Review
Author: Center for Health Care Strategies
This review summarizes much of the existing research on FYPS, focusing predominantly on the literature relevant to peer support for children and youth with significant mental health and/or physical health challenges.
Keywords: family partner, parent partner, role, training, coaching, research, review

Family Concerns, Strengths, and Potential Team Members
Author: Family Partnership Institute Submitted By: Brad Norman
blank form for use in identifying concerns, strengths, and team members
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, strength, safety, culture, youth

Family Development Matrix
Author: Solano Family Resource CN Submitted By: Jerry Endres
checklist for eliciting strengths in various life areas
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, crisis, stability, outcome, goal, stabilize

Family Driven, Individualized, and Outcomes Based: Improving Wraparound Teamwork and Outcomes Using the Managing and Adapting Practice (MAP) System
Author: Eric Bruns, Janet Walker, Bruce Chorpita, and Eric Daleiden
The wraparound team process has established itself as a standard of care for children and youth with complex needs and their families who require coordination of care and for whom a single intervention is unlikely to suffice. Research results indicate that wraparound's strongest evidence for positive effects are in the residential, family, and cost domains. In these areas, significant, medium-sized effects have been found across a range of studies. Positive clinical and youth functioning outcomes, on the other hand, have been less consistently found, and when they are found, they tend to be small. This has inspired many wraparound and system of care advocates to ask how better clinical and functional progress in youths might be promoted through thoughtful application of evidence-based practices within wraparound. Unfortunately, however, the traditional evidence-based practices, when implemented in "real world" community settings, are often limited in terms of their effectiveness, feasibility, and cost/benefit ratio. This article describes an alternative method for using clinical evidence to structure an individualized approach to clinical care that aligns with the wraparound philosophy. Instead of strict implementation of one or more manualized treatments, this method is based on a flexible application of the evidence for "what works" in child and family treatments. Components of this approach include the Managing and Adapting Practice (MAP) system, PracticeWise Evidence Based Services (PWEBS) Database, codified clinical supports called Practitioner Guides, and a feedback tool to monitor process and progress of treatment called the Clinical Dashboard. All these tools are supported by an on-line resource library and user interface called PracticeWise.
Keywords:

Family Driven, Individualized, and Outcomes Based: Improving Wraparound Teamwork and Outcomes Using the Managing and Adapting Practice (MAP) System
Author: Eric Bruns, Janet Walker, Bruce Chorpita, and Eric Daleiden
The wraparound team process has established itself as a standard of care for children and youth with complex needs and their families who require coordination of care and for whom a single intervention is unlikely to suffice. Research results indicate that wraparound's strongest evidence for positive effects are in the residential, family, and cost domains. In these areas, significant, medium-sized effects have been found across a range of studies. Positive clinical and youth functioning outcomes, on the other hand, have been less consistently found, and when they are found, they tend to be small. This has inspired many wraparound and system of care advocates to ask how better clinical and functional progress in youths might be promoted through thoughtful application of evidence-based practices within wraparound. Unfortunately, however, the traditional evidence-based practices, when implemented in "real world" community settings, are often limited in terms of their effectiveness, feasibility, and cost/benefit ratio. This article describes an alternative method for using clinical evidence to structure an individualized approach to clinical care that aligns with the wraparound philosophy. Instead of strict implementation of one or more manualized treatments, this method is based on a flexible application of the evidence for "what works" in child and family treatments. Components of this approach include the Managing and Adapting Practice (MAP) system, PracticeWise Evidence Based Services (PWEBS) Database, codified clinical supports called Practitioner Guides, and a feedback tool to monitor process and progress of treatment called the Clinical Dashboard. All these tools are supported by an on-line resource library and user interface called PracticeWise.
Keywords: Formal Supports, Crisis Response, Service Array, Access

Family Friendly Poster from Wraparound Oregon (Spanish)
Author: Wraparound Oregon
Wraparound Oregon: Early Childhood Hope for the future
Keywords: language, interpretation, Spanish, translation, translate

Family Functioning Style Questionnaire
Author: A. Deal, C.Trivette, & C.Dunst
set of items to elicit family strengths, beliefs, and values
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, crisis, safety, culture

Family Guide to Wraparound: The Short Version
Author: Mary Grealish Submitted By: Mary Grealish
Overview of Wraparound
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, orient, orientation, family, youth

Family Needs Scale
Author: Equipo Submitted By: Kathy Lazear
Tool for identifying needs
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, priority, culture, prioritize, outcome, goal

Family Partners and the Wraparound Process
Author: Patricia Miles
information about what family partners do as part of the wraparound team
Keywords: human resource, role, family partner

Family Partners in Wraparound: Who are they and what do they do?
Author: Marlene Penn, Trina Osher & Tracy Little
information about what family partners do as part of the wraparound team
Keywords: human resource, role, family partner

Family Partners in Wraparound: Who are they and what do they do? Poll
Author: [poll from webinar by Marlene Penn, Trina Osher & Tracy Little]
poll about family partners
Keywords: human resource, role, family partner

Family Partners Task Force: Family Partner Caseloads
Author: National Wraparound Initiative
survey of family ratios
Keywords: human resource, role, family partner

Family Stories About Family Partners in Wraparound
Author: Marlene Penn
Marlene Penn shares three stories of families who benefited from having a family partner involved in their wraparound process.
Keywords: human resource, training, coaching, coach, supervision, supervise, family partner

FAMILY VOICE WITH INFORMED CHOICE: COORDINATING WRAPAROUND WITH RESEARCH-BASED TREATMENT FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS
Author: Bruns, E. J., Walker, J. S., Bernstein, A., Daleiden, E., Pullmann, M. D., & Chorpita, B. F.
The wraparound process is a type of individualized, team-based care coordination that has become central to many state and system efforts to reform children’s mental health service delivery for youths with the most complex needs and their families. Although the emerging wraparound research base is generally positive regarding placements and costs, effect sizes are smaller for clinical and functional outcomes. This article presents a review of literature on care coordination and wraparound models, with a focus on theory and research that indicates the need to better connect wraparound-enrolled children and adolescents to evidence-based treatment (EBT). The article goes on to describe how recently developed applications of EBT that are based on quality improvement and flexible application of “common elements” of research-based care may provide a more individualized approach that better aligns with the philosophy and procedures of the wraparound process. Finally, this article presents preliminary studies that show the feasibility and potential effectiveness of coordinating wraparound with the Managing and Adapting Practice system, and discusses intervention development and research options that are currently under way.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Family Voices Network of Erie County: One Community's Story of Implementing System Reform
Author: Joan B. Kernan, Brian Pagkos, & John Grieco
This chapter describes our community’s journey toward implementation of wraparound and system of care, and the role that the use of data has played in that journey
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development

Family's Vision
Author: Family Partnership Institute Submitted By: Brad Norman
process for developing a team vision or mission
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, mission

Financing Care Management in Maryland
Author: Gerry Grimm
report on the funding of CMEs in Maryland
Keywords: finance, sustainability, state, model

Financing Options for Care Management Entities: The Massachusetts Experience
Author: Suzanne Fields
overview of funding options for CREs in Massachusetts.
Keywords: finance, sustainability, state, model

Finding Actions to Meet Needs
Author: Wraparound Milwaukee Submitted By: Mary Jo Meyers
process to develop creative strategies
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan

Flexible Funding and Resource Allocation
Author: Family Partnership Institute Submitted By: Brad Norman
tips and examples for funding strategies for which money is not readily available
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, implement, indicators, progress, track

Focusing on Strengths
Author: North Carolina SOC
framework for eliciting strengths AND sample strengths
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, crisis, safety, culture

Fostering Solutions: Bringing Brief-Therapy Principles and Practices to the Child Welfare System
Author: Flemons, D., Liscio, M., Gordon, A. B., Hibel, J., Gutierrez-Hersh, A., & Rebholz, C. L.
This article describes a 15-month university-community collaboration that was designed to fast-track children out of foster care. The developers of the project initiated resource-oriented "systems facilitations," allowing wraparound professionals and families to come together in large meetings to solve problems and find solutions. Families also participated in strength-based brief-therapy sessions. The authors describe the history, structure, and process of the project, and they provide a case study to illustrate the approach and exemplify the kinds of changes that occurred throughout the system. In the final section of the article, the authors reflect on what they learned about their university-community partnership, what they would do differently the next time, and the implications of such larger-system involvements for American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy's Core Competencies.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

From Family Support to Family Friendly to Collaborating with Families: Metaphors, Change, and Service Provision
Author: David Osher
A compilation of resources collected by the Family Partner Task Force, focused on strengths-based communication.
Keywords: principle, theory

Functional assessment and wraparound as systemic school processes: Primary, secondary, and tertiary systems examples
Author: Scott, T. M., & Eber, L.
This article proposes a framework for expanding the traditional presentation of wraparound and FBA to (a) view wraparound and FBA as concepts that are inextricably linked at the core of each level of the proactive systemic process of PBS and (b) understand how wraparound and FBA are critical features of prevention as well as intervention for creating safer schools for all students.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Functional Behavioral Analysis and Wraparound
Author: Jim Rast & Susan Boehrer
Functional Assessment and Preparing Families for Life After Formal Wraparound
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, strength, need, culture

Functional Behavioral Analysis and Wraparound: Poll
Author: [poll from webinar by Jim Rast & Susan Boehrer]
Functional Assessment and Preparing Families for Life After Formal Wraparound Poll
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, strength, need, culture

Funding Wraparound is Much More than Money
Author: Constance Conklin
overview of funding options for wraparound
Keywords: finance, sustainability, local, model

Getting to Know Each Other
Author: Family Partnership Institute Submitted By: Brad Norman
activity to build team cohesiveness
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, implement, indicators, team, buy-in, track

Grounded theory and backward mapping: Exploring the implementation context for wraparound
Author: Walker, J. S., & Koroloff, N.
Within children's mental health, there is an increasing demand for wider implementation of wraparound and other interventions that can provide comprehensive, individualized, family-driven care. Unfortunately, implementation has proven difficult because these approaches do not necessarily flourish within traditionally organized agencies and systems. This has highlighted the need for information about how mental health agencies and systems must evolve if they are to provide a hospitable implementation environment for these interventions. A first step in developing this information is through research that advances conceptual and theoretical understanding of the impact of contextual factors on implementation. At the same time, there is an immediate need for practical information to guide decision making and policy development in settings where implementation is being undertaken. This article describes a study of wraparound implementation that used a combination of qualitative strategies to meet both of these needs simultaneously. It is argued that these strategies are particularly well suited to the study of emerging practices that reflect-and help drive-transformation in mental health systems.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Groundworks Homeless Youth Wraparound Program Results Summary
Author: United Way of King County Submitted By: Erin Maguire
This evaluation reports that wraparound with homeless youth has positive impacts on living situation
Keywords: research, evaluation, program, report

Health Care Reform and Children: Planning and Design Considerations for Policymakers
Author: Jennifer Dolatshahi, Catherine Hess, & Joanne Jee
This report from the National Academy for State Health Policy explains some of the major challenges for children's coverage under the Affordable Care Act, and describes policy options for making health care reform work for children. The potential solutions draw upon lessons learned from state Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs (CHIP), federal policy, and relevant research.
Keywords: state, model, finance, service, support, array, access, eligibility, intake

Hiring Family Members as Wraparound Facilitators
Author: [various]
Keywords: human resource, role, facilitator, care coordinator

History of the Wraparound Process
Author: John VanDenBerg, Eric Bruns, & John Burchard
a history of the wraparound process
Keywords: history

Home-based services for high-risk youth: Assessment, wraparound planning, and service delivery
Author: Cornett, S. M.
This important new book shows how: How to make the family a full partner in your work with children and use the power and strength of the family to achieve healthy outcomes; How to assess the emotional needs of youth throughout each key developmental stage of childhood and adolescence, tailor home- and community-based services, and fine-tune service planning for each client; How to hire, train, motivate, and reward staff while reducing turnover and burnout. Plus, you'll get sample checklists, forms, and worksheets for hiring and staff development, client assessment, and individual service plan development.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Home-based treatment for children and families affected by HIV and AIDS. Dealing with stigma, secrecy, disclosure, and loss
Author: Gewirtz, A., & Gossart-Walker, S.
The compelling needs of HIV-affected children and families sometimes appear to represent human struggles under the magnifying glass. The multiple assaults on the healthy psychologic development of children through disruptions in caregiving, loss, and abandonment require interventions that are mindful of their mental health needs and longer-term developmental trajectories. An ongoing relationship with a clinical team who can understand and respond to the vicissitudes of the illness and provide calibrated psychotherapeutic and case management services can aid both children and parents in the painful tasks that AIDS presents. Whereas clinically informed case management services can offer respectful and thoughtful concrete help, psychotherapy can offer the opportunity for children to pull together the often fragmented narratives of their family lives and integrate object loss to be free to continue on a normative developmental path. Comprehensive, wraparound home-based services of the type described in this article represent a mostly new tradition in psychiatry, but one that ensures that mental health services are provided to the most vulnerable children and families. For those affected by HIV or AIDS, home-based services can be the key to healthcare and treatment compliance. In addition, when services are well integrated within a community context, such that regular communication with other healthcare providers (AIDS clinics, visiting nurse services, and AIDS care agencies) is ongoing, what is provided constitutes continuity of care in the truest sense.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Hope for the Children: A Community-Based Approach to Supporting Families Who Adopt Children with Special Needs
Author: Kramer, L., & Houston, D.
This study explored the need for and use of support by preadoptive families of children with special needs in the Hope for the Children program. The families live in a community alongside other foster and adoptive parents, senior citizen volunteers, tutors, therapists, mentors, and family advocates, and receive extensive community supports. Descriptive results from the study provide a basis for recommendations about the use of coordinated service delivery systems to promote adoption success.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

How Family Partners Contribute to the Phases and Activities of the Wraparound Process [standalone version]
Author: Trina Osher & Marlene Penn
overview of the ways family partners contribute to the wraparound process
Keywords: human resource, role, family partner, practice model

How School Sector Coordinators and Family Resource Developers Support the Wraparound Process
Author: Beth Berndt
a loot at the ways coordinators and developers support wraparound
Keywords: setting, school, youth partner

How Wraparound Can Help Overcome Three Common Barriers to Successful Transition Services
Author: Burchard, J. D.
Based on his experiences as the leader of Vermont's Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services and a transition researcher, the author describes why transitions from institutional settings to less restrictive ones are often unsuccessful. Also offers suggestions, including wraparound, for reversing this problem.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

How, and Why, Does Wraparond Work: A Theory of Change
Author: Janet Walker Submitted By: Janet Walker
Using the foundation supplied by the specification of the principles (Bruns et al., 2004) and practice model (Walker et al., 2004) of wraparound, the National Wraparound Initiative (NWI) has proposed a more detailed theory of change to describe how and why wraparound works.
Keywords: principle, theory, logic model

How, and Why, Does Wraparound Work: A Theory of Change [standalone version]
Author: Janet Walker
Using the foundation supplied by the specification of the principles and practice model of wraparound, the National Wraparound Initiative (NWI) has proposed a more detailed theory of change to describe how and why wraparound works
Keywords: principle, theory, logic model

Identifying Family Strengths and Preferences
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Pat Miles
blank form for strengths discovery with tips/techniques and example
Keywords: tool, strength, planning, plan, need, culture

Identifying Needs
Author: Wraparound Milwaukee Submitted By: Mary Jo Meyers
tips/techniques for identifying needs
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, priority, prioritize, need, outcome, goal

Impact of Team Structure on Achieving Treatment Goals in a System of Care
Author: Wright, E. R., Russell, L. A., Anderson, J. A., Kooreman, H. E., & Wright, D. E.
Although some evidence suggests that providing treatment via service coordination teams is related to improved outcomes among youth in a system of care, the aspects of team structure that contribute to treatment effectiveness are not well understood. This study draws on team membership and attendance data to identify and describe the structure of service coordination teams in the Dawn Project, a system-of-care initiative in Indianapolis, Indiana. This analysis examines three dimensions of team structure--size, form, and role composition--as well as the effect of these dimensions on the young people's program disposition. The results suggest that service coordination teams are most likely to be effective in achieving the team's treatment goals when they consist of four to eight members and include the youth and multiple family members. More generally, the findings underline the importance of considering team structure as an important force in shaping the effectiveness of service coordination programs and the potential utility of social network methods for studying these effects. The implications for management of service coordination teams and for future research on service coordination teams are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Impact of Training and Technical Assistance (IOTTA) for Wraparound
Author: Janet Walker & Eric Bruns
This brief reports on an assessment approach that is being developed and tested by the National Wraparound Initiative called the Impact of Training and Technical Assistance (IOTTA) for Wraparound. IOTTA assesses stakeholder perceptions of immediate and longer-term benefits in areas that research has linked to effective implementation and practice change.
Keywords: human resource, training, coaching, coach, supervision, supervise

Implementation Research and Wraparound Literature: Building a Research Agenda
Author: Rosalyn Bertram, Jesse Suter, Eric Bruns, & Koren O’Rourke
The authors used the framework identified by the National Implementation Research Network’s (NIRN) analysis of 35 years of implementation outcomes literature from diverse fields of endeavor to review the current state of wraparound implementation research. Model definition, model fidelity and intervention outcomes were areas of relatively greater development, while target population, theory base and theory of change, organizational context and readiness, staff selection, training, supervision or coaching, purveyor selection, and program installation were less examined or even overlooked. They conclude with suggestions for building a research agenda on wraparound implementation.
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development

Implementation research and wraparound literature: Building a research agenda
Author: Bertram, R. M., Suter, J. C., Bruns, E. J., & O’Rourke, K. E.
We used the framework identified by the National Implementation Research Network’s (NIRN) analysis of 35 years of implementation outcomes literature from diverse fields of endeavor to review the current state of wraparound implementation research. Model definition, model fidelity and intervention outcomes were areas of relatively greater development, while target population, theory base and theory of change, organizational context and readiness, staff selection, training, supervision or coaching, purveyor selection, and program installation were less examined or even overlooked. We conclude with suggestions for building a research agenda on wraparound implementation.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

IMPLEMENTATION RESEARCH AND WRAPAROUND LITERATURE: BUILDING A RESEARCH AGENDA
Author: Rosalyn M. Bertram, Jesse C. Suter, Eric J. Bruns, & Koren E. O’Rourke.
We used the framework identified by the National Implementation Research Network’s (NIRN) analysis of 35 years of implementation outcomes literature from diverse fields of endeavor to review the current state of wraparound implementation research. Model definition, model fidelity and intervention outcomes were areas of relatively greater development, while target population, theory base and theory of change, organizational context and readiness, staff selection, training, supervision or coaching, purveyor selection, and program installation were less examined or even overlooked. We conclude with suggestions for building a research agenda on wraparound implementation.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Implementing Culture-Based Wraparound
Author: Scott Palmer, Tang Judy Vang, Gary Bess, Harold Baize, Kurt Moore, Alva De La Torre, Simone Simpson, Kim Holbrook, Daedalys Wils
This article describes how to implement cultural components and offers preliminary comparative findings based on the experience of Connecting Circles of Care (CCOC), a SAMHSA-funded systems of care grantee.
Keywords: principle, theory, cultural competence

Implementing High-Quality Collaborative Individualized Service/Support Planning: Necessary Conditions
Author: Janet S. Walker, Nancy Koroloff, & Kathryn Schutte
examination of the prerequisite conditions for implementing service/support planning
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development

Implementing the Peer Support Specialist Role: Providing Direct, Individualized Support in a Local Program
Author: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures
This brief examines how one locally-initiated program has implemented the Peer Support Specialist role for youth and young adults with serious mental health conditions.
Keywords: youth partner, role, training, coaching

Implementing the Peer Support Specialist Role: Youth Peer Support in Wraparound
Author: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures
This brief examines how Pennsylvania has implemented and supported the Peer Support Specialist role at the state level.
Keywords: youth partner, role, training, coaching

Improving School-Based Behavioral Interventions through Use of the Wraparound Process
Author: Eber, L.
Describes the "wraparound" process--a method for developing realistic behavior plans for children with emotional and behavioral disabilities, involving significant persons from all domains of the child's life. Explores how this process can be used by educators in education plans and in other school-based planning meetings.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

In quest of an interdisciplinary helping process framework for collaborative practice in systems of care
Author: Powell, J. Y., Privette, A., Miller, S. D., & Whittaker, J. K.
The “‘Heart and Soul of Change’: Therapies for a New Century” interdisciplinary symposium developed from a personal dream. The dream grew out of a collaborative, community-wide “system of care” project which helped children with serious emotional disturbances and their families receive comprehensive services. To support the community's system of care project, East Carolina University assembled a team of faculty from a cross-section of professional “helping” disciplines. A core faculty group accepted the responsibility of developing a curriculum and teaching an interdisciplinary, collaborative practice course. They soon realized that professional literature lacked conceptual frameworks that could guide professionals from various disciplines who practice in “systems of care” or use “wraparound” techniques. In such settings, professionals are expected to collaborate together and be “partners with families.” As a result, they decided to bring together Dr. Scott D. Miller and Dr. James K. Whittaker to lead a symposium to help build a unifying framework for collaborative, interdisciplinary practice. Using a personal format, this essay tells how the symposium developed, and it gives a brief overview of its presentations. Finally it concludes with several post-symposium questions addressed to Dr. Miller and Dr. Whittaker that help further develop a framework for interdisciplinary, collaborative practice. This information will be of use to serve providers as they attempt to develop a framework for their work. Further, it is expected that the questions addressed in this essay are questions that all service providers need to consider as they work collaboratively with children and families.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

In-home family therapy and wraparound services for working with seriously at-risk children and adolescents
Author: Slattery, J. M., & Knapp, S.
(From the introduction) Addresses community wraparound services for children. Traditional approaches to treatment usually assume that mental health problems are individual in nature and stable in duration, with hospital care, if used at all, designed to stabilize the problem quickly with quick referral to another provider. This traditional approach does not always work well with children. Children's problems often are embedded in home and school conflicts, and children have limited power to advocate for change. Consequently, services to children sometimes require home-based wraparound services. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved) (introduction)
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Individualized services and supports through the wraparound process: Philosophy and procedures
Author: VanDenBerg, J. E., & Grealish, E. M.
The wraparound process is emerging as an alternative to the traditional treatment planning processes inherent in categorical services for children and adolescents with emotional and behavioral disorders. We describe the current practices which have been developed in the field. Key elements of the value and philosophical base for the wraparound process are discussed. Proposed procedural steps are described to aid communities in the implementation of the wraparound process. Due to social and policy pressures, it is likely that wraparound process implementations will continue to develop.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Individualized services for children
Author: VanDenBerg, J. E.
(From the editor's comments) Delineates the successful, cost-effective "wrap-around" services program that benefited children and youth with NBD [neurobiological disorders] in the Alaska Youth Initiative (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved) (editor's comments)
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Individualized services in systems of care: The wraparound process
Author: Walker, J. S., Bruns, E. J., & Penn, M.
(From the chapter) This chapter discusses a system of care delivery service described as "wraparound". Wraparound is the term used to describe a team-based, collaborative process for developing and implementing individualized care plans for children with complex needs and their families. Since the 1980's, the wraparound process has grown to become one of the most popular strategies for realizing the system of care philosophy while providing care to individual children, youth, and families with high levels of need. Wraparound has been described as an "evidence-based process . . . that cuts across a number of clinical interventions". This process requires that family members, providers, and key members of the family's social support network collaborate to build a creative plan that responds to the particular needs of the child and family. The wraparound plan includes and coordinates the entire array of services and supports that the family receives within the system of care. Team members then implement the plan and continue to meet regularly to monitor progress and make adjustments to the plan as necessary. The team continues its work until members reach the consensus that a formal wraparound process is no longer needed. The wraparound process stands in sharp contrast to traditional forms of service delivery, which have often been experienced by youth and families as professional driven, family blaming, deficit based, and lacking in respect for the family's needs, beliefs, and values. Consider the true story of one youth, "Devon," and his mother, "Elizabeth," which is discussed at several points throughout this chapter (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved) (chapter)
Keywords: research, study, abtract
Individualized wrap-around services for children with emotional, behavior, and mental disorders
Author: Karp, N.
Describes the evolution and components of wrap-around services, discusses research and social policy implications related to wrap-around services, and makes recommendations for future research (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved) (chapter)
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Individualizing Care for Children with Complex Needs Through Developing a Comprehensive Service Array and Provider Network
Author: Bruce Kamradt [Presenter]
ways to individualize wraparound processes
Keywords: collaborative, collaboration

Informal Resources and Supports Used in Wraparound Plans
Author: Indiana Behavioral Health Choice Submitted By: Janet McIntyre
examples of creative plan strategies using informal/natural supports
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, implement, indicators

Initial Plan Development-- Wraparound Plan of Care
Author: Family Partnership Institute Submitted By: Brad Norman
blank plan of care template
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, document, documentation, need, outcome, goal

Integrating the components into an effective system of care: A framework for putting the pieces together
Author: Hodges, S., Friedman, R. M., & Hernandez, M.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Integrating Wraparound into a Schoolwide System of Positive Behavior Supports
Author: Lucille Eber, Kelly Hyde, & Jesse Suter
We describe the structure for implementation of the wraparound process within a multi-tiered system of school wide positive behavior support (SWPBS) to address the needs of the 1–5% of students with complex emotional/behavioral challenges.
Keywords: setting, school, study

INTEGRATING WRAPAROUND INTO A SCHOOLWIDE SYSTEM OF POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORTS
Author: Lucille Eber, Kelly Hyde, & Jesse C. Suter.
We describe the structure for implementation of the wraparound process within a multi-tiered system of school wide positive behavior support (SWPBS) to address the needs of the 1–5% of students with complex emotional/ behavioral challenges. The installation of prerequisite system features that, based on a 3 year demonstration process, we consider critical to full operation of the Tier 3 wraparound intervention within a system of SWPBS is also described. We include examples of system implementation benchmarks that occur concurrently with student outcome data and are logically linked to full operation and sustainability of wraparound implementation. Challenges surrounding implementation and proposed advancements are also discussed.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Integrating Wraparound into Schools
Author: Lucille Eber & Sara Teeter
webinar about putting outcomes for students students with complex with complex emotional/behavioral needs into the context of schools asas systems to educate and systems to educate and support ALL students
Keywords: setting, school

Integration of Individualized Mental-Health Services into the System of Care for Children and Adolescents
Author: Vandenberg, J. E.
Many states have developed “systems of care” which are organized networks of service alternatives for children with emotional disabilities. However, in some states, these systems did not have a positive effect on the most disabled of youth and their families. A viable option is “wrap-around” or “individualized” services which, when integrated into system of care services, can be more effective and less expensive.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Intensive Care Coordination Using High-Quality Wraparound for Children with Serious Behavioral Health Needs: State and Community Profiles
Author: Simons, D., Pires, S. A., Hendricks, T., & Lipper, J. (The Center for Health Care Strategies, Inc.)
The Center for Health Care Strategies (www.chcs.org) has collected profiles of established, evolving and emerging intensive care coordination programs across the United States. This resource documents key features of each program including its overall structure, eligibility and screening criteria, requirements for care coordinators, the role of psychiatry, parent/caregiver peer supports, financing, training and evaluation.
Keywords: community, guide, profile

Intermediaries Promote the Use of Research Evidence in Children's Behavioral Health Systems Change
Author: Kathleen Biebel, Susan Maciolek, Joanne Nicholson, Gifty Debordes-Jackson, & Laurel Leslie
This issue brief from the UMass Center for Mental Health Services Research summarizes findings from a study of statewide implementation of Wraparound in Massachusetts in response to the Rosie D. v Romney lawsuit. The study examined how research was used, particularly by "intermediaries" (consultants) who advised practitioners on how to adhere to wraparound best practices, and who assisted state policymakers in translating the court's directives into state Medicaid managed care program standards.
Keywords: system, development

Intervening effectively in the lives of youth with complex behavioral health challenges and their families: The role of the wrap
Author: Eric Bruns, Janet Walker, Michelle Zabel, Marlene Matarese, Kimberly Estep, Deborah Harburger, Madge Mosby, Sheila Pires
This paper provides a review of the place of the wraparound process in behavioral health, including a discussion of the opportunities it presents to the field, needs for further development and research, and recommendations for federal actions that have the potential to improve the model's positive contribution to child and family well-being.
Keywords: research, review

Intervening Effectively in the Lives of Youth with Complex Behavioral Health Challenges and Their Families: The Role of the Wrap
Author: Eric Bruns, Janet Walker, Michelle Zabel, Marlene Matarese, Kimberly Estep, Deborah Harburger, Madge Mosby, & Sheila Pires
This NWI article was been published in the American Journal of Community Psychology.
Keywords:

Intervening in the lives of youth with complex behavioral health challenges and their families: The role of the wraparound process
Author: Bruns EJ1, Walker JS, Zabel M, Matarese M, Estep K, Harburger D, Mosby M, Pires SA.
Wraparound is an individualized, team-based service planning and care coordination process intended to improve outcomes for youth with complex behavioral health challenges and their families. In recent years, several factors have led wraparound to become an increasingly visible component of service systems for youth, including its alignment with the youth and family movements, clear role within the systems of care and public health frameworks, and expansion of the research base. In this paper, we provide a review of the place of the wraparound process in behavioral health, including a discussion of the opportunities it presents to the field, needs for further development and research, and recommendations for federal actions that have the potential to improve the model's positive contribution to child and family well-being.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Involving Youth in Planning for Their Education, Treatment and Services: Research Tells Us We Should Be Doing Better
Author: Janet S. Walker & Beckie Child
Keywords: youth, theory, youth partner, coach, supervision, supervise

Is implementation fidelity associated with improved access to care in a School-based Child and Family Team model?
Author: Gifford, E., Wells, R., Bai, Y. & Malone, P.
Effective child and family centered service planning is crucial to addressing vulnerable children's needs. However, there is limited evidence about what facets of these processes improve service use and outcomes. The current study used a Poisson random effects hazard model to test correlations between fidelity to NC's Child and Family Support Team model and time to service receipt, using case management data for 3396 children served by that program during the 2008–2009 school year. Students were more likely to receive recommended services more quickly when caregivers and the students attended planning meetings, when their plans included services for caregivers, and when child and family team leaders followed up after meetings to verify service receipt. Contrary to the Child and Family Support Team theory of change, match between student needs and the lead agency of the meeting was not associated with the odds of quicker service receipt, nor was attendance by natural supports. Findings from this study demonstrate the potential effectiveness of using case management systems to measure service planning process fidelity, as well as how results thereof can both inform process improvement and potential refinements to models’ theories of change.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Is it wraparound yet? Setting quality standards for implementation of the wraparound process
Author: Bruns EJ, Suter JC, Leverentz-Brady K.
The wraparound process has increasingly been used as a mechanism to plan and coordinate services for children with behavioral health needs and their families. This has led to growing interest in assessing wraparound implementation against standards for quality. However, there has been little consideration of how best to establish such benchmarks or guidelines. Using both a norm-referenced and criterion-referenced approach, this study established preliminary criteria for assessing the adequacy of wraparound implementation using the Wraparound Fidelity Index, version 3, a multi-informant interview that assesses conformance to wraparound principles. The evaluation system was then applied to ten wraparound programs and 11 different study samples assessed via the Wraparound Fidelity Index version 3 in research studies. The system was constructed to discriminate different wraparound conditions assessed in research studies while still being attainable by the ten established wraparound programs. Implications for evaluating wraparound programs and for setting fidelity benchmarks in behavioral health services research are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Johnny Chaos and the Wraparound Brigade: Issue 01
Author: Craig Delano
Keywords:

Johnny Chaos and the Wraparound Brigade: Issue 02
Author: Craig Delano
Keywords:

Johnny Chaos and the Wraparound Brigade: Issue 03
Author: Craig Delano
Keywords:

Johnny Chaos and the Wraparound Brigade: Issue 04
Author: Craig Delano
Keywords:

Johnny Chaos and the Wraparound Brigade: Issue 05
Author: Craig Delano
Keywords:

Johnny Chaos and the Wraparound Brigade: Issue 06
Author: Craig Delano
Keywords:

Johnny Chaos and the Wraparound Brigade: Issue 07
Author: Craig Delano
Keywords:

Johnny Chaos and the Wraparound Brigade: Issue 08
Author: Craig Delano
Keywords:

Johnny Chaos and the Wraparound Brigade: Issue 09
Author: Craig Delano
Keywords:

Johnny Chaos and the Wraparound Brigade: Issue 10
Author: Craig Delano
Keywords:

Juvenile justice mental health services
Author: Thomas, C. R., & Penn, J. V.
As the second century of partnership begins, child psychiatry and juvenile justice face continuing challenges in meeting the mental health needs of delinquents. The modern juvenile justice system is marked by a significantly higher volume of cases, with increasingly complicated multiproblem youths and families with comorbid medical, psychiatric, substance abuse disorders, multiple family and psychosocial adversities, and shrinking community resources and alternatives to confinement. The family court is faced with shrinking financial resources to support court-ordered placement and treatment programs in efforts to treat and rehabilitate youths. The recognition of high rates of mental disorders for incarcerated youth has prompted several recommendations for improvement and calls for reform [56,57]. In their 2000 annual report, the Coalition for Juvenile Justice advocated increased access to mental health services that provide a continuum of care tailored to the specific problems of incarcerated youth [58]. The specific recommendations of the report for mental health providers include the need for wraparound services, improved planning and coordination between agencies, and further research. The Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has set three priorities in dealing with the mental health needs of delinquents: further research on the prevalence of mental illness among juvenile offenders, development of mental health screening assessment protocols, and improved mental health services [59]. Other programs have called for earlier detection and diversion of troubled youth from juvenile justice to mental health systems [31,56]. Most recently, many juvenile and family courts have developed innovative programs to address specific problems such as truancy or substance use and diversionary or alternative sentencing programs to deal with first-time or nonviolent delinquents. All youths who come in contact with the juvenile justice system should be screened and, when necessary, assessed for mental health and substance abuse disorders. The screening should occur at the youth's earliest point of contact with the juvenile justice system and should be available at all stages of juvenile justice processing. Whenever possible, youth with serious mental health disorders should be diverted from the juvenile justice system [58]. If delinquent youths do not receive the necessary evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation, they face the real prospect of further incarceration in adult correctional facilities. Improved screening and treatment require better interagency collaboration, established standards of care, and continuing research on the mental health needs of youth in the juvenile justice system. Better mental health care for youth in the juvenile justice system supports the goal of rehabilitation. Mental health professionals should support these efforts as the appropriate response to meet the challenges of the new century.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Juvenile offenders with mental health needs: Reducing recidivism using wraparound
Author: Pullmann, M. A., Kerbs, J., Koroloff, N., Veach-White, E., Gaylor, R., & Sieler, D. D.
The rate of youth with mental health needs is disproportionately high in juvenile justice. Wraparound planning involves families and providers in coordinating juvenile justice, mental health, and other services and supports. This study compares data from two groups of juvenile offenders with mental health problems: 106 youth in a juvenile justice wraparound program called Connections and a historical comparison group of 98 youth in traditional mental health services. Cox regression survival analyses revealed that youth in Connections were significantly less likely to recidivate at all, less likely to recidivate with a felony offense, and served less detention time.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Levine Consumer Feedback
Author: K.G. Levine, N. Pessin
Form for recording consumer feedback about a contact/session
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, implement, indicators, team, track, buy-in

Life Domain Planning Protocol
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Lucille Eber
set of topics for exploring strengths and needs using life domains
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, crisis, culture, safety, outcome, goal

Louisiana Children's Cabinet
Author: [Various]
The focus of the Louisiana Children's Cabinet is to synchronize children's policy across the five state departments providing services for young people: Children and Family Services, Departments of Education, Health and Hospitals, Office of Juvenile Justice and the Louisiana Workforce Commission.
Keywords: Vision, Mission, Strategic Plan, MOU, Share, Legislation, Policy

Maine Governor's Children's Cabinet
Author: [not available]
This document outlines the departments, agencies, and functions of the Maine Children's Cabinet.
Keywords: vision, mission, strategy, plan, MOU, information, share, legislation, law, policy, laws, policies

Manual de Usuario del Proceso del Wraparound (Asistencia Integral): Una Guía para Familias (Spanish Version of The Wraparound P
Author: Pat Miles, Eric Bruns, Trina Osher, Janet Walker, & National Wraparound Initiative Advisory Group
La Guía del Usuario fue creada para que funcionara como "hoja de ruta" para los miembros de la familia. Dentro de la Guía, primero verá algunos de los resúmenes básicos del proceso del wraparound, una lista de términos comunes sobre el wraparound, detalles sobre el proceso del wraparound y notas sobre cómo solucionar problemas comunes que ocurren.
Keywords: language, interpretation, family, youth, translate, Spanish, translation, orientation

Marketing Wraparound: Information Sheet
Author: Helen Mitternight
This information sheet, originally published in the TA Telescope (January, 2015), describes social marketing strategies for sharing your Wraparound success story.
Keywords: social, marketing

Massachusetts: Statewide Medicaid-Driven System, Resulting from the Settlement of a Lawsuit
Author: Bruce Kamradt
brief on financing options
Keywords: finance, sustainability, state, model

Massachusetts: Targeted Case Management-Intensive Care Coordination Service Definition
Author: Commonwealth of Massachusettes, Executive Office of Health and Human Services Submitted By: John Ossowski
This publication defines Intensive Care Coordination in Targeted Case Management Services. It addresses the development and role of a Care Planning Team in services to youth with SED and their families.
Keywords: implementation, standards

Measuring Wraparound Fidelity
Author: Eric Bruns
an examination of the wraparound ideal vs. the reality
Keywords: accountability, data, fidelity, assessment, measure

Measuring Wraparound Fidelity to Make Quality Improvements
Author: Kernan, J. Submitted By: John Ossowski
(Full text not available through the NWI.) This article reports on the use of the Wraparound Fidelity Index (WFI) to measure wraparound fidelity in Erie County, NY. Use of the WFI highlighted areas of improvement for youth engagement and for the transition phase of wraparound.
Keywords: fidelity, assessment, measure

MEASURING WRAPAROUND FIDELITY TO MAKE QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS
Author: Kernan, J. B.
This article reports on the use of the Wraparound Fidelity Index (WFI) to measure wraparound fidelity in Erie County, NY. Use of the WFI highlighted areas of improvement for youth engagement and for the transition phase of wraparound.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Measuring wraparound in practice: How closely it adheres to wraparound principles and how it differs from traditional approaches to serving youth with severe emotional and behavioral challenges
Author: Bramley, J.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Medicaid Financing for Family and Youth Peer Support: A Scan of State Programs
Author: Center for Health Care Strategies, Inc
Family and youth peer support providers are integral to teams serving children and youth with behavioral health challenges and their families, and they are distinct from traditional mental health service providers in that they operate out of their personal experience and knowledge. Strategies for funding formal family and youth peer support exist in states across the country. This document draws from a national scan of states that are using Medicaid to finance family and youth peer support efforts.
Keywords: human resource, role, youth partner, model

Medicaid Reimbursement for Wraparound Care Coordination for Children and Youth with Complex Behavioral Health Needs
Author: Sheila Pires, Chris Koyanagi, & Eric Bruns
Along with several Congressional staff persons and representatives of the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law and Human Services Collaborative, leaders of the National Wraparound Initiative recently participated in a series of policy briefings with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) regarding care coordination in children's behavioral health services and related Medicaid reimbursement issues. As a result of these conversations, the team developed a memorandum for CMS with policy recommendations regarding Medicaid funding for intensive care coordination.
Keywords: finance, sustainability

Meltdowns and containments: Constructions of children at risk as complex systems
Author: Nybell, L.
Maintains that reform in children's services is linked to changes in conceptions of the nature of childhood and children's needs. Highlights demonstration project of "wraparound" services for early adolescents to suggest that these emerging programs may embed notions of children as complex systems, ideas that differ significantly from accounts of child development as a linear, staged, and goal-oriented progression.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Mississippi Code of 1972
Author: [Various]
This document outlines the departments, agencies, and functions of the Mississippi Children's Cabinet.
Keywords: vision, mission, strategy, plan, MOU, information, share, legislation, law, policy, laws, policies

Model approaches for children and youth with serious emotional disturbance: Systems of care and wraparound
Author: Fischer, N. R.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Moving from Principles to Practice: Recommended Policy Changes to Promote Family-Centered Care
Author: Kilmer, R. P., Cook, J. R., & Munsell, E. P.
This paper emphasizes the value of family-centered care. Discussion highlights family-centered philosophies (e.g., Systems of Care [SOCs]) and practice models (i.e., wraparound) and identifies discrepancies between conceptualizations and actual practice. Data from multiple sources detail issues in fidelity to family-centered values and needs and risks experienced by siblings of children with severe emotional disturbance and their caregivers. This discussion provides a springboard for policy recommendations to strengthen family support programming and enhance family-centered care, from modifying funding streams such that systems extend their reach beyond children with full-blown, diagnosable problems (those meeting standards of "medical necessity), to supporting prevention and early intervention initiatives that address families as targets for intervention. Recommendations include ensuring that communities with SOC funding address the needs of families; broadening Medicaid rules and definitions; expanding the range of reimbursable activities and services; and increasing funding for evaluating family-centered care models and family support programming.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

My Career Journey with Wraparound Milwaukee
Author: Kenyetta Matthews
personal account of Kenyatta Matthews’ nine-year experience with Wraparound Milwaukee
Keywords: human resource, role, facilitator, care coordinator

Narrative Work in Public Social Services Through Wraparound Planning
Author: Swartz, R.
Narrative ways of working are often associated with traditional therapy contexts, such as counseling with individuals, couples, families, and groups in an office or therapeutic facility. Recent developments in the realm of social services, however, are consistent with narrative ideas and practices. Wraparound planning, which is committed to individualized services, collaborative planning, community-based contexts, and unconditional care, is a burgeoning movement in public social services that intersects with narrative ways of working.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

National Evaluation of the Medicaid Demonstration Home- and Community-Based Alternatives to Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities: Interim Evaluation Report - October 2011
Author: Oswaldo Urdapilleta, Ying Wang, Rekha Varghese, Geena Kim, Sirisha Busam, & Carrie Palmisano
This interim report shows that across all state grantees over the first three waiver years, the Demonstration successfully enabled children and/or youth to either maintain or improve their functional status while in the waiver program. Furthermore, over the first two waiver years, Demonstration treatment costs are totaling no more on average than anticipated aggregate PRTF expenditures in the absence of the Demonstration. In most cases, waiver costs were around 20 percent of the average per capita total Medicaid costs for services in institutions, an average per capita saving of $20,000 to $40,000, excluding high and low outliers.
Keywords: research, evaluation, study, analysis, expenditure, cost, costs, finance, finances

National Evaluation of the Medicaid Demonstration Waiver Home- and Community-Based Alternatives to Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities - May 2012
Author: Oswaldo Urdapilleta, Ying Wang, Rekha Varghese, Geena Kim, Sirisha Busam, & Carrie Palmisano
This report summarizes home- and community-based service outcomes for youth in 9 states that completed a 3-year PRTF waiver demonstration program. Results show that youth in waiver states maintained or improved their functional status and that the delivered services passed a budget neutrality test. The report also shows strong evidence that home- and community-based services actually cost substantially less than institutionalization.
Keywords: cost, analysis, expenditure, expenditures, study, research, finance, costs, finances

National Trends in Implementing Wraparound: Results from the State Wraparound Survey
Author: Eric Bruns, April Sather, Michael Pullman, & Leyla Faw Stambaugh
The authors compared results of two surveys of state children's mental health directors, completed in 1998 and 2008, to derive estimates of the extent of wraparound implementation in the United States and to better understand trends in how wraparound has been implemented and supported over time.
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development

National trends in implementing wraparound: Results from the state wraparound survey
Author: Bruns, E. J., Sather, A., Pullmann, M. D., & Stambaugh, L. F.
The wraparound process has been promoted in the children’s services field as a mechanism to achieve collaborative service planning and delivery for families of young people with complex emotional and behavioral needs that span multiple agencies. We compared results of two surveys of state children’s mental health directors, completed in 1998 and 2008, to derive estimates of the extent of wraparound implementation in the United States and to better understand trends in how wraparound has been implemented and supported over time. Results from 2008 found that 88% of states reported having some type of wraparound program that conformed to the definition and provided an estimate of 100,000 children and families served via wraparound in that year. Between 1998 and 2008, states reported increased application of wraparound standards, a greater number of agencies involved in wraparound initiatives, and more formal evaluations of wraparound initiatives. Results provide substantiation of the widespread implementation of wraparound implementation in the United States, and evidence that the model is becoming more consistently supported by formal implementation structures over time.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

NATIONAL TRENDS IN IMPLEMENTING WRAPAROUND: RESULTS FROM THE STATE WRAPAROUND SURVEY
Author: Eric J. Bruns, April Sather, Michael D. Pullman, & Leyla Faw Stambaugh.
The wraparound process has been promoted in the children’s services field as a mechanism to achieve collaborative service planning and delivery for families of young people with complex emotional and behavioral needs that span multiple agencies. We compared results of two surveys of state children’s mental health directors, completed in 1998 and 2008, to derive estimates of the extent of wraparound implementation in the United States and to better understand trends in how wraparound has been implemented and supported over time. Results from 2008 found that 88% of states reported having some type of wraparound program that conformed to the definition and provided an estimate of 100,000 children and families served via wraparound in that year. Between 1998 and 2008, states reported increased application of wraparound standards, a greater number of agencies involved in wraparound initiatives, and more formal evaluations of wraparound initiatives. Results provide substantiation of the widespread implementation of wraparound implementation in the United States, and evidence that the model is becoming more consistently supported by formal implementation structures over time.
Keywords: research, study, full text

National Trends in Implementing Wraparound: Results from the State Wraparound Survey, 2007
Author: Eric Bruns, April Sather, & Leyla Stambaugh
results from the State Wraparound Survey in 2007
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development

Navigating the Complexity of Using Research in Policy and Practice Decisions
Author: Susan Maciolek, Kathleen Biebel, Laurel Leslie, Gifty Debordes-Jackson, & Joanne Nicholson
This issue brief summarizes an in-press article that describes the role of research and expertise in the process of implementing Wraparound statewide in Massachusetts.
Keywords: legislation, policy

Needs and Services
Author: Partners for Kids and Families Submitted By: Marlene Penn
tips/techniques for identifying needs
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, priority, prioritize, need, outcome, goal

Needs Identification
Author: Family Partnership Institute Submitted By: Brad Norman
description of a process for identifying needs
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, priority, prioritize, need, outcome, goal

Needs Met Questionnaire
Author: King Cty / WA Federation
tool for rating/visualizing how well needs are being met in each domain
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, implement, indicators, progress, track, goal

New Jersey System of Care: Financing Overview
Author: Brian Hancock
overview of the funding involved in the New Jersey system of care
Keywords: finance, sustainability, state, model

New Jersey: Statewide Approach Utilizing Both Medicaid and Non-Medicaid Funds
Author: Bruce Kamradt
systems of care financing model
Keywords: finance, sustainability, state, model

New opportunities, new approaches: serving children with special health care needs under SCHIP
Author: Schwalberg, R., Hill, I., & Anderson Mathis, S.
OBJECTIVE: To identify models for caring for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) under the State Children's Health insurance Program (SCHIP) and to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of each. DATA SOURCE: Site visits in five study States conducted in late 1999. STUDY DESIGN: Approximately 12 to 15 interviews were conducted in each site with state and local-level policymakers, program administrators, providers, and families. DATA COLLECTION: Standard protocols were used across sites to explore a range of key policy variables including eligibility, enrollment , identification, and referral of CSHCN; benefits; service delivery systems; payment mechanisms; and quality assurance and monitoring strategies. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Each of the study States' approaches to serving CSHCN represents one of four models: a mainstream approach , a wrap-around model, a service carve out , or a specialized system of care. Special provisions designed to enhance the coverage and accessibility of services beyond those extended to children generally can help to ensure that CSHCN enrolled in SCHIP receive comprehensive, coordinated care. CONCLUSIONS: The mainstream approach , wh ile aimed at providing comprehensive care for all children , could not identify CSHCN or monitor their care. Wrap-around models, while offering rich benefits to CSHCN, rely on providers to identify eligible children , with few referrals reported to date. Service carve outs preserve long-standing specialty systems of care for CSH CN but create challenges for care coordination . Specialized systems of care present challenges for capitation but appear to offer the most promise for comprehensive, coordinated care to CSHCN.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Non-Negotiables: Orientation and Initial Training for Wrap Facilitators
Author: National Wraparound Initiative Workforce Group
A survey conducted by the Workforce work group of the National Wraparound Initiative
Keywords: human resource, training, coaching, coach, supervision, supervise, facilitators

NWI Core Group FAQ
Author: National Wraparound Initiative
Frequently asked questions about the NWI core group
Keywords: history, NWI, National Wraparound Initiative

NWI General Membership Survey: Formation of the Core Group
Author: National Wraparound Initiative
Keywords: accountability, data, outcome, monitoring, assessment, measure

NWI Impact Report
Author: Eric Bruns, April Sather, Janet Walker, Lisa Conlan, Carol LaForce
results of a survey about the impact of NWI
Keywords: history, NWI, National Wraparound Initiative

Opportunity for change: Exploring an alternative to residential treatment
Author: Brown, R. A., & Hill, B. A.
Describes the development and evaluation of a community-based program that provided an alternative to residential care by providing "wraparound" services to children with moderate to severe emotional difficulties. Program goals were preventing admission to residential care, maintaining children in the area, and assisting in early discharge planning from residential or nonresidential programs.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Options for Financing Care Management Entities: Wraparound Milwaukee's Pooled Funding Model
Author: Bruce Kamradt
funding model for wraparound milwaukee
Keywords: finance, sustainability, local, model

Outcomes for youth with severe emotional disturbance: A repeated measures longitudinal study of a wraparound approach of service delivery in systems of care
Author: Painter, K.
Background Systems of care is a family centered, strengths-based service delivery model for treating youth experiencing a serious emotional disturbance. Wraparound is the most common method of service delivery adopted by states and communities as a way to adhere to systems of care philosophy. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes for children ages 5–18 experiencing serious emotional disturbances who received wraparound in a systems of care community funded through a 6-year federal grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Grant # SM54497-06. This study evaluated the following hypotheses. (1) Youths diagnosed with a SED participating in wraparound services will experience improved mental health symptoms, improved functioning, and improved behavioral and emotional strengths. (2) Caregivers of youths diagnosed with a serious emotional disturbance participating in wraparound services will experience decreased levels of caregiver strain. Methods Youths were evaluated at intake (baseline) and every 6 months up to 24 months. Results All of the caregiver completed measurement instruments showed statistical and clinical levels of improvement in youth behavioral and emotional strengths, mental health symptoms, and caregiver stress by the 6-month data collection point that was sustained through 24-month. Youths rated themselves as having fewer problems than the ratings given by caregivers at intake. Changes across the youth rated instruments did not show significant improvement until the 12 or 18-month data points. The findings of this study are overall favorable for using a wraparound service delivery model in systems of care for youth experiencing a SED.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

OUTCOMES FOR YOUTH WITH SEVERE EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE: A REPEATED MEASURES LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF A WRAPAROUND APPROACH OF SERVICE DELIVERY IN SYSTEMS OF CARE
Author: Painter, K.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes for children ages 5–18 experiencing serious emotional disturbances who received wraparound in a systems of care community funded through a 6-year federal grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Grant # SM54497-06. This study evaluated the following hypotheses. (1) Youths diagnosed with a SED participating in wraparound services will experience improved mental health symptoms, improved functioning, and improved behavioral and emotional strengths. (2) Caregivers of youths diagnosed with a serious emotional disturbance participating in wraparound services will experience decreased levels of caregiver strain. All of the caregiver completed measurement instruments showed statistical and clinical levels of improvement in youth behavioral and emotional strengths, mental health symptoms, and caregiver stress by the 6-month data collection point that was sustained through 24-month.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Outcomes from wraparound and multisystemic therapy in a Center for Mental Health Services system-of-care demonstration site
Author: Stambaugh, L. F., Mustillo, S. A., Burns, B. J., Stephens, R. L., Baxter, B., Edwards, D., & DeKraai, M.
This study examined outcomes for 320 youth in a Center for Mental Health Services system-of-care demonstration site. Youth received wraparound-only (n = 213), MST-only (n = 54), or wraparound + MST (n = 53). Participants were 12 years old on average and mostly White (90%), and 75% were Medicaid-eligible. Service use and functional and clinical outcomes were examined at 6-month intervals out to 18 months.All three groups improved over the study period. The MST-only group demonstrated more clinical improvement than the other groups. Functional outcomes did not differ significantly across groups.Youth in wrap + MST had higher baseline severity and experienced less clinical and functional change than the other two groups, despite more mental health service use. Targeted, evidence-based treatment may be more effective than system-level intervention alone for improving clinical symptoms among youth with serious emotional disorders served in community-based settings. New or amended approaches may be needed for youth with the most severe disorders.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Overview to Wraparound: The Principles, Practice Model, Evidence Base, and Necessary Implementation Supports
Author: Eric Bruns & Janet Walker
webinar overview of wraparound
Keywords: principle, theory

Overview to Wraparound: The Principles, Practice Model, Evidence Base, and Necessary Implementation Supports: Poll
Author: [poll from webinar by Eric Bruns & Janet Walker]
webinar poll questions
Keywords: principle, theory

Owning Your Strengths - A Team Activity
Author: Family Partnership Institute Submitted By: Brad Norman
activity to use with whole team to think briefly about each member's strengths
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, strength

Parent Engagement and Family Peer Support Services in Wraparound (Poster)
Author: Gopalan, Geetha
Poster presented at the 28th Annual Children, Youth and Young Adult Mental Health Research & Policy Conference, March 22 - 25, 2015, Tampa, Florida.
Keywords: research, evaluation, family, youth

Participation Agreement Form from Wraparound Oregon (Spanish)
Author: Wraparound Oregon
agreement form
Keywords: language, interpretation, Spanish, translation, translate

Pennsylvania: Statewide Medicaid-Funded
Author: Bruce Kamradt
systems of care financing model
Keywords: finance, sustainability, state, model

Perceptions of family environment and wraparound processes: Associations with age and implications for serving transitioning youth in systems of care
Author: Haber, M. G., Cook, J. R., & Kilmer, R. P.
Addressing the unique needs of youth transitioning to adulthood has long been viewed as a priority in implementation of systems of care (SOCs) and wraparound. Developmental research and "practice-based evidence" suggest that there are differences between transitioning youth and their younger peers in family environment and wraparound team processes. Although these differences are thought to have significant implications for wraparound practice, few studies have examined them empirically. The present research involves two studies examining differences across several age cohorts (i.e., 10–12, 13, 14, 15, 16–17 year-olds) ranging from early adolescent to transitioning youth in: (1) caregiver perceptions of role-related strain and family environment quality, and (2) facilitator, caregiver, and youth perceptions of wraparound processes. In Study #1, older age was associated with higher levels of caregiver strain. In Study #2, age was associated with differences between youth and other team members' perceptions of wraparound processes, such that older youth perceived teams as less cohesive than others on their teams. These findings suggest that transitioning youth and their families merit special consideration in wraparound implementation and underscore the importance of considering the perceptions of transitioning youth in system change and practice improvement efforts.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

PERCEPTIONS OF FAMILY ENVIRONMENT AND WRAPAROUND PROCESSES: ASSOCIATIONS WITH AGE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR SERVING TRANSITIONING YOUTH IN SYSTEMS OF CARE
Author: Haber, M., Cook, J., & Kilmer, R.
Addressing the unique needs of youth transitioning to adulthood has long been viewed as a priority in implementation of systems of care (SOCs) and wraparound. Developmental research and ‘practice-based evidence’ suggest that there are differences between transitioning youth and their younger peers in family environment and wraparound team processes. Although these differences are thought to have significant implications for wraparound practice, few studies have examined them empirically. The present research involves two studies examining differences across several age cohorts (i.e., 10-12, 13, 14, 15, 16-17 year-olds) ranging from early adolescent to transitioning youth in: (1) caregiver perceptions of role-related strain and family environment quality, and (2) facilitator, caregiver, and youth perceptions of wraparound processes. In Study #1, older age was associated with higher levels of caregiver strain. In Study #2, age was associated with differences between youth and other team members’ perceptions of wraparound processes, such that older youth perceived teams as less cohesive than others on their teams. These findings suggest that transitioning youth and their families merit special consideration in wraparound implementation and underscore the importance of considering the perceptions of transitioning youth in system change and practice improvement efforts.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Phases and Activities of the Wraparound Process [standalone version]
Author: Janet Walker, Eric Bruns, J. D. VanDenBerg, J. Rast, T. W. Osher, P. Miles, J. Adams, & National Wraparound Initiative Advisory
Description of the activities that are necessary for true wraparound.
Keywords: process, description, practice, practice model

Phases and Activities of the Wraparound Process:Building Agreement about a Practice Model
Author: Janet Walker, Eric Bruns, & The National Wraparound Initiative Advisory Group
a look at the evolution of the wraparound process
Keywords: research, review

Phases and Activities of the Wraparound Process:Building Agreement about a Practice Model
Author: Janet Walker, Eric Bruns, & The National Wraparound Initiative Advisory Group
Keywords: process, description, practice, practice model

Photo Album
Author: Family Partnership Institute Submitted By: Brad Norman
activity to elicit information about strengths, culture, and natural supports
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, strength, need, culture

Plan of Care [sample]
Author: Ohana Coaching Submitted By: Laura Burger Lucas
wraparound milwaukee plan of care
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, action, step, need, outcome, goal

Planning for and Implementing System Change Using the Wraparound Process
Author: John Franz
information on planning for system change
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development

Planning for the Future: A Model for Using the Principles of Transition to Guide the Development of Behavior Intervention Plans
Author: Mueller, T., Gershwin Bassett, Diane S., Brewer, Robin D.
The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) mandates the implementation of a behavior intervention plan based on a functional behavioral assessment when a student's behavior necessitates disciplinary actions. However, IDEA does not provide any clear guidelines as to what the plans should contain nor how they can address behaviors that may affect a student's transition to postsecondary life. This article blends research in the areas of transition-focused planning and behavior into a framework that can be used for the development of transition-focused behavior intervention plans. Case study application strategies are presented, along with guidelines for practitioner implementation.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Practice and Process in Wraparound Teamwork
Author: Walker, J. S., & Schutte, K. M.
Collaborative family—provider teams have become an increasingly popular mechanism for creating and implementing individualized service and support plans for children and families with complex needs. In the context of children's mental health,this type of individualized service planning is most often known as wraparound, and it has become one of the primary strategies for implementing the system of care philosophy. A consensus has been reached about the values that underlie wraparound; however, less agreement exists regarding the specific techniques or procedures that translate the value base into practices at the team level. Difficulties in reaching agreement about guidelines or standards for wraparound practice are exacerbated by the lack of a theory describing how the wraparound process produces positive outcomes. This article brings together theory and research from a variety of sources in proposing a model of effectiveness for wraparound. The model specifies relationships between team practices, processes, and outcomes. The model is then used as a basis for recommending specific practices for wraparound teamwork.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Predictors of improvement for children served in developing systems of care
Author: Walton, B.
The research base regarding the effectiveness of systems of care for children with serious emotional disturbances is limited. The incremental development of systems of care in Indiana provides an opportunity to compare the outcomes of children served in these child and family wraparound teams with the outcomes of a matched sample of children receiving usual public mental health services. Functional assessment data from a state database was examined using logistic regression models. The level of development of wraparound services was used as a fidelity measure.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Prioritizing Needs
Author: Wraparound Milwaukee Submitted By: Mary Jo Meyers
tips/technique for prioritizing needs
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, priority, prioritize, need, outcome, goal

Private Provider & Wraparound Flexibility
Author: Doug Crandall
an overview of the Catholic Community Service Family Preservation System
Keywords: finance, sustainability

Process variables critical for team effectiveness: A Delphi study of wraparound team members
Author: Fleming, J. L., & Monda-Amaya, L. E.
Wraparound team members (n=20) identified as teaming experts rated 109 items that support team effectiveness across six categories: team goals, member roles and membership, communication, cohesion, logistics, and outcomes. Items in the team outcomes, goals, and cohesion categories were ranked most critical to team effectiveness.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Project Wraparound: A state-university partnership in training clinical psychologists to serve severely emotionally disturbed children
Author: Burchard, J. D., Clarke, R. T., Hamilton, R. I., & Fox, W. L.
Project Wraparound is an experimental demonstration project designed to maintain severely emotionally disturbed children in unrestrictive, mainstream settings through the provision of intensive services in the home, school, and community. Project Wraparound represents an attempt to develop and implement a more meaningful and effective service delivery system for severely emotionally disturbed children and their families / it actively incorporates the clinical psychology training program in that objective / clinical psychology trainees receive intensive training in the delivery of school-based services.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Providing a Range of Services to Fit the Needs of Youth in Community Mental Health Centers
Author: Smith-Boydston, J. M.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
PSYCHOMETRICS, RELIABILITY, AND VALIDITY OF A WRAPAROUND TEAM OBSERVATION MEASURE
Author: Bruns, E. J., Weathers, E. S., Suter, J. C., Hensley, S., Pullman, M. D., & Sather, A.
Reliable and valid measures of wraparound fidelity are needed to ensure effective implementation. This paper discusses one such instrument, the Team Observation Measure (TOM), by examining its psychometrics, reliability, and validity.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Pursuing Cost-Effectiveness in Mental Health Service Delivery for Youth with Complex Needs
Author: Katharine Grimes, et al.
An examination the cost-effectiveness of an intensively integrated, family and community-based clinical intervention for youth with mental health needs in comparison to "usual care.''
Keywords: finance, sustainability, cost, analysis, expenditure

Pursuing Cost-Effectiveness in Mental Health Service Delivery for Youth with Complex Needs
Author: Grimes, K. E., Schulz, M. F., Cohen, S. A., Mullin, B. O., Lehar, S. E., & Tien, S.
BACKGROUND: Mental health advocates seek to expand children's services, noting widespread failure to meet the needs of public sector youth suffering from serious emotional disturbance (SED). However, state and national budgets face deepening cuts, with rising health care costs taking the blame. As the gap between needs and finances widens, identification of cost-effective treatments that will benefit children with SED and their families is of increasing importance. Community-based interventions for this population, such as the wraparound approach and systems-of-care, are being disseminated but literature is scant regarding effects on expense. The Mental Health Services Program for Youth (MHSPY) model is aligned philosophically with wraparound and systems-of-care but unique in blending public agency dollars to deliver integrated medical, mental health and social services. MHSPY's linked clinical and expense data is useful to study community-based treatment cost-effectiveness. AIMS OF STUDY: To examine the cost-effectiveness of an intensively integrated, family and community-based clinical intervention for youth with mental health needs in comparison to "usual care.'' METHODS: Study and reference populations were matched on age, gender, community, psychiatric diagnosis, morbidity and insurance type. Claims analyses included patterns of service utilization and medical expense for both groups. Using propensity score matching, results for study youth are compared with results for the population receiving "usual care.'' Clinical functioning was measured for the intervention group at baseline and 12 months. RESULTS: The intervention group used lower intensity services and had substantially lower claims expense (e.g. 32% lower for emergency room, 74% lower for inpatient psychiatry) than their matched counterparts in the "usual care'' group. Intervention youth were consistently maintained in least restrictive settings, with over 88% of days spent at home and showed improved clinical functioning on standard measures. DISCUSSION: The intensive MHSPY model of service delivery offers potential as a cost-effective intervention for complex youth. Its integrated approach, recognizing needs across multiple life domains, appears to enhance engagement and the effectiveness of mental health treatment, resulting in statistically significant clinical improvements. Functional measures are not collected in "usual care,'' limiting comparisons. However, claims expense for intervention youth was substantially lower than claims expense for Medicaid comparison youth, suggesting clinical needs for intervention youth post-enrollment were lower than for those receiving "usual care.'' IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH CARE PROVISION AND USE: The MHSPY model, which intentionally engages families in "clustered'' traditional and non-traditional services, represents a replicable strategy for enhancing the impact of clinical interventions, thereby reducing medical expense. IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH POLICIES: Blending categorical state agency dollars and insurance funds creates flexibility to support community-based care, including individualized services for high-risk youth. Resulting expenses total no more, and are often less, than "treatment as usual'' but yield greater clinical benefits. IMPLICATIONS FOR FURTHER RESEARCH: Further research is needed regarding which intervention elements contribute the most towards improved clinical functioning, as well as which patients are most likely to benefit. A randomized trial of MHSPY vs. "usual care,'' including examination of the sustainability of effects post-disenrollment, would provide a chance to further test this innovative model.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

PURSUING COST-EFFECTIVENESS IN MENTAL HEALTH SERVICE DELIVERY FOR YOUTH WITH COMPLEX NEEDS
Author: Katherine E. Grimes, et al.
This article explores the cost-effectiveness of wraparound, system of care, and related strategies using data from the Mental Health Services Program for Youth in Massachusetts. The study found that outcomes were better and expenses were “no more, and usually less” for youth receiving services through MHSPY (versus usual care).
Keywords: research, study, full text

Qualifications for Wraparound Family Partners: A Statement from the National Wraparound Initiative
Author: National Wraparound Initiative Family Partner Task Force
This document presents the NWI Family Partner Task Force's final statement describing the experience and capacities that are needed in a person who wants to be employed as a family partner for wraparound. The document also highlights the particular parts of the statement that aroused some controversy during development, and describes how these controversies were resolved.
Keywords: family partner, parent partner, role, training, coaching, hiring

Qualities of Strong Families
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Brad Norman
list of ideas overarching strengths and possible uses for it
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, strength, need, culture

Quality and Individualization in Wraparound Team Planning
Author: Walker, J. S., & Schutte, K.
In children’s mental health, collaborative, team-based individualized service planning is most commonly known as wraparound, and has become one of the primary strategies for improving services and outcomes for children with the highest levels of need. We report on analyses of data gathered at 72 wraparound team meetings from communities around the United States. We describe the composition of the teams and the quality of the planning process they engaged in, and explore the extent to which these factors were associated with team member satisfaction and the individualization of plans. Teams in our study were numerically dominated by professionals. Parents attended a large majority of meetings, participation by youth and family advocates was frequent, participation by other family members infrequent, and participation by other members of the family’s informal or natural support networks rare. Observed teams varied considerably in the quality of their planning process and the degree of individualization of plans. Higher-quality planning was significantly associated with increased individualization of plans and with team member satisfaction with meeting productivity.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

QUALITY INDICATORS FOR MULTIDISCIPLINARY TEAM FUNCTIONING IN COMMUNITY-BASED CHILDREN’S MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
Author: Kutash, K., Acri, M., Pollock, M., Armusewicz, K., Serene Olin, S., Hoagwood, K. E.
The current study examined the organizational social context in 21 community-based programs serving youth at-risk for out-of-home care due to emotional or behavioral disorders and their families and program performance on five quality indicators of team functioning in teams that included a family support specialist. Results indicate that programs with higher performance on structures to facilitate teamwork, informal communication mechanisms among team members, and the ability to integrate family support specialists as equal members of the team showed more positive organizational functioning. Implications for the role of quality indicators in health care reform efforts are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Realist Evaluation in Wraparound: A New Approach in Social Work Evidence-Based Practice
Author: Kazi, M. A. F., Pagkos, B., & Milch, H. A.
The purpose of this study was to develop a realist evaluation paradigm in social work evidence-based practice. Method: Wraparound (at Gateway-Longview Inc., New York) used a reliable outcome measure and an electronic database to systematically collect and analyze data on the interventions, the client demographics and circumstances, and the outcomes. Results: Research designs (e.g., single-system and group) can fall into place naturally and patterns in the data can be investigated using data analysis approaches such as binary logistic regression. Conclusions: Realist evaluation can be performed at regular intervals when an outcome measure is repeated, with the purpose of investigating what interventions work and in what circumstances.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Reducing juvenile recidivism: Evaluating the wraparound services model
Author: Carney, M. M., & Buttell, F.
Objective: The purpose of this study was to (a) evaluate the relative effectiveness of wraparound services versus conventional services for juvenile delinquent youth and (b) create a predictive model that would assist the juvenile court system in correctly identifying youth at greatest risk of reoffending. Method: The study employed a pretest/posttest, control group design, with 6-, 12-, and 18-month follow-up assessments, of 141 youth court-ordered into community-based treatment programs for delinquent youth. Results: Analysis indicated that few of the variables studied differentiated between wraparound services recipients and conventional service recipients. However, a logistic regression model was developed that correctly predicted recidivism for 79% of the sample at the 6-month follow-up assessment (chi-square = 27.211, df =6, p = .0001) and 78% of the sample at the 18-month follow-up assessment (chi-square = 16.453, df =8, p = .036). Conclusions: Implications of the findings for improving community-based juvenile diversion programs for delinquent youth were explored and discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Referral Form from Wraparound Oregon (Spanish)
Author: Wraparound Oregon
Keywords: language, interpretation, Spanish, translation, translate

Relations between program and system variables and fidelity to the wraparound process for children and families
Author: Bruns, E. J., Suter, J. C., & Leverentz-Brady, K. M.
OBJECTIVE: Past research and experience have indicated that characteristics of organizations and service systems influence the quality of mental health services delivery. The study aimed to illuminate such associations by examining the relationship between a set of program- and system-level variables and fidelity to the wraparound model for children and families. METHODS: A measure of fidelity to the wraparound process for children and families (the Wraparound Fidelity Index) was administered to families receiving services in eight mental health agencies across the United States. Program administrators at each agency also completed by telephone a standardized interview for assessing program and system conditions hypothesized to influence quality of implementation (Program Administrator version of the Wraparound Fidelity Index). Regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between program and system variables and fidelity. RESULTS: Results of interviews with program administrators revealed substantial variation across programs in the number and type of program and system supports for wraparound implementation. Regression analyses found a significant association between the number of organizational and system supports and Wraparound Fidelity Index scores. CONCLUSIONS: Results support the hypothesized relationship between program and system conditions and the quality of service delivery. Results also highlight the importance of engineering the system and organizational context (maintaining low caseload sizes, establishing interagency partnerships, and implementing accountability mechanisms) in order to provide a solid foundation for high-quality wraparound to children and families.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Release of Information Form from Wraparound Oregon (Spanish)
Author: Wraparound Oregon
form for information release
Keywords: language, interpretation, Spanish, translation, translate

Release of Information Form from Wraparound Oregon (Spanish)
Author: Wraparound Oregon
Information release form in Spanish
Keywords: Spanish, translation, translate

Reliability of the Wraparound Observation Form-Second Version: An instrument designed to assess the fidelity of the wraparound approach
Author: Nordness, P. D., & Epstein, M. H.
The push to rapidly implement the wraparound approach for families of children with serious emotional disturbance (SED) has resulted in a number of service models that may or may not be in accordance with its theoretical foundation. Given the number of wraparound programs being implemented nationwide, the need to develop instruments that can measure the fidelity of wraparound services in a reliable manner should not be ignored. The purpose of this study was to examine the interobserver agreement of the Wraparound Observation Form--Second Version (WOF-2), an observation system designed to assess the fidelity of wraparound services. Observations were conducted across 30 family planning meetings where wraparound services were provided. The mean percentage agreement across the 48 items was 96.7% (range 83.3-100%) and the average kappa statistic was 0.886 (range = 0.318-1.0). On the basis of these results, the WOF-2 appears to be a reliable instrument for assessing the delivery of wraparound services.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Reliability of the Wraparound Observation Form: An instrument to measure the wraparound process
Author: Epstein, M. H., Jayanthi, M., McKelvey, J., Frankenberry, E., Hardy, R., Dennis, K., & Dennis, K.
Within the past decade, the wraparound approach has gained significant popularity in providing services to children with challenging social and family needs. While a plethora of wraparound programs have been developed and studies have been conducted to assess their effectiveness, the need to develop instruments that measure the implementation of wraparound services is clear. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the reliability of a scale that measures wraparound services. In this study, the Wraparound Observation Form (WOF), was developed to evaluate the implementation of the wraparound process in treatment planning meetings. The WOF includes 34 closed-ended items that requires the respondent to note the occurrence or non-occurrence of specific events or behaviors at treatment planning meetings. In the present study, two data collectors attended planning meetings and independently completed the WOF. The inter-rater reliability was 95%. The WOF appears to be a reliable instrument and be appropriate in evaluating wraparound services.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Request for Information from NWI Advisors [cost for language interpreters]
Author: National Wraparound Initiative
information request form
Keywords: language, interpretation, translation, translate

Research on the Wraparound Process: Intervention Components and Implementation Supports
Author: Eric Bruns & Janet Walker
This article by the NWI co-directors introduces the Journal of Child and Family Services special issue on wraparound.
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development

Research on the wraparound process: Intervention components and implementation supports
Author: Bruns, E. J., & Walker, J. S.
In 1996, when the time since the advent of “systems of care” (Stroul and Friedman 1996) for youths with serious emotional and behavioral problems was still measured in terms of years and not decades, this journal provided the children’s services field with a landmark Special Issue focused on research on the wraparound process and individualized services for children with complex needs (Clark and Clarke 1996). The Special Issue aimed to provide the first comprehensive academic perspective on wraparound, which was at the time one of a variety of “innovative alternatives to highly restrictive, categorical services and costly institutional care” (p. 2), on which outcomes studies were only beginning to be published...these issues remain important today, especially with respect to developing consistent, empirically supported implementation strategies for use by states, communities, and provider organizations that have chosen to provide wraparound. Although we have documented the potential effectiveness of certain methods for using training and coaching to achieve fidelity and outcomes (Bruns et al. 2006), we also continue to see great variation in implementation fidelity nationally, with predictable negative impacts on outcome (Bruns et al. 2008; Bruns et al. in submission). Well into the twenty-first century, concerns remain about our capacity to use theory and research to systematically establish standards for wraparound practice and implementation support.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

RESEARCH ON THE WRAPAROUND PROCESS: INTERVENTION COMPONENTS AND IMPLEMENTATION SUPPORTS
Author: Eric J. Bruns & Janet S. Walker.
This article introduces the Journal of Child and Family Services’ Special Issue on wraparound.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Research study of the wraparound process in Nevada
Author: Mears, S. L.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Residential trajectories of participants in North Carolina's Willie-M. Program: A semi-parametric group based model
Author: Nash, J. K., Thompson, S., & Kim, J. S.
A semi-parametric mixture model was fit using data on 611 children with serious emotional disturbance who participated in North Carolina's Willie-M. Program from 1995 to 2000 to identify patterns of residential restrictiveness over time. Results revealed 4 distinct restrictiveness trajectories: low/stable, high/stable, increasing, and decreasing. Correlates of trajectory group membership included age, IQ, initial behavior, and region of the state. Number of diagnoses and change in behavior did not predict group membership. Interpretation of results is guided by a consideration of the goal of wraparound systems of care to provide services and supports in community based and normalizing settings.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Restructuring Schools through the Wraparound Approach: The LADSE Experience
Author: Eber, L.
The La Grange Area Department of Special Education's (LADSE) Wraparound Project (WRAP) is a five year school-based systems change initiative for students with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD) and their families. WRAP is focused on improving outcomes for these students and their families by converting the existing categorical special education and mental health services into a more integrated and flexible system (Eber, 1993). This systems change initiative culminated in the restructuring of special education programs into the LADSE EBD Network beginning with the 1994-95 school year. This network embodies the wraparound approach and integrates mental health, education and other family-focused services in a comprehensive school-based model. This article describes the progressive development of wraparound pilots and projects and the resulting restructured education service network which has been developed in the LADSE community. Evaluation data, which has been used to shape decision-making throughout the development of the LADSE EBD Network, is discussed in the context of the systems change process. Implications for the field are also considered.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Rethinking the System of Care in Manitoba
Author: Bartlett, N., & Freeze, R.
A system of care for children and youth with severe emotional and behavioural disorders, as outlined by Stroul & Friedman (1986, 1994) has been mandated for social service providers in the province of Manitoba. However, this model of service delivery has not been entirely effective in promoting collaboration among service providers. In this article, an immanent critique (Skrtic, 1995) of the Manitoba system of care is presented, with suggestions for reconstructing the delivery of services to children and adolescents with severe emotional and behavioural disorders. Alternative decision making models that promote collaboration, such wraparound services and transdisciplinary teaming are discussed. In addition, organizational and professional practices that promote shared accountability, such as clinical case management, family centered intensive case management, shared access to information, and a single point of entry to receive service are explored.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Return on Investment in Systems of Care for Children with Behavioral Health Challenges
Author: Stroul, B.A., Pires, S.A., Boyce, S., Krivelyova, A., & Walrath, C.
Published by the National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, this report documents the latest knowledge about return on investment (specifically cost savings) in systems of care. It summarizes data from national studies and from states and other communities.
Keywords: finance, sustainability, cost, analysis, expenditure, expenditures, study, research

Return on Investment in Systems of Care for Children With Behavioral Health Challenges: A Look at Wraparound
Author: Beth Stroul
This is a summary of a larger work by the National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health (available from: http://www.nwi.pdx.edu/pdf/ReturnonInvestmentinSOCsReport6-15-14.pdf).
Keywords: research, review, finance, sustainability, cost, analysis, expenditure, expenditures

Reuniting families and breaking the cycle: a research note
Author: Bednar, S. G.
Rapidly escalating incarceration rates for female offenders create a crisis not only for offenders, but also for an estimated 1.3 million children each year, who depend on these women for care. Offenders being released back into their communities often face staggering obstacles, including poverty, unemployment, inadequate housing, untreated health mental health, and substance abuse problems, and numerous family problems. High recidivism rates and concerns for the next generation have prompted some communities to focus on assisting female offenders through the transition process. One innovative effort in Central Indiana involves the provision of strengths-based Wraparound services to women and their families starting during late stages of incarceration, and continuing through the transition and stabilization in the community. The Women's Transition Project Care Coordination program is anticipated to facilitate female offenders' re-integration into their communities, promote family reunification, and lower recidivism rates.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Reviewing Referral Information from the Parent's Perspective
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Pat Miles
Tool for reviewing service history from a parent/family perspective.
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan

Rey: An Intensive Single Case Study of a Probation Youth with Immigrant Background Participating in Wraparound Santa Cruz
Author: Barbara Lutz
This intensive single case study highlights the impact of the local wraparound program (WRAP) on a 16-year old probation youth of immigrant background.
Keywords: research, study, culture, cultural competence

Safety Plan [sample]
Author: Ohana Coaching Submitted By: Laura Burger Lucas
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, crisis, safety

Sample Collaborative Team Planning Form #1
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Lucille Eber
Complete sample plan including strengths, goals, activities and method for tracking outcomes (last page)
Keywords: tool, progress, planning, plan, implement, indicators, track, goal

Sample Collaborative Team Planning Form #2
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Lucille Eber
Complete sample plan including strengths, goals, activities and method for tracking outcomes (last page)
Keywords: tool, progress, planning, plan, implement, indicators, track, goal

Sample Plan of Care
Author: Patricia Miles Submitted By: Pat Miles
sample plan of care arranged by life domains
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, priority, prioritize, need, outcome, goal

Sample Strength and Need Summary
Author: Patricia Miles Submitted By: Pat Miles
sample strengths summary
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, priority, prioritize, culture, outcome, goal

Satisfaction, involvement, and unconditional care: The perceptions of children and adolescents receiving wraparound services
Author: Rosen, L. D., Heckman, T., Carro, M. G., & Burchard, J. D.
Surveyed 20 youths (aged 11–19 yrs) with severe emotional and behavioral problems who were receiving community-based, wraparound services regarding their satisfaction, sense of involvement, and feelings of unconditional (UC) care (i.e., the S's sense that his or her caretakers would remain stable regardless of what happened). Each of these variables was in turn related to behavioral adjustment. Results show that both Ss' sense of involvement and their perceptions that their care was UC were strongly associated with satisfaction with services. However, neither satisfaction nor involvement were correlated with the severity of Ss' acting-out behaviors (AOBs). Ss' perception that care was UC was strongly, negatively correlated with the severity of AOBs. Thus, while the relationship between satisfaction and behavior remained unclear, it appeared that Ss' perceptions of the stability of their services played a role in their AOB.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

School as the Entry Point: Assessing Adherence to the Basic Tenets of the Wraparound Approach
Author: Epstein, M. H., Nordness, P. D., Gallagher, K., Nelson, J. R., Lewis, L., & Schrepf, S.
In an effort to address the problem behaviors of children and youth, professionals have advocated for the implementation of three-tiered prevention programs: primary, secondary, and tertiary. The wraparound approach has been advanced as an appropriate tertiary program that can be used to address the complex behaviors and needs of students and their families. Although researchers have explored adherence to the basic tenets of the wraparound approach when community mental health settings serve as the entry point, it appears that there is virtually no description or information on adherence when schools serve as the entry point. The purpose of this study was to examine adherence to the basic tenets of the wraparound approach when the school serves as the entry point. Results from 112 observations identified some strengths and weaknesses in the adherence to the basic tenets of the wraparound approach when school serves as the entry point. Limitations, future research needs, and practical implications are discussed. (Contains 2 tables.)
Keywords: research, study, abstract

School Sector Coordinator Job Description
Author: [not available]
job description
Keywords: human resource, training, coaching, coach, supervision, supervise

School-based applications of the wraparound process: Early results on service provision and student outcomes
Author: Eber, L., Osuch, R., & Redditt, C. A.
The application of a school-based wraparound approach presents different challenges, perspectives, and knowledge from those seen in mental health or child welfare settings. For the past three years, the La Grange Area Department of Special Education's Wraparound Project has been implementing a school-based individualized service network that is now being integrated into the larger local and state special education, mental health, and social service systems. We present school-based applications of wraparound for students with emotional and behavioral disabilities, including the community and system context, program application, evaluation process and preliminary results. Students who were identified through self-contained special education classrooms were compared to students who were identified from various other school and mental health settings. Students from the school-based program were less clinically involved than students identified from other settings. Service provision differed between program groups and by out-of-home experiences. Finally, the use of wraparound approaches across a variety of educational settings to prevent out-of-school and out-of-home care are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

School-Based Wraparound for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Challenges
Author: Eber, L., & et al.
Describes a process, wraparound planning, for extending educational services to students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) and their families. A merger of community and school-based wraparound is being implemented in pilot school districts in Illinois. Guidelines for implementing school-based wraparound for students with EBD are provided and implications for school organization are drawn.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

SCHOOL-BASED WRAPAROUND PLANNING: Integrating Services for Students With Emotional and Behavioral Needs
Author: Eber, L., & Nelson, C. M.
The wraparound process for planning unique and flexible services emerged from community-based human-service programs for children and youth exhibiting serious emotional disturbance. The application of wraparound in schools is described and illustrated via examples of local, statewide, and national initiatives. These experiences suggest strategies that can improve the school's effectiveness in serving students with, or at risk of, emotional and behavioral challenges.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Search Institute's Framework of Developmental Assets
Author: Search Institute
list of areas for strengths and competencies
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, strength, need, culture, youth

SEEING WRAPAROUND PRACTICE THROUGH THE LENS OF IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE
Author: Matarese, M., Zabel, M., Hust, J. A., & Bruns, E.
This presentation covers core theories and concepts of implementation science, and how it is applied to successful implementation of systems of care and the wraparound practice model. Learning objectives include using the lens of implementation science to learn of specific strategies to address the major implementation issues often associated with implementing wraparound, and identifying and addressing implementation barriers and implementation support needs in local or state systems of care.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Seeing Wraparound Practice through the Lens of Implementation Science [presentation]
Author: Marlene Matarese, Michelle Zabel, Joe Ann Hust, & Eric Bruns
This presentation covers core theories and concepts of implementation science, and how it is applied to successful implementation of systems of care and the wraparound practice model.
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development

Seeing Wraparound Practice through the Lens of Implementation Science [presentation]
Author: Marlene Matarese, Michelle Zabel, Joe Ann Hust, & Eric Bruns
This presentation covers core theories and concepts of implementation science, and how it is applied to successful implementation of systems of care and the wraparound practice model.
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development

Semantic equivalence of assessment instruments across cultures
Author: Singh, N. N., Baker, J., Winton, A. S., & Lewis, D. K.
It is informed that with the proliferation of mental health service delivery models for children and adolescents with mental health problems, there have been increased demands to provide data attesting to the benefits that accrue with the use of each of these models. Children and adolescents with emotional and behavioral disorders form a culturally diverse group. There are few standardized assessment instruments that may be used with all children and adolescents regardless of their cultural heritage and personal life experiences. Typically, the assessment instruments used in assessing children and adolescents with emotional and behavioral disorders have been developed from a Caucasian perspective. Although the developers of some instruments have attempted to include normative samples of participants from diverse cultures, rarely have these instruments fulfilled the methodological requirements for a valid instrument that can be used with children and adolescents from different cultures. There are five psychometric properties of assessment instruments that can be used to determine which instruments will provide valid baseline and outcome measures of child and adolescent functioning. These include content validity, semantic validity, technical validity, criterion validity, and conceptual validity. An instrument is considered culturally equivalent in two cultures if it meets the criterion of equivalence on one or more of the five types of validity.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Services for high-risk populations in systems of care
Author: Kamradt, B., Gilbertson, S. A., & Jefferson, M.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Single Plan of Care -- Safety Plan
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Beth Larson-Steckler
Blank template for safety plan
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, crisis, safety

Single Plan of Care Template
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Beth Larson-Steckler
blank plan template
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, action, step, need, outcome, goal

Single Plan of Care-- Safety Plan
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Beth Larson-Steckler
Blank template for safety plan
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, crisis, safety

Single Plan of Care-- Strengths Assessment
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Beth Larson-Steckler
blank template for recording strengths by domain
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, strength, need, culture

Social Support Network Matrix
Author: Equipo Submitted By: Kathy Lazear
blank matrix of types of social support and sources
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, strength, need, culture, youth

Social Supports for Youth and Families
Author: Kernan, J. B., & Morilus-Black, M.
Social supports for youth and families receiving mental health services are important for family success and sustainability of systems of care. The goal of our study was to determine what help and support families and youth receive and from whom they receive it. We surveyed youth and families enrolled in community wraparound care coordination to determine the support they receive. The social supports questionnaire measures include: the kinds of help and support that the parent/caregiver and youth received from people in the past 6 months, and the kinds of people who helped the parent/caregiver and youth in the past 6 months. Results show that social support networks are weak for both family and youth. Variations in scores suggest that wraparound family teams should focus on strategies that enhance the development of social supports. Data collected at 6-month followup were analyzed to determine if families and youth have increased their social support networks and expanded the kinds of people that provide support to them. Our research question is "What kinds of help and social support do youth and families receive and from whom do they receive it?".
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Spreadsheets, service providers, and the statehouse: Using data and the wraparound process to reform systems for children and families
Author: Bruns, E. J., Rast, J., Peterson, C., Walker, J., & Bosworth, J.
Evaluation descriptions in the research literature tend to ignore the full context of the community change efforts from which they emerged. In this paper, we describe a range of evaluation studies and data collection activities conducted over the course of one state's effort to reform its child welfare system on behalf of families with children experiencing serious mental health problems. Initial activities included studies of the prevalence of unmet mental health need in children and youth in the state. As these needs were addressed, evaluation activities examined the impact of a pilot wraparound program that became a major part of systems reform. Later efforts included implementation analysis of wraparound programs and assessment of priorities for continued systems reform. As we describe this set of evaluation activities, we discuss how data collection evolved to meet the needs of stakeholders over time and consider lessons learned about the roles of research and information sharing in shaping community change efforts.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Staff Practices-- Interagency Team Meetings
Author: Indiana Behavioral Health Choice Submitted By: Janet McIntyre
tips/techniques for ensuring that wraparound is strengths based
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, rule, ground rules

Statewide Children's Wraparound Initiative: Information Management System Assessment
Author: Care Oregon
assessment of information management system
Keywords: accountability, data, data system, system

Strategies for Identifying Key Players in the Life of a Child...
Author: Wraparound Milwaukee Submitted By: Mary Jo Meyers
tips for identifying natural supports
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, strength, need, culture, youth

Strategies to Assist Parent Peer Support Implementation in the Wraparound Workforce
Author: Joe Ann Hust
This article, originally published in the TA Telescope (January, 2015), introduces the National Wraparound Implementation Center's (NWIC) model of parent peer support. It describes the importance of parent peer support specialists in Wraparound and best practices for Wraparound sites that incorporate these roles in their programs.
Keywords: family partner, parent partner, role, training, coaching

Strategies to Support Youth With Serious Behavioral Health Needs Through a Care Management Entity Approach
Author: Taylor Hendricks
This article, originally published in the TA Telescope (January, 2015), highlights a unique collaborative model in New Jersey that is helping youth and families address behavioral health issues and create long-term plans for recovery. It gives some background on Care Management Entities (CMEs) in general and illustrates their implementation in New Jersey.
Keywords: state, model, finance, community, partnership, collaboration

Strengthening Practice through Directive Supervision
Author: Debbie Manners, Tonya Nowakowski, Gloria Spaulding, & Patricia Miles
Keywords: human resource, training, coaching, coach, supervision, supervise, tools

Strengthening Practice through Directive Supervision: Poll
Author: [poll from webinar by Debbie Manners, Tonya Nowakowski, Gloria Spaulding, & Patricia Miles]
Keywords: human resource, training, coaching, coach, supervision, supervise, tools

Strengthening Practice through Directive Supervision: Poll
Author: [poll from webinar by Lucille Eber & Sara Teeter]
Keywords: setting, school

Strengths Genogram
Author: Family Partnership Institute Submitted By: Brad Norman
tool for eliciting strengths and visualizing family connections through strengths
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, strength, need, culture

Strengths Summary
Author: Ohana Coaching Submitted By: Laura Burger Lucas
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, priority, culture, prioritize, outcome, goal

Strengths-based, individualized services in systems of care
Author: Rotto, K., McLntyre, J. S., & Serkin, C.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Strengths, Needs, and Culture Discovery
Author: Henderson Mental Health Center Submitted By: Sue Thomas
list of domains for exploring--and form for recording--strengths, needs, culture
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, implement, indicators, progress, track, goal

Structure for the NWI Community of Practice
Author: National Wraparound Initiative
Keywords: history, NWI, National Wraparound Initiative

Success with Wraparound: A Collaborative, Individualized, Integrated & Strength-Based Model
Author: Wyles, P.
A model of service delivery called Wraparound, which was developed in the USA, focuses on maximising collaboration between stakeholders, including the client and their support network, as well as services involved. It is used extensively in the disability, mental health, juvenile justice, education and out-of-home care fields across America. This paper reviews the literature exploring evaluations of the model and also examines an example of the application of Wraparound in an Australian context - the Turnaround program in the [Australian Capital Territory] ACT - and its preliminary evaluation. Finally, challenges and opportunities for the model are considered.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Summary of the Wraparound Evidence Base: April 2010 Update
Author: Eric Bruns & Jesse Suter
summary of evidence base
Keywords: research, evaluation, review

Supporting Workforce Development: Lessons Learned from Wraparound Milwaukee
Author: Mary Jo Meyers
a look at what Wraparound Milwaukee has taught us
Keywords: human resource, training

Supporting Wraparound Implementation
Author: Bruce Kamradt, Michelle Zabel, & Janet Walker
emerging themes for developing your system
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development

Supporting Wraparound Implementation: Overview
Author: Janet Walker
overview of wraparound implementation and support
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development

Supporting Wraparound Implementation: Poll
Author: [poll from webinar by Bruce Kamradt, Michelle Zabel, & Janet Walker]
poll about wraparound implementation and support
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development

Systems of care, wraparound services, and home-based services
Author: Poncin, Y., & Woolston, J.
Systems of care (SOCs) and wraparound services represent philosophies of care rather than programs with clearly specified elements of treatment. An SOC recognizes the importance of family, school, and the community at large in a child’s overall health. The informal and formal supports and services available in a given community and their linkage comprise the SOC, and coordinating access to services within the larger community is an integral part of an SOC. Wraparound services are one approach to working with families using an SOC philosophy. Wraparound “wraps” services in the community around a child and family, according to the individualized needs of the family. Wraparound has a specifically defined clinical and theoretical orientation and is concerned with the process of how a child and family are engaged to create a service plan that accesses or creates the relevant services available in the community. Core features of wraparound and SOCs include engagement with the family from a strength-based and culturally competent perspective and respecting the family’s own perception of their needs and goals, along with helping them to obtain services to meet those goals (Walker and Bruns 2006). The wraparound process became the favored approach to implementing the SOC philosophy when SOC programs first emerged; therefore, the two terms are closely linked.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Systems of Care: New Partnerships for Community Psychology
Author: Cook, J. R., & Kilmer, R. P.
For almost two decades, the federal government has supported the development of integrated models of mental health service delivery for children and families, known as systems of care (SOCs), that strive to be child-centered, family-focused, community-based, and culturally competent. These efforts align well with the values and principles (e.g., empowerment, collaboration, strengths emphasis, focus on macro-level social/system change) central to community psychology (CP; Kloos et al. in Community psychology, Cengage Learning, Belmont, 2012). Despite the convergence of many core values, CPs have historically been underrepresented in key roles in SOC initiatives. However, this has changed in recent years, with increasing examples of community psychology skills and principles applied to the development, implementation, and evaluation of SOCs. Because successful and sustainable implementation of SOCs requires community and system-level change, and SOCs are increasingly being urged to adopt a stronger "public health" orientation (Miles et al. in A public health approach to children's mental health: a conceptual framework, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Washington, DC, 2010), there is great potential for CPs to play important roles in SOCs. This paper discusses opportunities and roles for CPs in SOCs in applied research and evaluation, community practice, and training.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Taking Wraparound to Scale: Moving Beyond Grant Funding
Author: Dayana Simons
This article, published in the TA Telescope (January, 2015), discusses opportunities for taking Wraparound to scale through provisions in the Affordable Care Act and other federal funding options.
Keywords: finance, sustainability

Team Agreements/Norms
Author: Family Partnership Institute Submitted By: Brad Norman
list of expectations for team members
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, rule, ground rules

Team Finding Activity-- People in Your Community
Author: Family Partnership Institute Submitted By: Brad Norman
structure for reviewing possible natural/community supports
Keywords: tool, strength, planning, plan, need, culture

Team Finding Activity-- Your Family
Author: Family Partnership Institute Submitted By: Brad Norman
structure for reviewing family connections
Keywords: tool, strength, planning, plan, need, culture

Ten Principles of the Wraparound Process (standalone version)
Author: Eric Bruns, Janet Walker, J. Adams, Patricia Miles, Trina Osher, J. Rast, J. D. VanDenBerg, & National Wraparound Initiative Ad Submitted By: Janet Walker
Describes the values that guide the wraparound process.
Keywords: principle, theory

The Application of the Ten Principles of the Wraparound Process to the Role of Family Partners on Wraparound Teams [standalone v
Author: Marlene Penn & Trina Osher
This document briefly describes what the Family Partner does on wraparound teams to put each of the “Ten Principles of the wraparound process” into practice
Keywords: principle, theory, family partner

The Art of Wraparound in the Child Welfare Environment
Author: Patricia Nellius-Guthrie & Hellen Howe
webinar about wraparound in child welfare contexts
Keywords: setting, child welfare

The Art of Wraparound in the Child Welfare Environment: Poll
Author: [poll from webinar by Patricia Nellius-Guthrie & Hellen Howe]
poll about wraparound in child welfare contexts
Keywords: setting, child welfare

The Building Bridges Initiative: Residential and Community-Based Providers, Families, and Youth Coming Together to Improve Outcomes
Author: Blau, G. M., Caldwell, B., Fisher, S. K., Kuppinger, A., Levison-Johnson, J., & Lieberman, R.
The Building Bridges Initiative (BBI) provides a framework for achieving positive outcomes for youth and families served in residential and community programs. Founded on core principles, an emerging evidence base, and acknowledged best practices, the BBI emphasizes collaboration and coordination between providers, families, youth, advocates, and policymakers to achieve its aims. Examples are presented of successful state, community, and provider practice changes, and available tools and resources to support all constituencies in achieving positive outcomes.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

The Community Supports for Wraparound Inventory: An Assessment of the Implementation Context for Wraparound
Author: Janet Walker & Becca Sanders
The Community Supports for Wraparound Inventory (CSWI) was developed to respond to the need for an assessment of the extent to which a community has developed system-level capacity to implement wraparound. This article reports on a study that evaluated the reliability and validity of the CSWI for use in communities implementing wraparound. Findings indicate that the CSWI shows promise as a reliable, valid and useful tool.
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development

The Community Supports for Wraparound Inventory: An assessment of the implementation context for wraparound
Author: Walker, J. S., & Sanders, B.
The wraparound process has emerged as perhaps the most frequently implemented comprehensive approach for planning and providing individualized, community-based care for children and adolescents with serious mental health conditions. Providing comprehensive care through the wraparound process necessarily requires a high level of collaboration across organization and agency boundaries. This need for significant inter-agency or 'system-level' collaboration creates a complex implementation environment for wraparound. It is therefore not surprising that creating and sustaining a hospitable implementation environment has proven to be extremely challenging. For the people who are responsible for managing the inter-organizational collaboration, it is not easy to evaluate the adequacy of local system-level support for wraparound and to see exactly what kinds of supports are lacking or where system-development efforts should focus. Furthermore, as system-development strategies are put into practice, it can be difficult to assess whether or not meaningful progress is occurring. The Community Supports for Wraparound Inventory (CSWI) was developed to respond to the need for an assessment of the extent to which a community has developed system-level capacity to implement wraparound. This article reports on a study that evaluated the reliability and validity of the CSWI for use in communities implementing wraparound. Findings indicate that the CSWI shows promise as a reliable, valid and useful tool.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

THE COMMUNITY SUPPORTS FOR WRAPAROUND INVENTORY: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPLEMENTATION CONTEXT FOR WRAPAROUND
Author: Janet S. Walker & Becca Sanders.
The wraparound process has emerged as perhaps the most frequently implemented comprehensive approach for planning and providing individualized, community-based care for children and adolescents with serious mental health conditions. Providing comprehensive care through the wraparound process necessarily requires a high level of collaboration across organization and agency boundaries. This need for significant inter-agency or “system-level” collaboration creates a complex implementation environment for wraparound. It is therefore not surprising that creating and sustaining a hospitable implementation environment has proven to be extremely challenging. For the people who are responsible for managing the inter-organizational collaboration, it is not easy to evaluate the adequacy of local system-level support for wraparound and to see exactly what kinds of supports are lacking or where system-development efforts should focus. Furthermore, as system-development strategies are put into practice, it can be difficult to assess whether or not meaningful progress is occurring. The Community Supports for Wraparound Inventory (CSWI) was developed to respond to the need for an assessment of the extent to which a community has developed system-level capacity to implement wraparound. This article reports on a study that evaluated the reliability and validity of the CSWI for use in communities implementing wraparound. Findings indicate that the CSWI shows promise as a reliable, valid and useful tool.
Keywords: research, study, full text

The complexities of implementing a wraparound approach to service provision: A view from the field
Author: McGinty, K., McCammon, S. L., & Koeppen, V. P.
The authors offer the perspective of several service providers on the benefits and barriers encountered in implementing the wraparound model within the context of a federally funded project to enhance a local system of care. The Pitt Edgecombe Nash-Public Academic Liaison project was instituted in three rural counties in Eastern North Carolina. A hallmark of this program was the role of families as treatment partners with the emphasis on collaboration among agencies, families and service providers. The actual process is organized by a service coordinator and led by an individual service team. While implementing the wraparound model, benefits and barriers were encountered at all levels of intervention. The authors suggest that quality-monitoring efforts should include the task of assessing implementation on an ongoing basis with an emphasis on analysis of the barriers and benefits encountered and subsequent midstream corrections to improve the wraparound model for each individual community.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

The Cost of Collaboration: Predictors of Hours Spent in Collateral Contacts
Author: Gordon, M., Antshel, K. M., & Lewandowski, L.
Collateral contacts, while at the heart of wraparound care, are time consuming and often nonreimbursable. This column presents data from a study of 1,639 child patients. It examined whether the amount of time that clinicians spent in collateral activities could be predicted by demographic variables, child diagnosis, parental psychopathology or family history of mental disorders, or staff variables. For every 60 minutes of direct patient contact, approximately 20 minutes of collateral activities were performed by the clinician. The best predictors of spending time in collateral activities were having parents who were not married, a mother with depression or anxiety, a child patient with a history of substance misuse or abuse, and a child patient with a history of maltreatment.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

The deinstitutionalization of children: An evaluation of the efficacy of wraparound services
Author: Bradley, J. R.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
The development of a scale to evaluate the integrity of wraparound service planning processes in a system of care for youths with serious emotional disturbances
Author: Flam, C. S.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
The Directive Supervision Employee Handbook [Sample]
Author: Patricia Miles
This handbook was written for staff who are employees of agencies implementing the Directive Supervision System. Pat Miles supplied this sample handbook as a supplement to the NWI sponsored webinar, "Strengthening Practice through Directive Supervision," that took place April 13, 2011.
Keywords: human resource, training, coaching, coach, supervision, supervise, tools

The effect of wraparound practice ideology and care coordinator practices on client outcomes
Author: Pagkos, B. M.
Use of the wraparound philosophy in program implementation is widespread across the country, though evidence of linkages between adherence to this philosophy and client outcomes is limited. In Erie County, NY, this philosophy is delivered through care coordination services by care coordinators. This is a study of the effect of adherence to wraparound philosophical elements and components of care coordinator practices on client outcomes ( n = 252). It was found that shorter times of initial care coordination phase completion were associated with higher ratings of wraparound fidelity by caregivers and greater decreases in youth impairment. Higher ratings of adherence to wraparound fidelity by caregivers were found to be associated with a family's objectives being met at discharge. Findings from this study highlight the need to consider both care coordinator practice and adherence to fidelity when attempting to understand the effect of wraparound services on youth.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

The effects of wraparound services on the adjustment of four severely emotionally disturbed youth: A controlled multiple baseline study
Author: Myaard, M. J.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
The Efficacy of the RENEW Model: Individualized School-to-Career Services for Youth At Risk of School Dropout
Author: Malloy, J. M., Sundar, V., Hagner, D., Pierias, L., & Viet, T.
This article describes the results of a research project designed to assess the efficacy of a secondary transition model, RENEW (Rehabilitation, Empowerment, Natural supports, Education and Work), on the social and emotional functioning of 20 youth at risk of dropping out of high school using the Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS) supplemented by a case study to illustrate one student's experience. The study indicates that youth who engaged in the RENEW process had significant improvements in functioning in school and at home, and overall positive gains in several behavioral health domains.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

The Evidence Base and Wraparound
Author: Eric Bruns
resource guide
Keywords: research, evaluation, review

The Evolution of Wraparound Training: Lessons Learned
Author: Constance Conklin
lessons learned over the course of wraparound history
Keywords: human resource, training

The Exploratory Interview
Author: Family Partnership Institute Submitted By: Brad Norman
questions for strengths interview and format for summarizing
Keywords: tool, strength, planning, plan, need, culture

The Family Guide to Building Child & Family Teams - ENGLISH
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Jane Kallal
A guide for building family teams
Keywords: tool, strategy, family, youth, orient, engage, engagement, orientation

The Family Guide to Building Child & Family Teams - SPANISH
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Jane Kallal
A guide for building family teams
Keywords: language, interpretation, family, youth, translate, Spanish, translation, orientation

The Family's Guide to Wraparound Sacramento
Author: Wraparound Sacramento
Overview of the wraparound process, intended for families
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, orient, orientation, family, youth

The Frames of Our Cultural Narratives: How Neurobiology and Metaphorical Frames Inform the Work of Wraparound
Author: Chip Wilder
A compilation of resources collected by the Family Partner Task Force, focused on strengths-based communication.
Keywords: setting, culture, cultural competence

The Full Purpose Partnership Model for Promoting Academic and Socio-Emotional Success in Schools
Author: Anderson, J. A., Houser, J. H. W., & Howland, A.
In 2003, a partnership between a local system of care and a large urban school district led to the creation of a schoolwide educational model called the Full Purpose Partnership (FPP). This model was implemented in several elementary schools in Indianapolis, Indiana to integrate the principles of systems of care and wraparound with the techniques of positive behavioral interventions and supports. The goal of the model is to build school capacity for simultaneously addressing students' educational, health (including mental health), social, and psychological needs. The overall objective is to positively impact school functioning for all students. The application of systems of care to schools and their integration with positive behavioral interventions and supports is relatively new, and thus, the purpose of the evaluation reported in this paper was to increase understanding. Data were collected through interviews and focus groups with members of the various stakeholder groups involved with the FPP. In addition, one member of the evaluation team acted as a participant observer in the FPP schools. Using an emergent case study design, this study focused primarily on the operation of the FPP model vis-a-vis stakeholder perceptions regarding model implementation. Emerging themes included: (1) the role of Care Coordinators in FPP schools; (2) adult "buy-in" and other factors impacting FPP implementation; (3) school climate; and (4) mental health and behavioral impact. Results suggest that the FPP model is positively influencing not only participating schools but the entire school district. (Contains 1 figure and 1 table.)
Keywords: research, study, abstract

The Future of Family Engagement in Residential Care Settings
Author: Affronti, M. L., & Levison-Johnson, J.
Residential programs for children and youth are increasingly implementing engagement strategies to promote family-centered and family-driven models of care (Leichtman, 2008). The practice of engagement is a fairly new area of research, especially in residential care. Prior to implementing a family-centered approach to care, residential administrators and key stakeholders will want to consider the existing knowledge base of evidence-based activities and implementation strategies...Specific recommendations emerged from the synthesis of the literature, and align with current policy and advocacy efforts surrounding family-centered and family-driven care models. It is imperative to note that the dearth of research on family engagement strategies and family-centered models of care does not allow for precise recommendations to be made on individual engagement activities. Broader recommendations are made for service delivery options or program models instead.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

The Impact of Child and Family Team Composition on Wraparound Fidelity: Examining Links Between Team Attendance Consistency and
Author: Eylin Palamaro Munsell, James Cook, Ryan Kilmer, Tanya Vishnevsky, & Melissa Strompolis
This study explored the relationship between CFT member attendance consistency and the fidelity of wraparound team level implementation processes in a System of Care (SOC). Specifically, utilizing Participant Rating Form (PRF) data collected from caregivers, facilitators, youth, supportive persons, and service providers, as well as meeting attendance records, the relationship between team attendance consistency and fidelity of wraparound implementation was explored.
Keywords: accountability, data, fidelity, assessment, measure

The impact of child and family team composition on wraparound fidelity: Examining links between team attendance consistency and functioning
Author: Munsell, E. P., Cook, J. R., Kilmer, R. P., Vishnevsky, T., & Strompolis, M.
Although a growing body of literature has examined wraparound implementation and fidelity, child and family team (CFT) members’ levels of participation and the consistency of their attendance have not been systematically examined. This study explored the relationship between CFT member attendance consistency and the fidelity of wraparound team level implementation processes in a System of Care (SOC). Specifically, utilizing Participant Rating Form (PRF) data collected from caregivers, facilitators, youth, supportive persons, and service providers, as well as meeting attendance records, the relationship between team attendance consistency and fidelity of wraparound implementation was explored. Records for 88 teams, with a total of 2,643 members’ ratings of CFT meetings between 2004 and 2009, were examined. Analyses indicate that the structural team factors of attendance consistency and mean team members present relate to CFT members’ ratings of team functioning and the degree to which meeting processes are consistent with the tenets of wraparound. Team attendance variables related to the views of meeting functioning by facilitators, service providers, and caregivers, the individuals most often responsible for implementation of the plan of care, but not ratings by youth or supportive persons. These findings have implications for policy and the successful implementation of wraparound, underscoring the relevance of attending to and tracking the composition of the CFT and more actively encouraging consistent meeting attendance. Results also highlight the need to measure structural variables that may have salience in fidelity and implementation assessments and, more globally, the effectiveness of SOCs.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

THE IMPACT OF CHILD AND FAMILY TEAM COMPOSITION ON WRAPAROUND FIDELITY: EXAMINING LINKS BETWEEN TEAM ATTENDANCE CONSISTENCY AND FUNCTIONING
Author: Eylin Palamaro Munsell, James R. Cook, Ryan P. Kilmer, Tanya Vishnevsky, & Melissa Strompolis.
Although a growing body of literature has examined wraparound implementation and fidelity, child and family team (CFT) members’ levels of participation and the consistency of their attendance have not been systematically examined. This study explored the relationship between CFT member attendance consistency and the fidelity of wraparound team level implementation processes in a System of Care (SOC). Specifically, utilizing Participant Rating Form (PRF) data collected from caregivers, facilitators, youth, supportive persons, and service providers, as well as meeting attendance records, the relationship between team attendance consistency and fidelity of wraparound implementation was explored. Records for 88 teams, with a total of 2,643 members’ ratings of CFT meetings between 2004 and 2009, were examined. Analyses indicate that the structural team factors of attendance consistency and mean team members present relate to CFT members’ ratings of team functioning and the degree to which meeting processes are consistent with the tenets of wraparound. Team attendance variables related to the views of meeting functioning by facilitators, service providers, and caregivers, the individuals most often responsible for implementation of the plan of care, but not ratings by youth or supportive persons. These findings have implications for policy and the successful implementation of wraparound, underscoring the relevance of attending to and tracking the composition of the CFT and more actively encouraging consistent meeting attendance. Results also highlight the need to measure structural variables that may have salience in fidelity and implementation assessments and, more globally, the effectiveness of SOCs.
Keywords: research, study, full text

The impact of system of care support in adherence to wraparound principles in Child and Family Teams in child welfare in North Carolina
Author: Snyder, E. H., Lawrence, C. N., & Dodge, K. A.
North Carolina is one of a growing number of states to implement family meeting models in child welfare as a way to engage families, while simultaneously addressing complex familial needs and child safety issues. However, much is still unknown regarding how family meetings actually operate in child welfare, underscoring a clear need for further evaluation of this process. Utilizing direct observational data of Child and Family Team (CFT) meetings, collected as part of two separate evaluations of the North Carolina Division of Social Service's Multiple Response System (MRS) and System of Care (SOC) initiatives, the purpose of the current study was to examine whether the support provided by SOC improved fidelity to the CFT model in child welfare. The observations were conducted using the Team Observation Measure consisting of 78 indicators that measure adherence to ten domains associated with high quality family team meetings (e.g., collaborative, individualized, natural supports, outcomes based, strengths-based). Findings indicate that receiving SOC support in child welfare leads to a more collaborative and individualized decision-making process with families. Meeting facilitators in SOC counties were better prepared for CFTs, and had greater ability to lead a more robust and creative brainstorming process to develop a family-driven case plan. The current study also provides a much needed description of the CFT meeting process within child welfare using a direct observational measure.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

THE IMPACT OF SYSTEM OF CARE SUPPORT IN ADHERENCE TO WRAPAROUND PRINCIPLES IN CHILD AND FAMILY TEAMS IN CHILD WELFARE IN NORTH CAROLINA
Author: Snyder, E. H., Lawrence, C. N., & Dodge, K. A.
North Carolina is one of a growing number of states to implement family meeting models in child welfare as a way to engage families, while simultaneously addressing complex familial needs and child safety issues. However, much is still unknown regarding how family meetings actually operate in child welfare, underscoring a clear need for further evaluation of this process. Utilizing direct observational data of Child and Family Team (CFT) meetings, collected as part of two separate evaluations of the North Carolina Division of Social Service”s Multiple Response System (MRS) and System of Care (SOC) initiatives, the purpose of the current study was to examine whether the support provided by SOC improved fidelity to the CFT model in child welfare. The observations were conducted using the Team Observation Measure consisting of 78 indicators that measure adherence to ten domains associated with high quality family team meetings (e.g., collaborative, individualized, natural supports, outcomes based, strengths-based). Findings indicate that receiving SOC support in child welfare leads to a more collaborative and individualized decision-making process with families. Meeting facilitators in SOC counties were better prepared for CFTs, and had greater ability to lead a more robust and creative brainstorming process to develop a family-driven case plan. The current study also provides a much needed description of the CFT meeting process within child welfare using a direct observational measure.
Keywords: research, study, full text

THE IMPLEMENTATION OF WRAPAROUND IN CALIFORNIA’S TITLE IV-E CHILD WELFARE WAIVER DEMONSTRATION PROJECT
Author: Ferguson, C. M.
Understanding the implementation of Wraparound in child welfare is essential to its continued use in the field. The purpose of this study was to understand the implementation of Wraparound in regard to organizational and systems-related factors and contexts. Wraparound was implemented and evaluated in five counties as part of California”s Title IV-E Child Welfare Waiver Demonstration Project, from 1999 to 2004. The three areas of inquiry include the models of Wraparound used, important aspects of the implementation efforts, and the interaction between the principles and values of Wraparound and those of the child welfare system. A multiple case study design provided the structure for data collection and analysis. Focus groups with a convenience sample of administrators and direct-service staff from the public agencies and private community-based agencies implementing Wraparound were conducted annually. While the Wraparound models were similar in configuration there were also unique characteristics that developed in response to local conditions. Issues and solutions emerged regarding referrals and case closures, staffing and training, management information systems, funding, and contextual factors. The values and principles of the child welfare departments, group home providers, and families interacted with the values and principles of Wraparound. The results highlight the importance of organization and systems-level characteristics. Building on the solutions developed in California will help to ensure the sustainability of Wraparound.
Keywords: research, study, full text

The importance of context in fostering responsive community systems: Supports for families in systems of care
Author: Cook, J. R., & Kilmer, R. P.
The importance of helping families of children with severe emotional disturbances (SED) connect with informal or natural supports-that is, individuals who are part of their ongoing communities and daily lives-has been widely recognized. Utilization of informal supports has thus become a core element within systems of care (SOCs) designed to improve services for children with SED and their families. However, research demonstrates that implementation of wraparound, the key practice approach within SOCs, often does not include involvement of informal supports. Using a measure of social connectedness (SC), developed to augment the instruments used for the SOC national evaluation, this study assessed parents' and caregivers' views of their connections to and support from their community within a SOC. Overall, parents and caregivers reported low levels of support across multiple sources as well as a desire for more support. Greater levels of perceived support related positively to caregiver strain, types of and satisfaction with services received, and views of their communities as supportive and safe. Greater attention to families' contexts and the identification of effective ways to connect families to their communities are recommended.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

The Maryland Child and Family Services Interagency Strategic Plan
Author: [MD State Government Officials]
This document outlines Maryland's strategic plan to better serve youth and families in the following domains: Family and Youth Partnership; Interagency Structures; Workforce Development and Training; Information-Sharing; Improving Access to Opportunities and Care; Continuum of Opportunities, Supports, and Care; Financing; Education
Keywords: vision, mission, strategy, plan, MOU, information, share, legislation, law, policy, laws, policies

The Nashville Connection: Family Guide to Wraparound
Author: Tennessee Voices for Children
Overview of the wraparound process, intended for families
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, orient, orientation, family, youth

The National Wraparound Initiative: A Community of Practice Approach to Building Knowledge in the Field of Children's Mental H
Author: Janet Walker, Eric Bruns, Lisa Conlan, & Carol LaForce
One of the most significant recent trends in the field of children's mental health has been the shift in the conceptualization of authority and expertise. Increasingly, there are demands to recognize and to respond to the perspectives of people who have traditionally been seen more as passive targets of interventions and other change efforts. This has led to a variety of efforts to blend perspectives and/or build partnerships between consumers and providers or between researchers and practitioners. This article explores how a commitment to blending perspectives as a way of providing children's mental health services was a central factor in the emergence of wraparound, a widely implemented care-planning approach for children with complex needs and their families. The commitment to blending perspectives is also a central organizing principle of the collaborative work of a community of practice called the National Wraparound Initiative (NWI), which has worked to support wraparound and to generate knowledge about wraparound practice and implementation. The article goes on to describe some of the benefits, challenges, and tensions that have emerged in the work of the community of practice and to consider what the experience of the NWI may have to offer to others engaged in similar efforts.
Keywords: NWI, National Wraparound Initiative, research, full text

The National Wraparound Initiative: A Community of Practice Approach to Building Knowledge in the Field of Children's Mental H
Author: Janet Walker, Eric Bruns, Lisa Conlan, & Carol LaForce
This article explores how a commitment to blending perspectives as a way of providing children’s mental health services was a central factor in the emergence of wraparound, a widely implemented care-planning approach for children with complex needs and their families. The commitment to blending perspectives is also a central organizing principle of the collaborative work of a community of practice called the National Wraparound Initiative (NWI), which has worked to support wraparound and to generate knowledge about wraparound practice and implementation. The article goes on to describe some of the benefits, challenges, and tensions that have emerged in the work of the community of practice and to consider what the experience of the NWI may have to offer to others engaged in similar efforts.
Keywords: history

The National Wraparound Initiative: A community of practice approach to building knowledge in the field of children's mental health
Author: Walker, J. S., Bruns, E. J., Conlan, L., & LaForce, C.
One of the most significant recent trends in the field of children's mental health has been the shift in the conceptualization of authority and expertise. Increasingly, there are demands to recognize-and to respond to-the perspectives of people who have traditionally been seen more as passive targets of interventions and other change efforts. This has led to a variety of efforts to blend perspectives and/or build partnerships between consumers and providers or between researchers and practitioners. This article explores how a commitment to blending perspectives as a way of providing children's mental health services was a central factor in the emergence of wraparound, a widely implemented care-planning approach for children with complex needs and their families. The commitment to blending perspectives is also a central organizing principle of the collaborative work of a community of practice called the National Wraparound Initiative (NWI), which has worked to support wraparound and to generate knowledge about wraparound practice and implementation. The article goes on to describe some of the benefits, challenges, and tensions that have emerged in the work of the community of practice and to consider what the experience of the NWI may have to offer to others engaged in similar efforts.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

The Phases of Wraparound: Real Life & Teams
Author: Matt Pierce
tells of personal experiences in the phases of wraparound
Keywords: process, description, practice, practice model

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FAMILY EDUCATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES AND PARENT AND CHILD OUTCOMES OVER TIME
Author: Kutash, K., Garraza, L. G., Ferron, J. M., Duchnowski, A. J., Walrath, C., & Green, A. L.
The purpose of the current study is to contribute to the knowledge base on the use of family education and support (FES) services by examining the longitudinal trajectories of FES receipt and multiple domains of child and family functioning. Using an extant data set of more than 9,000 youth and their caregivers, results indicate that families who received FES on entry into services had greater caregiver strain, and their children experienced greater emotional challenges than families who did not receive FES services. Furthermore, for families who received FES, the longitudinal results revealed an immediate effect of seeking additional services, decreasing caregiver strain 6 months after receipt of FES services, and improving child emotional functioning 6 to 18 months after initial receipt of FES services. The complex, lagged effects in the results are discussed in the context of the theorized cyclical course of family stress as exemplified by the Double ABCX model of adjustment and adaptation. Implications for future research of FES services are discussed, especially the need to develop a functional logic model and an operational definition of FES and its components.
Keywords: research, study, full text

The RENEW model of futures planning, resource development, and school-to-career experiences for youth with emotional or behavioral disorders
Author: Malloy, J. M., Drake, J., Abate, K., & Cormier, G. M.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
The role of empathy in the Wraparound Model
Author: Morrison-Velasco, S.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
The role of fidelity and feedback in the wraparound approach
Author: Ogles, B. M., Carlston, D., Hatfield, D., Melendez, G., Dowell, K., & Fields, S. A.
Wraparound approaches are being implemented with children in many mental health systems around the country. Evidence for the effectiveness of the wraparound approach, however, is limited. In addition, the degree to which wraparound interventions adhere to the principles of wraparound has rarely been assessed. We examined the influence of adherence to wraparound principles and outcome feedback within the wraparound approach. Children participating in family team meetings were enrolled in a feedback or no feedback condition. Teams receiving feedback were given a brief report regarding outcome progress four times over a three-month period. In addition, adherence to wraparound principles was assessed in the initial team meeting and examined in relationship to outcome at three months and nine months. Although youth in both feedback and non-feedback groups improved with intervention, there were few differences between the groups based on outcome feedback. Similarly, adherence was uniformly high and did not influence the outcome for individual cases. Although the wraparound approach was helpful for youth in our sample, outcome feedback and adherence to wraparound principles had limited influence on these effects.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

The role of individualized care in a service delivery system for children and adolescents with severely maladjusted behavior
Author: Burchard, J. D., & Clarke, R. T.
Individualized care is a total system of care that is tailored to a child with severely maladjusted behavior. The services are unconditional, flexible, child and family focused, and interagency coordinated. The services follow the child until the child is adjusting in a normalized, mainstream environment. Individualized care is illustrated through two different projects. One is the Alaska Youth Initiative where individualized care was used to return children from out-of-state, residential programs. The other is Project Wraparound where it was used to prevent children from being removed from their families. This paper begins with the principles of individualized care and then describes the ecological, multilevel assessment process that coincides with the delivery of services. A case example from Project Wraparound is provided for clarification. Following the case example is a discussion of the need for evaluation data with some suggested strategies for documenting effectiveness. The final section focuses on two barriers to the implementation of individualized care. One is the tendency to think in terms of component programs rather than individualized services. The other barrier is the competition for scarce resources. Strategies are presented for overcoming both barriers.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

The Role of the Clinician Employed in a Wraparound Program
Author: Debra Manners
Defining the role of the Wraparound Clinician
Keywords: human resource, role, youth partner

The Sacred Child Project: A New Definition of "Formal" Services
Author: Eagle, J., Painte, D., Paulson, S., & Young Bird, M.
Reviews the Sacred Child Project in North Dakota, a tribally developed version of the wraparound process. The effort combines contemporary human services with the spiritual and cultural wisdom of the tribes. The article is based on an interview and conversation between the authors and John VanDenBerg, a wraparound consultant.
Keywords: ressearch, study, abstract

The Wraparound Approach for Students With Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Opportunities for School Psychologists
Author: Quinn, K. P., & Lee, V.
Students with significant emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) present school personnel with complex challenges. For those students who present especially pervasive and chronic challenges, the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) has recommended comprehensive assessments and interventions that empower families and involve close collaboration with community-based service providers. In recent years, wraparound has emerged as one approach to collaboratively developing interventions that are both family focused and ecologically comprehensive. As such, the approach is consonant with the mental health roles widely advocated for school psychologists in the professional literature. In this article, we provide a brief overview of the need for the wraparound approach and its theoretical foundations. We then detail the principles on which the approach is grounded and the specific procedures through which it comes to fruition. Finally, we discuss implications of the approach for school psychologists.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

The wraparound approach in systems of care
Author: Winters, N. C., & Metz, W. P.
Child and adolescent psychiatrists and general psychiatrists who serve children and adolescents with complex mental health needs, generally find themselves interfacing with multiple child-serving systems, including mental health, child welfare, juvenile justice, developmental disabilities, addictions services, and primary health care. In these systems of care, psychiatrists will likely encounter the term “wraparound,” which describes a key intervention ushered in with the system-of-care model of service delivery. This article describes the wraparound approach, which has been at the forefront of mental health service delivery for children and youth with serious emotional disturbance since the mid-1980s. Wraparound is an empirically supported, family-driven, strengths-based planning approach that provides individualized care using an array of formal services and natural supports.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

The Wraparound Orange County Model
Author: Denise Churchill
wraparound model for Orange County
Keywords: finance, sustainability, local, model

The Wraparound Process User's Guide: A Handbook for Families
Author: Patricia Miles, Eric Bruns, Trina Osher & Janet Walker Submitted By: Janet Walker
Overview of the wraparound process designed for families--reflects the National Wraparound Initiative's definition of the wraparound process
Keywords: tool, strategy, family, youth, orient, engage, engagement, orientation

The Wraparound Process: An Overview of Implementation Essentials
Author: Eric Bruns & Janet Walker
overview of the basic principles of wraparound implementations
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development

The wraparound process: Individualized, community-based care for children and adolescents with intensive needs
Author: Walker, J. S., & Bruns, E. J.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
THEORY MEETS PRACTICE: THE LOCALIZATION OF WRAPAROUND SERVICES FOR YOUTH WITH SERIOUS EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE
Author: Mendenhall, A. N., Kapp, S. A., Rand, A., Robbins, M. L., & Stipp, K.
Using Kansas as an example, this study demonstrates the difficulties of implementing high fidelity wraparound on a large scale. It addresses these challenges by recommending a balance of standardized wraparound practices, localized innovations, and agency compliance with Medicaid.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Tier 3 case example: Wraparound
Author: Eber, L., Lindsey, B., & White, M.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Tips for Your Team Meetings: A Guide for Youth
Author: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures
This tip sheet offers suggestions and strategies to help young people become more involved in their team meetings.
Keywords: youth partner, role, training, coaching

Tracking Behavioral Progress within a Children's Mental Health System: The Vermont Community Adjustment Tracking System
Author: Bruns, E. J., Burchard, J. D., Froelich, P., Yoe, J. T., & Tighe, T.
Describes the Vermont Community Adjustment Tracking System (VT-CATS), a data collection system designed to track behavioral adjustment within children's mental health system. Behavioral adjustment as an outcome variable for children's mental health; Characteristics and properties of the indicators checklists of VT-CATS; Development and evaluation of VT-CATS.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Training, Coaching and Beyond: Building Capacity in Your Wraparound Workforce
Author: Patricia Miles
supporting wraparound implementation
Keywords: human resource, training

Training, Coaching, and Supervision for Wraparound Facilitators: Guidelines from the National Wraparound Initiative
Author: Walker, J., Bertram, R., Embree, D., Lua, M., Berger Lucas, L., Vermillion, J., Martone, M., Meyer, C., Sandoval, J., & members
This document addresses three phases in the professional development of wraparound facilitators, taking facilitators from orientation to competence.
Keywords: facilitator, care coordinator, role, training, coaching, coach, supervision, supervise, tools

Transition Plan [sample]
Author: Ohana Coaching Submitted By: Laura Burger Lucas
plan sample
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition

Treatment Strategies for Juvenile Delinquency: Alternative Solutions
Author: Flash, K.
Social workers involved in the treatment of adjudicated youth commonly encounter youth sentenced to traditional incarceration or parole as a path to rehabilitation. This article examines alternative treatment strategies for adjudicated youth, namely Victim Offender Reconciliation Programs (often called mediation), Boot Camps, and Wrap-Around Community-Based Care, to help these youth avoid reoffending. While popular with the media, policymakers, or the general public, an evaluation of the literature makes it clear that these programs do not necessarily guarantee lower recidivism rates for program participants. It is evident that further research and evaluation must be done in order to more fully understand the drawbacks and benefits of alternative strategies, and to more appropriately help adjudicated youth and their communities.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Unconditional Schools, Youth of Promise
Author: Lloyd, D.
This article contrasts schools of exclusion with unconditional schools, which are designed to wrap around services to meet the needs of even high-risk students. The author describes essential components of developing a teamwork approach to increase the holding power of schools with challenging students.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Using a Theory of Change to Drive Human Resource Development for Wraparound
Author: Janet Walker & Marlene Matarese
Training, coaching and staff evaluation efforts within wraparound programs have typically been linked only very loosely to theory. The authors argue that wraparound's unique history allowed it to evolve with limited theoretical grounding, and then describe a theory of change for wraparound, focusing on the major causal routes that are hypothesized to lead to outcomes.
Keywords: principle, theory, logic model

Using a theory of change to drive human resource development for wraparound
Author: Walker, J. S., & Matarese, M.
Achieving coherence and integration across staff professional development activities is facilitated when training, coaching and staff evaluation are guided by a clearly articulated program theory or "theory of change" that describes how skillful practice promotes desired outcomes. We focus on a theory of change for wraparound, a widely implemented approach to providing community-based care for children with high levels of mental health and related needs. Training, coaching and staff evaluation efforts within wraparound programs have typically been linked only very loosely to theory. We argue that wraparound's unique history allowed it to evolve with limited theoretical grounding, and we then describe a theory of change for wraparound, focusing on the major causal routes that are hypothesized to lead to outcomes. Finally, we provide an extended illustration of how the theory can provide the basis for a coherent and integrated approach to developing the skills and capacities of staff members playing key roles in wraparound implementation.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

USING A THEORY OF CHANGE TO DRIVE HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT FOR WRAPAROUND
Author: Janet S. Walker & Marlene Matarese.
Achieving coherence and integration across staff professional development activities is facilitated when training, coaching and staff evaluation are guided by a clearly articulated program theory or “theory of change” that describes how skillful practice promotes desired outcomes. We focus on a theory of change for wraparound, a widely implemented approach to providing community-based care for children with high levels of mental health and related needs. Training, coaching and staff evaluation efforts within wraparound programs have typically been linked only very loosely to theory. We argue that wraparound’s unique history allowed it to evolve with limited theoretical grounding, and we then describe a theory of change for wraparound, focusing on the major causal routes that are hypothesized to lead to outcomes. Finally, we provide an extended illustration of how the theory can provide the basis for a coherent and integrated approach to developing the skills and capacities of staff members playing key roles in wraparound implementation.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Using best practices can ease the way for keeping youth engaged in Wraparound
Author: Janet Walker
This article, originally published in the TA Telescope (January, 2015), highlights research-based best practices for keeping young people engaged in the Wraparound process.
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, tool, tools

Using Evaluation to Implement Wraparound and Sustain Fidelity, Part 1: Fidelity Tools and Resources of the National Wraparound I
Author: Eric Bruns & Janet Walker
tools and resources of evaluation
Keywords: accountability, data, fidelity, assessment, measure

Using Evaluation to Implement Wraparound and Sustain Fidelity, Part 2: Strengthening Wraparound with System Development and Yout
Author: Eric Bruns, Janet Walker, Nikkia Gulley & Marcos Pacheco
Keywords: accountability, data, fidelity, assessment, measure

Using Latent Growth Curve Modeling to Examine Changes in Mental Health Outcomes for Children Enrolled in a System of Care
Author: Vishnevsky, T., Strompolis, M., Reeve, C. L., Kilmer, R. P., & Cook, J. R.
MeckCARES, a system of care (SOC) in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, is designed to serve youth with severe emotional disturbances and their families. This study employed latent growth curve (LGC) modeling to examine (a) the degree to which youth improved on indicators of adjustment over the course of the first year of enrollment in MeckCARES, and (b) the services or demographic variables associated with individual differences in the rate of change over time. Participant caregivers (N = 121) reported on 3 major indicators of youth adjustment at baseline, 6-month follow-up, and 12-month follow-up. Primary analyses indicated that there was a modest yet significant improvement in all 3 outcome measures over the first year of enrollment in MeckCARES. Additional analyses revealed that caregiver reports of receiving case management at any point in the first year were associated with improvement in behavioral and emotional strengths as well as a reduction in psychological and behavioral symptoms. No significant differences in rate of change were observed based on caregiver-reported receipt of individual or family therapy nor any demographic variables. These findings suggest that MeckCARES may be particularly effective when youth are receiving case management services. Additional implications for practice are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Using Medicaid Waivers to Finance Home and Community-Based Services
Author: Connie Conklin
webinar about service funding
Keywords: finance, sustainability, state, model

Using Systems of Care to Reduce Incarceration of Youth with Serious Mental Illness
Author: Erickson, C. D.
Youth with serious mental illness come into contact with juvenile justice more than 3 times as often as other youth, obliging communities to expend substantial resources on adjudicating and incarcerating many who, with proper treatment, could remain in the community for a fraction of the cost. Incarceration is relatively ineffective at remediating behaviors associated with untreated serious mental illness and may worsen some youths' symptoms and long-term prognoses. Systems of care represent a useful model for creating systems change to reduce incarceration of these youth. This paper identifies the systemic factors that contribute to the inappropriate incarceration of youth with serious mental illness, including those who have committed non-violent offenses or were detained due to lack of available treatment. It describes the progress of on-going efforts to address this problem including wraparound and diversion programs and others utilizing elements of systems of care. The utility of systems of care principles for increasing access to community-based mental health care for youth with serious mental illness is illustrated and a number of recommendations for developing collaborations with juvenile justice to further reduce the inappropriate incarceration of these youth are offered.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

USING SYSTEMS OF CARE TO REDUCE INCARCERATION OF YOUTH WITH SERIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS
Author: Erickson, C.
Youth with serious mental illness come into contact with juvenile justice more than 3 times as often as other youth, obliging communities to expend substantial resources on adjudicating and incarcerating many who, with proper treatment, could remain in the community for a fraction of the cost. Incarceration is relatively ineffective at remediating behaviors associated with untreated serious mental illness and may worsen some youths’ symptoms and long-term prognoses. Systems of care represent a useful model for creating systems change to reduce incarceration of these youth. This paper identifies the systemic factors that contribute to the inappropriate incarceration of youth with serious mental illness, including those who have committed non-violent offenses or were detained due to lack of available treatment. It describes the progress of on-going efforts to address this problem including wraparound and diversion programs and others utilizing elements of systems of care. The utility of systems of care principles for increasing access to community-based mental health care for youth with serious mental illness is illustrated and a number of recommendations for developing collaborations with juvenile justice to further reduce the inappropriate incarceration of these youth are offered.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Using the EMQ Connectedness Model
Author: Family Partnership Institute Submitted By: Brad Norman
tool for eliciting and visualizing social connections and supports, sample product
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, implement, indicators, culture

Using Wraparound to Support Students with Developmental Disabilities in Higher Education
Author: Lechtenberger, D., Barnard-Brak, L., Sokolosky, S., & McCrary, D.
The wraparound planning process developed for a young adult with significant physical and developmental disabilities described in this article validates the importance of collaboration between service providers, academic advisors, faculty, and staff in institutions of higher education to support students with disabilities to successfully complete their postsecondary education goals. This case study provides guidance for staff, faculty, and adult disability service providers as they plan for how to best support students with disabilities who have multiple needs that must be addressed in a meaningful way for them to be successful in higher education. (Contains 2 tables.)
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Vocational and Transition Interventions for Adolescents and Young Adults with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders
Author: Bullis, M., & Cheney, D.
This article describes characteristics of adolescents with emotional and behavioral disorders, transition outcomes for these students, model transition programs, and key transition service delivery components, including: intake and functional skill assessment, personal future planning, wraparound social services, competitive employment, flexible educational experiences, social skill training, and long-term support.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

WHAT FAMILY SUPPORT SPECIALISTS DO: EXAMINING SERVICE DELIVERY
Author: Wisdom, J., Lewandowski, E., Pollock, M., Arci, M., Shorter, P., Olin, S., Armusewicz, K., Horwitz, S., & Hoagwood, K.
This study describes services provided by family support specialists (FSS), peer advocates in programs for children with serious psychiatric conditions, to delineate differences between recommended components of FSS services and services actually provided. An analysis of qualitative interview and observational data and quantitative survey data from 63 staff at 21 mental health programs in New York identified that FSS and other staff have generally similar ideas about FSS services, and that these perceptions of activities are generally congruent with what FSS actually did. Implications of findings are discussed in the context of developing competencies and quality indicators for FSS.
Keywords: research, study, full text

What is a Youth Coordinator and What Do They Do?
Author: Tammy Cherry
information on youth coordinators
Keywords: human resource, role, youth partner

What works in wraparound programming
Author: Skiba, R. J., & Nichols, S. D.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
When schools fail: Alternative therapeutic and educational settings for youths with severe emotional and behavioral challenges
Author: Foster, J.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
When There Is No Blueprint: The Provision of Mental Health Services in Alternative School Programs for Suspended and Expelled Youth
Author: Goldenson, J.
A variety of alternative programs are being implemented in Canada and the United States for students who have exhibited conduct problems and who are suspended or expelled from their schools. Given the complexity of issues that these students frequently face, treatment must be multifaceted, wrap-around, delivered by trained professionals and be targeted to these students' unique biopsychosocial needs. This article reviews the literature on delivery of mental health services within the broader school-based context. Specific mental health issues endemic in the high-risk adolescent demographic are highlighted, and implications for mental health professionals, particularly psychologists, working with such individuals are discussed. Suggestions are made with respect to screening and assessment instruments and treatment.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Which client and treatment variables influence the efficacy of wraparound services?
Author: Cope, J. M.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Who Administers Wraparound? An Examination of the Training, Beliefs, and Implementation Supports for Wraparound Providers
Author: Bruns, E. J. W. C. M. S. A. K.
The wraparound care management process has been cited as a promising means for making evidence-based treatments relevant and accessible to youth with mental health needs and their families. However, there has been little research on the background and training of providers who participate on wraparound teams. In the current study, the authors examined the prevalence of wraparound implementation nationally in systems of care and the background, training, organizational supports, and perceptions of evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for professionals who implement wraparound. Results suggest that wraparound implementation is common across communities and that wraparound providers are different from other professionals. They are, for example, less likely to have an advanced degree, more likely to have received their training from agency inservices, less likely to receive manuals with their training, and more likely to report fully implementing treatment protocols. Wraparound providers are also more likely to report that their agency or organization mandated implementation of EBTs. Results provide several implications for wraparound model specification, development of quality assurance supports, and a need for higher education to better orient trainees to models and philosophies such as wraparound.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Why Cultural Competence is One of Wraparound's Greatest Strengths and Most Persistent Challenges
Author: Katherine Lazear
This article, originally published in the TA Telescope (January, 2015), addresses the need for culturally competent Wraparound in working with diverse communities. It highlights exemplar interventions and links to additional resources for further reading.
Keywords: tool, strategy, culture, cultural competence

Wisconsin: Braided Funding Model Supported by State Statute Changes
Author: Bruce Kamradt
funding model
Keywords: finance, sustainability, state, model

Words Mean Things Pre/Posttest
Author: [not available]
A compilation of resources collected by the Family Partner Task Force, focused on strengths-based communication.
Keywords: principle, theory, tool

Words Mean Things: A California County Trains Child Welfare Workers to Use More Strength-Based Language
Author: Amy Rogers & Joan Miller
A compilation of resources collected by the Family Partner Task Force, focused on strengths-based communication.
Keywords: principle, theory, coaching, coach, supervision, supervise

Wrap-around services: an analysis of community-based mental health services for children
Author: Furman, R., & Jackson, R.
TOPIC: Wrap-around services-individualized, community-based mental health services for children in their homes and schools-for children with severe emotional and behavioral disorders. PURPOSE: To conduct an analysis of the social policy antecedents that culminated in wrap-around services in one state and consider the development of one state's implementation and relevant value issues. SOURCES: Policy and historical literature; the first author's experience as a director of a large wrap-around program. CONCLUSIONS: While the advent of wrap-around services and the expansion of Medicaid represent significant steps forward in the treatment of children with mental health problems, outcome studies of these services are sorely needed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Wraparound and positive behavioral interventions and supports in the schools
Author: Eber, L., Sugai, G., Smith, C. R., & Scott, T. M.
Effective school-based programming for students with behavioral difficulties continues to challenge educators. Consensus is growing that prevention and early intervention must be prioritized, agencies must collaborate, and family—school partnerships must be improved so that effective interventions are actually implemented. This article explores how the school-based wraparound approach and a school-wide systems approach to positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) work together to create more effective school environments and improved outcomes for students with or at risk of behavioral challenges. Complementary aspects of these wraparound and PBIS approaches are described, and future directions for research and practice are explored.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Wraparound and the Child Welfare Context
Author: [various]
A compilation of resources relating to the NWI sponsored webinar, "The Art of Wraparound in the Child Welfare Environment," that took place January 25, 2011.
Keywords: setting, child welfare

Wraparound care
Author: Grundle, T. J.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Wraparound care in Vermont: Program development, implementation, and evaluation of a statewide system of individualized services
Author: Yoe, J. T., Santarcangelo, S., Atkins, M., & Burchard, J. D.
Over the past decade, there has been a dramatic shift in the provision of mental health services to children, adolescents, and their families. This shift has been marked by a movement away from restrictive treatment options toward the development of comprehensive community-based systems of care designed to keep the most challenging children in their homes, schools, and communities. Based on a model of intensive case management referred to as Wraparound Care, Vermont's statewide approach emphasizes aggressive outreach, use of the least restrictive treatment options, and care that is flexible, unconditional, and child- and family-centered. We chart the development of Vermont's Wraparound Care Initiative and present residential, educational, and behavioral outcome data for a cohort of 40 youth receiving Wraparound Care over a 12-month period. The results showed that after 12-months, youth who had been previously removed from their homes or were at imminent risk of such removal, were residing in significantly less restrictive community-based living arrangements and exhibiting significantly fewer problem behaviors than at intake. These results are discussed in light of recent national studies and previous studies on similar cohorts of Vermont youth receiving Wraparound Care.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Wraparound Counseling: An Ecosystemic Approach to Working with Economically Disadvantaged Students in Urban School Settings
Author: West-Olatunji, C., Frazier, K. N., & Kelley, E.
Urban schools are faced with challenges such as low academic performance, increased incidents of violence, lack of parental engagement with educators, and school personnel burnout. Wraparound counseling is a holistic prevention tool that combines the best practices of counseling and special education for use in the school setting.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Wraparound Fidelity Assessment System Document Review Measure
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Wraparound Evaluation and Resear
WFAS Document Review - October 2007
Keywords: accountability, data, fidelity, assessment, measure

Wraparound Fidelity Assessment Team Observation Measure
Author: [not available] Submitted By: WERT
WFAS - Team Observation Measure, October 2007
Keywords: accountability, data, fidelity, assessment, measure

Wraparound Fidelity Index
Author: [not available] Submitted By: WERT
WFI-4 demographics form, March 2008
Keywords: accountability, data, fidelity, assessment, measure

Wraparound Fidelity Index 4 - Caregiver Form (Spanish)
Author: Wraparound Evaluation and Research Team & Eric Bruns
WFI-4, caregiver form, Spanish translation
Keywords: language, interpretation, Spanish, translation, translate

Wraparound Implementation Guide: A Handbook for Administrators and Managers
Author: Patricia Miles, Neil Brown, & The National Wraparound Initiative Implementation Work Group
implementation guide
Keywords: implementation, standards, system, development

Wraparound is Worth Doing Well: An Evidence-Based Statement
Author: Bruns, Eric
This article examines some recent research on outcomes from poorly-implemented Wraparound services and provides evidence that Wraparound has the best chance of succeeding when it is implemented with fidelity.
Keywords: research, evaluation, implementation, standards

Wraparound Maine Summary: Mental Health Service Use and Cost Study
Author: Office of Continuous Quality Improvement
This snapshot highlights the results of a mental health service use and cost study on children and youth enrolled in Wraparound Maine. Results of the study from the Office of Continuous Quality Improvement Services indicate a 28% reduction in overall average per-child mental health expenditures following the initiation of wraparound and significant expenditure reductions in several service areas.
Keywords: research, evaluation, study, model, report, snapshot, costs, finance, finances, cost, analysis, expenditure, expenditures, study, research

Wraparound Milwaukee Plan of Care
Author: Wraparound Milwaukee Submitted By: Mary Jo Meyers
plan of care form with some example sections filled in
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, implement, indicators, progress, track, goal

Wraparound Milwaukee: A Local Model of Blended Funding
Author: Bruce Kamradt
funding model
Keywords: finance, sustainability, local, model

Wraparound Milwaukee: Aiding Youth with Mental Health Needs
Author: Kamradt, B.
Finding effective treatment models for youth in the juvenile justice system with serious emotional, mental health, and behavioral needs can be difficult. The traditional categorical approach that the juvenile justice, child welfare, and mental health systems often use places youth in a "one-size-fits-all" program, regardless of the youth's needs. Wraparound Milwaukee takes a quite different approach. This approach, which is based on the Wraparound philosophy, offers care that is tailored to each youth. The following elements of the Wraparound approach have been found to be of particular importance when working with children in the juvenile justice system: a strength-based approach to children and families; family involvement in the treatment process; needs-based service planning and delivery; individualized service plans; and an outcome-focused approach. This program, which began in 1994, is made up of the following components: care coordination; the Child and Family Team; a mobile crisis team; and a provider network. Because Wraparound Milwaukee blends system funds, it can provide a flexible and comprehensive array of services to delinquent youth and their families. While this program offers many formal services, informal services that the care coordinator and Child and Family Team identify through strengths assessment are often even more effective. Outcomes for youth participating in Wraparound Milwaukee have been encouraging. Data indicate that the program is achieving positive outcomes. The challenges and the future of this program are briefly discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Wraparound NOT the Runaround: Using a Theory Based Wraparound Practice Model to Ensure Quality Practice for Families (Parts 1 an
Author: Marlene Matarese, Janet Walker, & Eric Bruns
wraparound practice model
Keywords: principle, theory, logic model

Wraparound or individualised models of care: Do they fit into Australian child welfare?
Author: Ainsworth, F.
In Australia there is some interest in wraparound or individualised models of care as an alternative to traditional modes of child welfare funding and service delivery. This article points to the origin and core principles that guide attempts to create this post-institutional pattern of service. Following this a definition of wraparound or individualised services is offered. The current state of US research into the effectiveness of services provided under this rubric is then reported. Finally, comment is offered about the relevance of wraparound and individualised forms of service for Australian child welfare.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Wraparound Oregon Brochure Text (Spanish)
Author: Wraparound Oregon
wraparound brochure
Keywords: language, interpretation, Spanish, translation, translate

Wraparound Oregon Early Childhood Description of Practice
Author: Wraparound Oregon Early Childhood Service Team
description of practice
Keywords: process, description

Wraparound Oregon Evaluation Brochure (Spanish)
Author: Wraparound Oregon
evaluation brochure
Keywords: language, interpretation, Spanish, translation, translate

Wraparound Oregon Flyer (Spanish)
Author: Wraparound Oregon
Keywords: language, interpretation, Spanish, translation, translate

Wraparound Oregon Information Management System
Author: Wraparound Oregon & ChristieCare
Keywords: accountability, data, data system, system

Wraparound Oregon Interagency Agreement
Author: [Various]
This document outlines an agreement between the state of Oregon and various child-serving agencies regarding joint cooperation in improving services for children and families.
Keywords: vision, mission, strategy, plan, MOU, information, share, legislation, law, policy, laws, policies

Wraparound Oregon Plan of Care
Author: Wraparound Oregon Submitted By: Janet Walker
partially filled sample plan of care
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, action, step, need, outcome, goal

Wraparound Oregon Strengths/Needs Summary
Author: Wraparound Oregon Submitted By: Janet Walker
example of filled-out strengths and needs summary
Keywords: tool, priority, planning, plan, culture, prioritize, outcome, goal

Wraparound Oregon System Reform Guidebook
Author: Alice Galloway Submitted By: Wraparound Oregon
Wraparound Oregon has created a guidebook to help other communities raise needed resources, navigate bureaucratic systems, and launch change initiatives that will ultimately transform the way the public sector responds to populations in need. This guidebook can be used as a guide for system of care implementation, a replication framework for the wraparound process, a cookbook for system reform and system change, or a process for community engagement.
Keywords: finance, sustainability, local, model, legal, law

Wraparound Outcome Scale
Author: [not available] Submitted By: Connie Conklin
a form for recording, visualizing, and tracking outcomes
Keywords: tool, strategy, transition, plan, implement, indicators, progress, track, goal

Wraparound Plan of Care
Author: Connections Submitted By: Mollie Janssen
Form for a plan of care
Keywords: tool, need, planning, plan, implement, indicators, outcome, goal

Wraparound Practice
Author: Mary Jo Meyers, Marlene Matarese, & Kimberly Estep
information on the how and why of implementing a team-based wraparound model
Keywords: process, description

Wraparound Practice: Poll
Author: [poll from webinar by Mary Jo Meyers, Marlene Matarese, & Kimberly Estep]
Keywords: process, description

Wraparound retrospective: Factors predicting positive outcomes
Author: Cox, K., Baker, D., & Wong, M. A.
While research regarding the effectiveness of the wraparound process is steadily mounting, little is known about how this service delivery model works and for whom. Using data gathered on 176 youth who participated in the wraparound process, the authors examine client and service factors associated with outcomes. Bivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the likelihood of treatment success based on select child and service characteristics. Results reveal that youth who exhibited lower levels of impairment at service entry were most successful in transitioning to and preserving a home placement, while those who possessed higher numbers of collateral supports were more likely to attain treatment goals. Findings also underscore the value of a planning process that promotes youth and family involvement in community activities. High adherence to this element of practice was found to predict both goal attainment and youth success in transitioning to a home setting. Implications for the implementation of the wraparound process with youth who are in residential care or at risk of out-of-home placement are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Wraparound services
Author: Burchard, J. D., Atkins, M., & Burchard, S. N.
In this chapter, we describe and illustrate a process for serving people with emotional and behavioral problems that is referred to as wraparound services. Although wraparound services have been used with people experiencing all levels of emotional and behavioral problems, the approach was developed as a community-based alternative to residential treatment (Burchard, Burchard, Sewell, & VanDenBerg, 1993; Burchard & Clarke, 1990; Burchard & Schaefer, 1992; Clarke, Burchard, Schaefer, & Welkowitz, 1992; VanDenBerg, 1993). After describing the principles that are involved in the administration of wraparound services, we present a case to illustrate the use of this approach with a child who was given a dual diagnosis of mental retardation and severe emotional disturbance.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Wraparound Services
Author: Stevenson, R. A.
Nontraditional, pro-active and cost-effective approaches exist within school districts to creatively meet the behavioral, academic and transitional needs of students with disabilities. What I and others term “wraparound service delivery” is a community-based solution for meeting the needs of behaviorally challenged students who are at risk of being placed outside the community in residential or foster home settings. The goal is to turn what resources we have into what the student needs. Resources are created and organized around the student, family and teacher. This collaborative process focuses on identifying the strengths of the student and his or her family and extended family. These strengths are used as the basis of the wraparound plan. Rather than sending the student to a placement away from his or her family and community, community-based services are wrapped around the student. The ultimate goal of wraparound is to turn our most frustrating challenges into our greatest successes.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Wraparound services for at-risk youths in rural schools
Author: Maynard-Moody, C.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Wraparound Services for Homeless TANF Families Recovering from Substance Abuse
Author: Downes, D., & Austin, M. J.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Wraparound Services for Young Schoolchildren with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders
Author: Duckworth, S., Smith-Rex, S., Okey, S., Brookshire, M., Rawlinson, D., Rawlinson, R., Castillo, S., Little, J.
Describes a project designed to meet the needs of young elementary schoolchildren with severe and complex emotional and behavioral disorders. Role of the teacher as creator of cultural competence; Role of the behavioral support team. INSETS: Systems Theory and a Wraparound System.;'The Therapeutic Day'.;Who Says My Child Has Behavior Problems in School?;10 Tips for Teachers.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Wraparound services: Children and families
Author: Erdman, P.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Wraparound Services: Infusion into Secondary Schools as a Dropout Prevention Strategy
Author: Fries, D., Carney, K. J., Blackman-Urteaga, L., & Savas, S. A.
For more than 20 years, the efficacy of using the wraparound approach to support high-risk youth has been examined in educational and community settings. Few studies show the value of wraparound service from either a school- or community-based agency as a dropout prevention strategy. Findings from a federal research grant project suggest that many high-risk teens reconnect with educational goals once their lives become more stable after receiving wraparound support. A discussion of the barriers that prevent the most needy school-age youth from accessing wraparound service is offered, with suggestions for how school personnel can increase high school graduation rates for their students with the highest needs.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

WRAPAROUND SERVICES: INFUSION INTO SECONDARY SCHOOLS AS A DROPOUT PREVENTION STRATEGY
Author: Fries, D., Carney, K. J., Blackman-Urteaga, L., & Savas, S. A.
For more than 20 years, the efficacy of using the wraparound approach to support high-risk youth has been examined in educational and community settings. Few studies show the value of wraparound service from either a school- or community-based agency as a dropout prevention strategy. Findings from a federal research grant project suggest that many high-risk teens reconnect with educational goals once their lives become more stable after receiving wraparound support. A discussion of the barriers that prevent the most needy school-age youth from accessing wraparound service is offered, with suggestions for how school personnel can increase high school graduation rates for their students with the highest needs.
Keywords: research, study, full text

Wraparound Supervision and Management
Author: Patricia Miles
defines three levels of focus for any wraparound supervisor
Keywords: human resource, training, coaching, coach, supervision, supervise, tools

Wraparound: A Key Component of School-Wide Systems of Positive Behavior Supports
Author: Lucille Eber
This paper describes: (1) how the wraparound process can be integrated into schools through SWPBS, (2) differences between wraparound and typical school-based practices, including special education, and (3) how SWPBS systems can support and strengthen the wraparound process and its ability to improve quality of life for youth with unique emotional/behavioral needs, and for their families and teachers
Keywords: setting, school

Wraparound: As a Tertiary Level Intervention for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Needs
Author: Eber, L., Breen, K., Rose, J., Unizycki, R. M., & London, T. H.
If a student has multiple behavior problems that escalate over time and across different settings, school-based problem-solving teams can become quickly overwhelmed, especially when educators identify "setting events" for problem behaviors that have occurred outside of school and are beyond the control of school personnel. Instead of resorting to exclusion or restrictive placements, schools need to be able to implement proactive interventions that match the complexity and intensity of the student's needs. A function-based individualized behavior intervention plan (BIP) has been described as an important foundation for tertiary tier support; however, identifying the function and designing a specific behavior support plan around problem behavior may be insufficient to prevent more failure--and may be potentially more restrictive or punitive for students. This article discusses the wraparound process, a comprehensive intervention for the 1% to 2% of students with the highest level of emotional/behavioral need. As the most complex intervention in the schoolwide positive behavior support (SWPBS) response-to-intervention continuum, wraparound includes specific engagement techniques to ensure that the design of supports and interventions incorporate the voice and perspectives of the family, student, and teacher. The strength-based wraparound approach deliberately builds constructive relationships and support networks among the student, family, and other key adults, including teachers. Addressing the needs of the adults (e.g., family and teacher) is considered critical to ensuring success for the student at school, at home, and in the community. (Contains 1 table, 2 figures, 1 resource and 6 online resources.)
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Wraparound: definition, context for development, and emergence in child welfare.
Author: Ferguson, C.
Wraparound has grown in stature as a way to provide services to some of the neediest children and families in the foster care system. With this growth there is a need for clarification of Wraparound's definition, a description of its development, and an understanding of where it fits within the field of child welfare. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the definition of Wraparound, as well as its relationship with the closely linked system of care philosophy, before discussing its emergence from the field of mental health and use in child welfare. This clarity is necessary for successful research, evaluation, policy-making, and practice.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Wraparound: Medicalization and governmentality
Author: Kaylor, P. J.
Keywords: research, study, abstract
Wrapping around empathy: The role of empathy in the wraparound model
Author: Morrison-Velasco, S.
With the resurgence of the focus on empathy as a major component of therapeutic change, this article discusses the use of empathy in the Wraparound Model, a therapeutic planning process currently used primarily with multineeds families. A case example is provided. In addition, the implications for change in the mental health systems of care are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Wrapping Community-Based Mental Health Services Around Children with a Severe Behavioral Disorder: An Evaluation of Project Wraparound
Author: Clarke, R. T., Schaefer, M., Burchard, J. D., & Welkowitz, J. W.
During the past two decades there has been a significant increase in community-based mental health and educational services for children and youth with serious emotional and behavioral problems and their families. However, in the vast majority of programs there are no reliable longitudinal data on the adjustment of the children that are served. Project Wraparound was a community-based individualized treatment program which served children and youth with severely maladjusted behavior and their families by providing intensive home and school-based services. The purpose of this paper is to provide a longitudinal analysis of client and family adjustment data. Data on client adjustment within the home and characteristics of the home environment were obtained at intervals of 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year. Data on client adjustment in school was obtained at four points over a period of 2 years. The results from 19 cases indicate that substantial change occurred on measures of the home environment and client adjustment in the home with no significant change in adjustment in the school. Implications of the findings are discussed.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Wrapping services in an urban setting
Author: Hyde, K. L., Burchard, J. D., & Woodworth, K.
Efforts to reform services for children and their families in Baltimore City have included providing Wraparound services to youth returned or diverted from out-of-state residential treatment. We briefly present the history and evolution of the system reform efforts in Baltimore City that were necessary to support the implementation of a Wraparound model of service delivery. The characteristics of the Wraparound service model is presented along with the referral pathway of the youth into the service system, the components of the service delivery system and an overview of step-down services and linkages utilized to transition the youth. Data are presented that demonstrate the level of community adjustment of a subset of the 121 youth served through the Wraparound model in contrast to the level of community adjustment achieved by nonequivalent comparison groups. We discuss the use of “report card” type of outcome measures, its user-friendly features, limitations, and the developmental steps needed to refine it further.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Wrapraound Milwaukee (video)
Author: Wraparound Milwaukee
Sam Waterston introduces this video documenting Wraparound Milwaukee's community-based system of care which provides comprehensive, highly individualized, family-directed services to youth with emotional and mental health needs and their families. The program is a 2009 winner of the Innovations in American Government Awards.
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, orient, orientation, family, youth

YOU Have Rights Too!
Author: [various]
Keywords: youth

Your Life, Your Future: An Introduction to Wraparound
Author: Mary Grealish Submitted By: Mary Grealish
An introduction to Wraparound for youth.
Keywords: tool, strategy, engage, engagement, orient, orientation, family, youth

Youth Advocates: What They Do and Why Your Wraparound Program Should Hire One
Author: Brian Lombrowski, Gloria Fields, Antoine Griffin-Van Dorn, & Melissa Castillo
information about youth advocates
Keywords: human resource, role, youth partner

Youth Competency Assessment-- Short Version
Author: NPC Research
template for exploring strengths and including in plan-- designed for youth with juvenile justice involvement
Keywords: tool, strategy, planning, plan, action, culture, step, outcome, goal

Youth Empowerment Support (YES!) Program Info Sheet
Author: [various]
info sheet
Keywords: youth

Youth Engagement, Empowerment, and Participation in Wraparound
Author: Marvin Alexander
information on youth engagement
Keywords: human resource, training, youth partner, coaching, coach, supervision, supervise

Youth in the mental health void: wraparound is one solution
Author: McGuinness, T. M.
Mental health treatment works-if you can gain access to it. For many U.S. children with mental disorders, treatment is so inaccessible that parents must terminate their custodial rights so their children can receive psychiatric care. Use of Safe Haven laws, originally intended to prevent abandonment of newborns, are now being used to provide basic mental health care to youth. The closing of psychiatric services during the past decade has contributed to this crisis. Yet, one solution, wraparound systems of care, holds tremendous promise for providing community-based, comprehensive, and cost-effective care. Psychiatric nurses should support wraparound services as the standard of care for children and their families as health care reform is initiated.
Keywords: research, study, abstract

Youth Involvement in Systems of Care: A Guide to Empowerment
Author: Eva Dech, Mike Friedman, Rachel Freed, Bianca Jay, Stephanie Lane & Dally Sanchez
The goal for Youth Involvement in Systems of Care: A Guide to Empowerment is to provide a resource to youth, youth coordinators, family members, professionals, and other adults working with young people. This guide is a starting point for understanding youth involvement and engagement in order to develop and fully integrate a youth-directed movement within local systems of care.
Keywords: principle, theory, youth partner, coach, supervision, supervise

Youth Involvement in Wraparound at the Organization and System Levels
Author: Janet Walker
a valuable guide to help youth and adults understand how to cultivate youth voice
Keywords: community, partnership, collaboration

Youth Participation in Wraparound Team Planning: Why and How
Author: Janet Walker
why and how to promote youth participation in Wraparound Team Planning
Keywords: human resource, training, youth partner, coaching, coach, supervision, supervise

Youth Support Partner Programs
Author: National Wraparound Initiative
Keywords: human resource, role, youth partner

Youth with High Behavioral Health Needs in Colorado: Cross-System Utilization Patterns
Author: Diane R. Fox, Ph.D., Nancy Johnson Nagel, Ph.D., Kaia Gallagher, Ph.D., Ashley Brock-Baca, Ph.D.
This evaluation attempts to comprehensively document service utilization across child serving systems. This comprehensive system analysis provides information regarding the factors that impact youth outcomes to possibly lead to more effective intervention and coordination of services between systems.
Keywords: program, evaluation, report

YOUTH WITH SERIOUS MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS: WRAPAROUND AS A PROMISING INTERVENTION IN NEW ZEALAND
Author: Shailer, J. C., Gammon, R. A., & de Terte, I.
Youth with serious mental health disorders present with a complexity of challenges for the mental health system, schools, youth justice, care and protection, and their communities. Research shows their needs are best achieved by providing coordinated intensive, multidisciplinary, and individualised services. This article outlines the prevalence and characteristics of youth with serious mental health disorders. It also discusses community-based interventions used in New Zealand and their limitations. It introduces Wraparound, an intensive individualised coordination and care planning process as a promising practice for youth with serious mental health disorders and their families. Key principles and phases underpinning the Wraparound process are presented along with a case vignette to exemplify the process. Its theory of change, the challenges experienced in practice, and a brief overview of the evidence-base are also discussed.
Keywords: research, study, full text